Serena T. A Level Psychology tutor, GCSE Maths tutor

Serena T.

£18 - £20 /hr

Studying: Psychology (Bachelors) - Birmingham University

5.0
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9 reviews| 14 completed tutorials

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About me

Hello everyone,  My name is Serena Taylor-Wright. I am a Psychology student at the University of Birmingham. I have always found Psychology fascinating and I hope to continue helping people to achieve their goals and find their own passion by working as an educational psychologist. I feel this would be the perfect career for me as I would find it rewarding and enjoyable.  I also studied Maths at GCSE and A Level, achieving an A* at GCSE and an A at A Level. Thus, this is another subject I would be very willing to tutor.  I am a very friendly, hard-working individual and am always happy to answer any questions.  How to contact me:  Send me a message through the MyTutor page if you would like to schedule a free meeting lasting for around 10 to 15 minutes to ask me any questions and to double check I am the right tutor for you. I normally reply within 24 hours. If you do decide to book a tutorial with me, please send me the topics you would like to go through so I can prepare and help as best as I can. You can record all the sessions to revise over what we have discussed. Thank you! I look forward to hearing from you. 

Hello everyone,  My name is Serena Taylor-Wright. I am a Psychology student at the University of Birmingham. I have always found Psychology fascinating and I hope to continue helping people to achieve their goals and find their own passion by working as an educational psychologist. I feel this would be the perfect career for me as I would find it rewarding and enjoyable.  I also studied Maths at GCSE and A Level, achieving an A* at GCSE and an A at A Level. Thus, this is another subject I would be very willing to tutor.  I am a very friendly, hard-working individual and am always happy to answer any questions.  How to contact me:  Send me a message through the MyTutor page if you would like to schedule a free meeting lasting for around 10 to 15 minutes to ask me any questions and to double check I am the right tutor for you. I normally reply within 24 hours. If you do decide to book a tutorial with me, please send me the topics you would like to go through so I can prepare and help as best as I can. You can record all the sessions to revise over what we have discussed. Thank you! I look forward to hearing from you. 

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About my sessions

In my sessions, I go over all the AQA Exam Board topics in great detail with many studies to help understanding. Before I move on from any topic, I make sure any questions are answered. I also go through example A* essays to help students prep for the exam. 

In my sessions, I go over all the AQA Exam Board topics in great detail with many studies to help understanding. Before I move on from any topic, I make sure any questions are answered. I also go through example A* essays to help students prep for the exam. 

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25/07/2016

Ratings & Reviews

5from 9 customer reviews
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Beth (Parent)

March 16 2017

Serena is very detailed with all her explanations and always takes her time to go through anything I don't understand even if I ask her to repeat it about 100 times! . She's a great tutor! :)

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Loui (Parent)

May 26 2016

Great tutor; goes out of her way to make sure you understand the topic

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Beth (Parent)

May 2 2017

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Beth (Parent)

April 18 2017

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A
PsychologyA-level (A2)A
Film StudiesA-level (A2)A
Theatre StudiesA-level (A2)B

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
PsychologyA Level£20 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Serena has answered

What are the clinical characteristics of Schizophrenia?

When looking at the clinical characteristics of schizophrenia, some psychologists make a distinction between positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Positive symptoms are those showing an excess or distortion of normal functioning (hallucinations, delusions, experiences of control and disordered thinking). Negative symptoms are those reflecting a loss of normal functioning (disturbances of affect (emotions), alogia and avolition)

+ Hallucinations: bizarre, unreal perceptions of the environment. They are usually auditory in the form of hearing voices but can be visual, smelling or taste.

+ Delusions: false beliefs that seem real to the person that remain even in the presence of disconfirming evidence. 

+ Experiences of control: individual may believe that they are under the control of an external force that has invaded their mind/body e.g. aliens/government. 

+ Disordered thinking: involves thought disturbances; either believing thoughts have been inserted or withdrawn by someone else or that thoughts are being broadcasted to others. It also involves problems with thought processes; not being able to maintain focus and attention in thought (indicated by loosely connected speech). 

- Disturbances of affect (emotions): involve flattened effect (reduction in the range and intensity of emotional expression) and inappropriate effect (displaying emotions inappropriate to the situation). 

- Alogia: poor speech; i.e. breaks in trail of thought leads to incoherent speech. Alogia may also urge neologism (made up words). 

- Avolition: the individual has no motivation to initiate or persist in goals, e.g. sits around for hours doing nothing. 

When looking at the clinical characteristics of schizophrenia, some psychologists make a distinction between positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Positive symptoms are those showing an excess or distortion of normal functioning (hallucinations, delusions, experiences of control and disordered thinking). Negative symptoms are those reflecting a loss of normal functioning (disturbances of affect (emotions), alogia and avolition)

+ Hallucinations: bizarre, unreal perceptions of the environment. They are usually auditory in the form of hearing voices but can be visual, smelling or taste.

+ Delusions: false beliefs that seem real to the person that remain even in the presence of disconfirming evidence. 

+ Experiences of control: individual may believe that they are under the control of an external force that has invaded their mind/body e.g. aliens/government. 

+ Disordered thinking: involves thought disturbances; either believing thoughts have been inserted or withdrawn by someone else or that thoughts are being broadcasted to others. It also involves problems with thought processes; not being able to maintain focus and attention in thought (indicated by loosely connected speech). 

- Disturbances of affect (emotions): involve flattened effect (reduction in the range and intensity of emotional expression) and inappropriate effect (displaying emotions inappropriate to the situation). 

- Alogia: poor speech; i.e. breaks in trail of thought leads to incoherent speech. Alogia may also urge neologism (made up words). 

- Avolition: the individual has no motivation to initiate or persist in goals, e.g. sits around for hours doing nothing. 

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2 years ago

1169 views

What are the limitations of using Informed Consent in a study? And how do researchers overcome this?

Limitations:

- If a participant is given information concerning the nature and purpose of a study this may invalidate the purpose of the study.

- Even if researchers have sought and obtained informed consent, that does not guarantee that participants really do understand what they have let themselves in for. 

- The problem with presumptive consent (see the explanation of this term below) is that what people expect that they will or will not mind can be different from actually experiencing it. (E.g. Milgram’s Study)

Overcoming Limitations:

- Participants are asked to formally indicate their agreement to participate and this should be based on comprehensive information concerning the nature and purpose of the research and their role in it.

- An alternative is to gain presumptive consent: A method of dealing with lack of informed consent or deception, by asking a group of people who are similar to the participants whether they would agree to take part in a study. If this group of people consents to the procedures in the proposed study, it is presumed that the real participants would also have agreed.

- Researchers can also offer the right to withdraw.

Limitations:

- If a participant is given information concerning the nature and purpose of a study this may invalidate the purpose of the study.

- Even if researchers have sought and obtained informed consent, that does not guarantee that participants really do understand what they have let themselves in for. 

- The problem with presumptive consent (see the explanation of this term below) is that what people expect that they will or will not mind can be different from actually experiencing it. (E.g. Milgram’s Study)

Overcoming Limitations:

- Participants are asked to formally indicate their agreement to participate and this should be based on comprehensive information concerning the nature and purpose of the research and their role in it.

- An alternative is to gain presumptive consent: A method of dealing with lack of informed consent or deception, by asking a group of people who are similar to the participants whether they would agree to take part in a study. If this group of people consents to the procedures in the proposed study, it is presumed that the real participants would also have agreed.

- Researchers can also offer the right to withdraw.

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2 years ago

849 views

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