Lydia S. GCSE English Literature tutor, A Level English Literature tu...

Lydia S.

Currently unavailable: until 12/01/2016

Degree: English Literature and Philosophy (Bachelors) - Newcastle University

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About me

About Me.
Hello! My name's Lydia and I study English Literature and Philosophy at Newcastle University and would love to help you with anything you need- be it specific books I have studied or essay preperation!

Trained Essay Advisor.
At university I am a PASS advisor, which stands for Peer Assisted Study Support. We have weekly sessions where students can drop by with their essays for our help! In these sessions I give one on one help to students of all stages with their essays before and after hand in. My main strength is helping with structure; how to structure the essay correctly to make sense and tips to make this clearer. This means that I can help the student even if I do not know about the content of the essay myself; this includes writing essays in exam conditions. 

Hobbies and Interests.
I have done a lot of volunteering projects, most notably working with autistic children in Laos and teaching children in Thailand. I am currently undergoing training to be an NSPCC Services' Volunteer and in my spare time I enjoy volunteering at my local cat sanctuary, swimming and reading!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Literature A Level £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
Philosophy and Ethics GCSE £18 /hr
Psychology GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureA-LevelA
PsychologyA-LevelA
Philosophy of Religion and EthicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

09/07/2015

Currently unavailable: until

12/01/2016

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Questions Lydia has answered

Can you explain the narrative techniques in The Turn of the Screw?

The structure of The Turn of the Screw allows itself three different narratives. The first one is the narrator in the prologue, then we have Douglas' narration of the governess' story, then the manuscript itself written by the governess. The governess is what we would call an unreliable narra...

The structure of The Turn of the Screw allows itself three different narratives. The first one is the narrator in the prologue, then we have Douglas' narration of the governess' story, then the manuscript itself written by the governess.

The governess is what we would call an unreliable narrator. She is unreliable for a variety of reasons- the most well known reason being that she is insane. Following the psychological analysis of the governess' insanity, one can argue that the ghosts are not real, but figments of the governess' imagination- this would make her accounts of the ghosts unreliable. 

Upon close analysis of the text, we see that all opinions we get from the other characters are written by the governess herself, for example when Mrs Grose says 'May I-' the governess intrerrups with 'Kiss me?'. There is no evidence to suggest that this is what Mrs. Grose was really going to say. The fact that all opinions of the characters are articulated from the govereness makes her an unreliable narrator, as she could be incorrectly portraying the characters and their views.

It is important also to recognise there are different types of unreliable narrators- such as 'fallible' and 'untrustworthy'. A fallible narrator is when the narrator believes she is telling us the truth, but is not due to incapabilities such as telling the story years after, or believing something to be true which is in fact not. However an untrustowrthy narrator purposefully misleads the reader, so the governess claiming Flora saw Miss Jessel is a way to justify her aggressive outburst towards her.

An argument I delved into during my studies of detective fiction in university was to place the governess as an untrustworthy narrator due to being a suspect in the murder of Miles- and the purpose of her manuscript to be one that feigns insanity in order to excuse herself for the murder.

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8 months ago

251 views

Can you explain the narrative techniques in The Turn of The Screw?

The governess is what we would call an unreliable narrator. She is unreliable for a variety of reasons- the most popular reason amongst critics being that she is insane. Following thepsychological analysis of the governess' insanity, one can argue that the ghosts are not real, but figments of ...

The governess is what we would call an unreliable narrator. She is unreliable for a variety of reasons- the most popular reason amongst critics being that she is insane. Following the psychological analysis of the governess' insanity, one can argue that the ghosts are not real, but figments of the governess' imagination- this would make her accounts of the ghosts unreliable. 

Upon close analysis of the text, we see that all opinions we get from the other characters are written by the governess herself, for example when Mrs Grose says 'May I-' the governess interrupts with 'Kiss me?'. There is no evidence to suggest that this is what Mrs. Grose was really going to say. The fact that all opinions of the characters are articulated from the governess makes her an unreliable narrator, as she could be incorrectly portraying the characters and their views.

It is important also to recognise there are different types of unreliable narrators- such as 'fallible' and 'untrustworthy'. A fallible narrator is when the narrator believes she is telling us the truth, but is not due to incapabilities such as telling the story years after, or believing something to be true which is in fact not. However an untrustowrthy narrator purposefully misleads the reader, so the governess claiming Flora saw Miss Jessel is a way to justify her aggressive outburst towards her.

An argument I delved into during my studies of detective fiction in university was to place the governess as an untrustworthy narrator due to being a suspect in the murder of Miles- and the purpose of her manuscript to be one that feigns insanity in order to excuse herself for the murder.

see more

8 months ago

223 views

How do I remember quotes from articles in my exam?

The best way to do this is to dedicate a page (or whatever materials you use to revise) for each theme, and pick two key articles for each theme. Make sure you really understand the articles- if you try to chose one that is too complex you will struggle to remember this in your exam! After rea...

The best way to do this is to dedicate a page (or whatever materials you use to revise) for each theme, and pick two key articles for each theme. Make sure you really understand the articles- if you try to chose one that is too complex you will struggle to remember this in your exam! After reading the article, try to give a summary of it in your own words. By putting artiicles into your own words you are more likely to process the information!
It is important to note that in exams the examiner is not looking for perfect quotes from critics. Paraphrasing a quote/ knowing the critics general argument will be more impressive and helpful to your overall essay argument than misquoting a critic or 'throwing it in' for the sake of it.
Try and identify a couple of articles that can relate to many of the themes. For example, if you are analysing the characters and themes of King Lear, an article such as 'The Role of Edmund in King Lear' (McNeir, Vol 8) would perhaps be limited to just a character analysis of Edmund, whereas 'The Storm in King Lear' (Dunn, Vol 3) could be used for the theme of weather, blindness, power, stage directions and more.
A couple of staple quotes should be learnt that can fit most essay questions, finding an informative quote from an articule about Shakespeare's tragedies for example can be worked into most essays to show general knowledge about the play as a whole.

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8 months ago

311 views
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