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About me

About me:

Hi, I’m Jake and I’m a first year undergraduate at the University of Warwick studying Chemistry. As I only finished my A-levels last year, I still have expertise on the A-level syllabus and good exam technique. Due to my college being small, I was the only person in my chemistry class, and so, I have personal experience of one to one teaching and fully understand the benefits it brings.

What will a tutorial be like?

The sessions are directed by you. First, I would cover the theory that you find difficult, explaining it in a straightforward but memorable way. I also believe that getting involved and practicing is one of the best ways to learn. So, during the tutorial I will check that the concepts have been grasped, so you never feel like you don’t really understand. We will do this through past exam questions, quick quizzes and flashcards.

If there is nothing in particular that you would like to be covered, we can either go over past papers (I’m happy to mark them), going over exam technique or we can go over the syllabus or I can even help you with homework- it’s completely up to you.

What to do next?

Please drop me a mail with your exam board and any main topics that you would like to be covered and hopefully I’ll be able to help. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Geography GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA
Geography A-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Ratings and reviews

4.9from 7 customer reviews

Fiona (Parent) June 8 2016

excellent..we will be using Jake again.

Harry (Student) October 19 2016

excellent. Clear and very understandable

Fiona (Parent) June 14 2016

Jake clicked with my Son from the start. he did a great job building his confidence and challenging him at the same time!- thanks Jake

Fiona (Parent) June 1 2016

very good as always great tutor.
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Questions Jake has answered

Explain why Aluminium and Sulfur do not fit the expected trends of first ionisation energies of period 3?

Firstly, we should define the first ionisation energy The first Ionisation Energy is the energy required to remove one mole of electrons from one mole of gaseous atoms to form a mole of gaseous ions, each with an 1+ charge. The expected trend as we go across the period is that ionisation ener...

Firstly, we should define the first ionisation energy

The first Ionisation Energy is the energy required to remove one mole of electrons from one mole of gaseous atoms to form a mole of gaseous ions, each with an 1+ charge.

The expected trend as we go across the period is that ionisation energy will increase as the nuclear charge increases and the number of shielding shells of electrons does not change. So the extra amount of protons means the nucleus holds the outer electrons more strongly so it requires more energy to remove an electron.

Aluminium has a lower ionisation energy than Magnesium. This is unexpected as Al has more protons. This can be explained by electron configurations.

Magnesium's electron config: 1s2s2 2p3s

Aluminium's electron config: 1s2s2 2p3s3p

Aluminium's outer electron is in a p orbital. This p sub-level is of higher energy than the s sub-level and so less energy is required to remove this electron.

Sulfur has a lower ionisation energy than phosphorous. This again is explained by their electron configurations

Phosphorous: 1s2s2 2p3s3p3

Sulphur: 1s2s2 2p3s3p4

A p sub-level has 3 sub-shells which can hold 2 electrons in each sub-shell. In phosphorous, the electrons are unpaired with one electron in each sub-shell with parallel spins. However, sulphur has 4 electrons so one of them must pair in a sub shell. As electrons are both negative particles, the paired electrons repel each other and so it is easier to remove the unpaired electron in phosphorous- so less energy is required.

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7 months ago

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