Contact Isabella
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About me

About Me:

I’m studying Biochemistry at the University of Bristol, which means I love learning and teaching Chemistry and Biology to anyone!

I’ve tutored previously in Spanish and in English and mathematics as a volunteer for primary school aged children and so already have experience in the patience, listening and teaching required to be an effective tutor.  

On top of this, I’m still really passionate about other subjects - I completed the IB Diploma in sixth form because I will always enjoy history, politics and English and Spanish – I even completed my IB extended essay in history!

Sessions:

My three main goals for sessions are:

1. Understanding – we will cover what you feel least confident with so I can ensure the sessions are the most helpful they can be for you.

2. Explanation – I believe the best way to show you understand is to have you explain it fully back to me, so I will make sure you are able to explain a concept back to me before we move on

3. Fun – I will make the sessions as engaging and enjoyable for you as I believe you take more information in if you’re really enjoying the learning.


What to do next:

1. Send me a message through MyTutor if you have any questions;

2. Let me know which subjects you want tutoring in and what it is you’re particularly having trouble with!

I’m very excited to meet you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Chemistry A Level £22 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £20 /hr
English GCSE £20 /hr
History GCSE £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £20 /hr
Politics GCSE £20 /hr
Spanish GCSE £20 /hr
Chemistry IB £22 /hr
English 13 Plus £20 /hr
History 13 Plus £20 /hr
English 11 Plus £20 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
HL ChemistryBaccalaureate7
HL MathematicsBaccalaureate5
HL EnglishBaccalaureate6
SL HistoryBaccalaureate7
SL SpanishBaccalaureate7
SL Global PoliticsBaccalaureate7
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 25 customer reviews

Robert (Parent) June 28 2016

Great start Isabella...

Alexandra (Student) June 7 2016

Isabella has been so amazing with exam preparation! Massive thank you for going through endless number of questions with me :)

Alexandra (Student) May 23 2016

I really appreciate Isabella going through all the questions I send her beforehand, resulting in our sessions always being super productive!

Alexandra (Student) May 16 2016

Extremely helpful as usual:)
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Questions Isabella has answered

How are Van der Waals interactions formed between molecules?

This questions relies on understanding of electronegativity, instantaneous dipoles and temporary induced dipoles. Van der Waal's forces (also called London Dispersion Forces) are weak intermolecular forces between molecules. Electronegativity is the measure of the tendency of an atom to attra...

This questions relies on understanding of electronegativity, instantaneous dipoles and temporary induced dipoles.

Van der Waal's forces (also called London Dispersion Forces) are weak intermolecular forces between molecules.

Electronegativity is the measure of the tendency of an atom to attract electrons, and covalent bonds are formed between two atoms that have similar electronegativity values. When these values are the same in two covalently bonded atoms, both atoms in the molecule exert the same 'pull' on the shared electrons and so the molecule is termed 'non-polar', meaning electrons are distributed equally between the bonded atoms.

However, since electrons are constantly in motion, at any one time there could be more electrons around only one of the bonded atoms, such that an instantaneous dipole is formed. Since electrons are negatively charged, this means one side of the molecule is now more negatively charged than the other as it has more electrons.

After this, since like charges repel like charges (a negative charge will repel another negative charge), this instantaneous dipole will repel the negative electrons in a neighbouring molecule, forming a 'temporary induced dipole' in the neighbouring molecule. This means the neighbouring molecule now has a more positive side around one of its atoms since most of its electrons were pushed to the other side of the molecule. The other side of the neighbouring molecule where all the electrons were repelled to is now more negative than it was before. 

Due to this, the induced positive and instantaneous negative side of the neighbouring and original molecules are now weakly attracted to each other due to positive-negative attraction.

This temporary induced dipole in the neighbouring molecule then repeats the inducing effect on molecules neighbouring it, such that this Van der Waals attraction force is present between many molecules in a substance.

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8 months ago

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