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Andrew M.

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Degree: PhD Physics (Doctorate) - Imperial College London University

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About me

Hi I'm Andy! I'm a PhD Physics student at Imperial College London, I've also got a Masters degree (Distinction) from Imperial and MSci (First Class Hons) in Theoretical Physics from the University of Glasgow. Basically, I love physics, chemistry and maths!

I've been a one-on-one tutor on and off ever since I left school to go to university (8 years ago as a keen 16 year old!), this included voluntary work for an educational charity in London, so I know what it's like to help people who are facing those big exams!

I'm an extremely down-to-earth, friendly guy who loves helping students reach their potential, and showing them the fun side of science and maths along the way! I try and make lessons as interactive and fun as possible, there is nothing worse than coming home from school and being lectured to some more!

I teach mathematics and physics all the way up to A-level. I've had a lot of success with helping students bring up their exam results in school examinations and in encouraging study techniques which helps students succeed in their other subjects too.

So if you are finding you need help with your maths or physics or you just want to build on what you already know and get the grades you want, get in touch!

I look forward to working with you!

Andy.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £30 /hr
Physics A Level £30 /hr
Maths GCSE £30 /hr
Physics GCSE £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Theory and Simulation of MaterialsMasters DegreeDistinction
Theoretical PhysicsMasters Degree1st Class Hons
PhysicsHigherA
MathematicsHigherA
ChemistryHigherA
EnglishHigherA
SpanishHigherA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

14/05/2014

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 12 customer reviews

Janice (Parent) May 14 2016

Great would highly recommend

Janice (Parent) May 24 2016

Andy has been brilliant really explains things to make them more understandable. Would recommend him without question - Cerys AS Level Maths.

Janice (Parent) June 8 2016

Andy has been a great help to my daughter who had completely lost confidence in her ability to pass her AS Level Maths. Andy was not only excellent at explaining but helped give her confidence back.

Janice (Parent) June 9 2016

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Questions Andrew has answered

What is the equivalence principle of General Relativity and what does it mean?

Einstein introduced the equivalence principle by saying "We ... assume the complete physical equivalence of gravitational field and a corresponding acceleration of the reference system". There are many ways of phrasing this but essentially what it is saying is that you can't tell the differen...

Einstein introduced the equivalence principle by saying "We ... assume the complete physical equivalence of gravitational field and a corresponding acceleration of the reference system".

There are many ways of phrasing this but essentially what it is saying is that you can't tell the difference (or there is no difference) being in a gravitational field or 'being accelerated'. If you feel the force you feel normally standing on the Earth, you could be on the Earth ... or you could be in a rocket in deep space accelerating at 1g!

This can then be argued to imply that if you are in a freely falling reference frame, the laws of special relativity hold true for you in that frame (i.e if you are freely falling you don't feel any forces on you, 'a skydiver doesn't feel their weight').

The equivalence principle has important implications, first of all that gravity can bend light! This is the case because if you imagine a freely falling lift with a laser emitter and detector at either end of the lift, in the lift's frame of reference the light travels in a straight line from one side to the next (like in special relativity)! BUT if you change frame of reference and look from the outside into the lift, you see that the light must have travelled in an arc to leave the emitter and land at the detector. Gravity has bent the path of light!

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7 months ago

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Why does increasing the temperature of a gas increase the pressure (when the volume is fixed)?

We can understand this using an idea called the Kinetic Model of Gases. Basically, let's assume that every molecule in the gas is a tiny, tiny snooker ball whizzing around the container. These 'snooker balls' can collide with one another and the walls of the container they are in. Now, the sp...

We can understand this using an idea called the Kinetic Model of Gases. Basically, let's assume that every molecule in the gas is a tiny, tiny snooker ball whizzing around the container. These 'snooker balls' can collide with one another and the walls of the container they are in.

Now, the speed of the gas molecules (snooker balls) depends on their kinetic energy. The more kinetic energy they have, the faster they are moving. And the faster they are moving the harder they must hit each other and the walls.

Increasing the temperature will mean that we supply more energy to the molecules of gas and therefore increase their kinetic energy and speed. They will collide off the walls of the container harder. This raises the pressure because the pressure on the walls is defined as the force exerted by the molecules on the container wall divided by area (the area bit isn't too important here). The pressure is getting bigger because the molecules are whacking the walls harder!

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7 months ago

178 views
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