Sophie S. Music Tutor From Oxford University.

Sophie S.

Unavailable

Music (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Anne's College University

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About me

I am currently studying for a Masters in Composition at the Royal College of Music, London, having graduated with BMus, First Class Hons from St Anne's College, the University of Oxford. As a music student, I have experience working as a mentor for GCSE and A Level students of the ‘Oxfordshire Music Service’s Advanced Musicianship Programme’, and have taught both music theory, composition, film making and video editing in various summer schools. I am also qualified to teach English as a Foreign Language.

A large part of my degree focused on developing a sophisticated writing style and a well structured argument, and so I am very happy to tutor GCSE, 13+ English and offer guidance in analysing set texts, poems and creative writing work. I am also able to offer guidance on all aspects of he A level and GCSE music courses.

Having had several interviews for both conservatoires and universities, I know the interview procedure inside out and would be very happy to give mock-interviews, talk through what sort of questions will come up and how to tackle them in an interesting and engaging manner. I am very happy to look over personal statements, offer grammatical corrections and suggest ways to help your statement standout to the interviewer. 

I am currently studying for a Masters in Composition at the Royal College of Music, London, having graduated with BMus, First Class Hons from St Anne's College, the University of Oxford. As a music student, I have experience working as a mentor for GCSE and A Level students of the ‘Oxfordshire Music Service’s Advanced Musicianship Programme’, and have taught both music theory, composition, film making and video editing in various summer schools. I am also qualified to teach English as a Foreign Language.

A large part of my degree focused on developing a sophisticated writing style and a well structured argument, and so I am very happy to tutor GCSE, 13+ English and offer guidance in analysing set texts, poems and creative writing work. I am also able to offer guidance on all aspects of he A level and GCSE music courses.

Having had several interviews for both conservatoires and universities, I know the interview procedure inside out and would be very happy to give mock-interviews, talk through what sort of questions will come up and how to tackle them in an interesting and engaging manner. I am very happy to look over personal statements, offer grammatical corrections and suggest ways to help your statement standout to the interviewer. 

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About my sessions

I am able to give a thorough grounding in music theory, notation, counterpoint, Bach chorales and composition in both the A level and GCSE music courses. We will explore the set texts by looking at the work’s various components, stylistic traits, structure, harmonic language and the work’s historical and cultural context. I will also help you train your ear for the listening part of the exam.

For English GCSE or A Level, I will help you develop the skills needed to hone a critical argument, both under pressurised exam conditions and in your coursework essays by looking at strategies to help identify which elements in the text are most relevant to your argument so that your discussion is both concise and convincing. For the English A level, we will look at some of the wider discussions surrounding the text made by other scholars. These might relate to the specific work in question, or to a broader theme, for instance, the symbolic use of gothic imagery in Bronte’s ‘Jane Eyre’.

Whilst I have not studied Film Studies, I am employed as a film maker and so would be very happy to offer guidance on the practical module in the Film Studies A Level, as well as the accompanying essay.

Most importantly, I hope to instil in you a passion for your subjects. With sufficient preparation and skill in place, your work can become a truly interesting and thought provoking experience.

I am able to give a thorough grounding in music theory, notation, counterpoint, Bach chorales and composition in both the A level and GCSE music courses. We will explore the set texts by looking at the work’s various components, stylistic traits, structure, harmonic language and the work’s historical and cultural context. I will also help you train your ear for the listening part of the exam.

For English GCSE or A Level, I will help you develop the skills needed to hone a critical argument, both under pressurised exam conditions and in your coursework essays by looking at strategies to help identify which elements in the text are most relevant to your argument so that your discussion is both concise and convincing. For the English A level, we will look at some of the wider discussions surrounding the text made by other scholars. These might relate to the specific work in question, or to a broader theme, for instance, the symbolic use of gothic imagery in Bronte’s ‘Jane Eyre’.

Whilst I have not studied Film Studies, I am employed as a film maker and so would be very happy to offer guidance on the practical module in the Film Studies A Level, as well as the accompanying essay.

Most importantly, I hope to instil in you a passion for your subjects. With sufficient preparation and skill in place, your work can become a truly interesting and thought provoking experience.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

30/05/2018

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MusicA-level (A2)A
EnglishA-level (A2)A
ArtA-level (A2)A*
MusicDegree (Bachelors)FIRST
Composition Degree (Masters)PENDING

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MusicA Level£22 /hr
EnglishGCSE£20 /hr
MusicGCSE£20 /hr
English13 Plus£20 /hr
English11 Plus£20 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Sophie has answered

How do I develop a composition?

A good place to start with a composition is to look at the set works. Perhaps you have been talking about some of the compositional features of the set works, such as melody and accompaniament, rhythmic variations, alberti bass lines or modal harmonies... You need to be able to show the examiner that you are aware of the compositional devices you are using, and that you are able to develop them effectively.

I find that a good way to start a composition is by improvising on my instrument. I then come up with a few key ideas or motives, perhaps a series of notes which create an interesting harmonic soundscape, a rhythmic cell, or perhaps an interesting structure. 

There are many ways to develop your initial ideas. There are systematic ways such as applying devices like retrograde, (playing the pitches backwards) inversion, (flipping the pitches around a pitch centre, for example, if the original melody was C, D, E, G, F, the inverted melody, if flipped around C would be C, Bflat, Aflat, F, G). Or you may want to compose in a more organic way, through improvisation for instance. 

If you are at all stuck, just remember to go back to the orignal idea that you came up with, the piece will sound more coherent if it all links together in some way!

A good place to start with a composition is to look at the set works. Perhaps you have been talking about some of the compositional features of the set works, such as melody and accompaniament, rhythmic variations, alberti bass lines or modal harmonies... You need to be able to show the examiner that you are aware of the compositional devices you are using, and that you are able to develop them effectively.

I find that a good way to start a composition is by improvising on my instrument. I then come up with a few key ideas or motives, perhaps a series of notes which create an interesting harmonic soundscape, a rhythmic cell, or perhaps an interesting structure. 

There are many ways to develop your initial ideas. There are systematic ways such as applying devices like retrograde, (playing the pitches backwards) inversion, (flipping the pitches around a pitch centre, for example, if the original melody was C, D, E, G, F, the inverted melody, if flipped around C would be C, Bflat, Aflat, F, G). Or you may want to compose in a more organic way, through improvisation for instance. 

If you are at all stuck, just remember to go back to the orignal idea that you came up with, the piece will sound more coherent if it all links together in some way!

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2 years ago

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