PremiumKate M. GCSE English Literature tutor, A Level English Literature tutor

Kate M.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: English Literary Studies (Masters) - Durham University

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About me

A (hopefully) brief introduction:

Hi there! I’m Kate. Having previously studied English Literature at the University of Warwick, I clearly couldn’t keep away from books for long, as I’ve now just finished studying my MA at the University of Durham (specialising in Old and Middle English - it’s reassuring to know what literature has always been about asking deep questions and coming back with conflicting answers). The texts I studied at GCSE and A-Level such as Macbeth, The Waste Land, and Frankenstein have helped shape and inform the person I am today, and I am excited at the prospect of helping students understand the meanings, contexts, and imagery of a text in order to fully appreciate them (even if you have to channel that appreciation into an hour of exam analysis).

I have had previous tutoring in schools as part of widening participation programme at Warwick, where myself and my peers taught specialised ten-week courses to years 9 and 10,  on topics such as ‘The Undead’ and ‘Dystopia’. The online format of MyTutor means I’ll be able to help students tailor their learning as needed. Only need help on wrapping your head around what that green light means in The Great Gatsby, or how An Inspector Calls utilizes stage direction? No problem! Want to be able to feel that you can approach a text confidently before an exam, or feel secure analysing a poetic extract even if it’s the one you didn’t revise as well? Then that’s what I’ll walk you through.

If you think you’d be interested in a tutoring session, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch and say hello. I’d be happy to organise a Meet The Tutor Session so you can tell me more about what I can do for you and how I can help you achieve your learning goals.

Getting a bit more specific:

Owing to work commitments, I am able to teach before 11am daily and after 8.30pm (weekdays) and after 6.30pm (weekends). If you would like any times outside of these, please feel free to get in touch and I’ll see what I can do to accommodate a more agreeable time. I am available to tutor any day of the week that is easiest for you.

Below are a selection of texts which I am able to tutor students more thoroughly on. This list is not extensive, and while it is only modelled on the AQA exam-board, many of the texts overlap with OCR and WJEC. If there are any texts which are not listed, feel free to get in contact and enquire about particular authors or texts – I haven’t read every book, but I am certainly slowly working towards having read many!

GCSE texts (for both the old and new AQA specifications):

Modern texts such as Priestley’s An Inspector Calls, Golding’s Lord of the Flies, Orwell’s Animal Farm and Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

For the bard himself: Macbeth, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, and The Tempest.

I’m familiar with all the 19th century novel texts (taught from September 2015), including Stevenson’s Jekyll and Hyde, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Doyle’s The Sign of Four, and Dicken’s Great Expectations and A Christmas Carol.

For those adventuring into AS/A-Level: I can work with you on Shakespeare’s Othello, The Taming of the Shrew, and The Winter’s Tale, as well as many of the texts in the ‘Texts in Shared Contexts’ topic area, which encompasses both WWI and its aftermath and 1945 to present day works.

I am also available to advise on independent critical studies, coursework, and literature-based EPQ topics, although I would suggest dropping me a quick message first to ensure it is a work I know enough to help with.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Literature A Level £22 /hr
English Literature GCSE £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureBachelors Degree1st
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
English LanguageA-LevelA*
Religion, Philosophy, and EthicsA-LevelA*
English Literary StudiesMasters DegreeWith Distinction
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

13/03/2014

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 7 customer reviews

Michael (Parent) June 2 2016

Thank you again! Kate has been so helpful over the past few weeks in getting me ready for my lit exam and i'm starting to feel so much more confident for it!

Michael (Parent) May 26 2016

Kate is very knowledgeable about the texts i am studying and has definitely gone the extra mile to help! I have found the sessions so far extremely useful in ensuring i am able to think on the spot and the develop my arguments to include the terminology and key elements that the examiner is looking for :)

Michael (Parent) May 17 2016

I found it very helpful going through the key themes of the gothic and linking them to the texts i am studying, particularly when linking it to a past question as it allowed me to consider how i would be able to link what i know to other gothic concepts and key themes in the books when in the exam!

Bhavesh (Parent) November 2 2016

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Questions Kate has answered

Comment on the theme of revenge in Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Revenge tragedies were popular in Elizabethan theatre for their violent action and on-stage spectacle of bloody justice.Hamlet uses a medieval Danish revenge story as a framework to comment on the internal ambiguity of the revenge tragedy as a genre, questioning whether murder is acceptable (p...

Revenge tragedies were popular in Elizabethan theatre for their violent action and on-stage spectacle of bloody justice. Hamlet uses a medieval Danish revenge story as a framework to comment on the internal ambiguity of the revenge tragedy as a genre, questioning whether murder is acceptable (particularly the murder of a king, in the context of a society in which the ruler was seen to rule through a ‘divine right’) and how the cycle of violence can end when every murder has to be answered by another.

The narrative of Hamlet is dominated by Hamlet, Laertes, and Fortinbras, three men seeking revenge for the death of their families. Using soliloquies, which provide an externalised insight of the internal thoughts of a character for the audience, Hamlet discusses whether he should revenge his father, yet each of the play’s acts of violence (often upon the innocent characters rather than the guilty) inspire more. Hamlet’s murder of Polonius cause the suicide of Ophelia and inspires Laertes to try and kill Hamlet; Laertes’ arrangement of the poisoned sword and drink at the fencing match kills Claudius and Gertrude as well as Hamlet. Revenge in Hamlet is shown to be disruptive to society, and the motif of disease throughout is used to comment on the ‘rotten state’ of Denmark corrupted by violence. Only through the final deaths of the play can order then be re-established by Fortinbras.

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7 months ago

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How is violence portrayed in Macbeth?

Violence is an integral theme in Macbeth  - indeed, the word ‘blood’ occurs forty-two times throughout the play. The action of the play is a cyclical one; a traitor to the crown is vanquished, those who violate the social codes of rule die violently, and a benevolent king is restored. The ques...

Violence is an integral theme in Macbeth  - indeed, the word ‘blood’ occurs forty-two times throughout the play. The action of the play is a cyclical one; a traitor to the crown is vanquished, those who violate the social codes of rule die violently, and a benevolent king is restored. The question remains however, whether the play considers violence as unnatural and related to the Gothic transgressive, or whether it is acceptable – or even praised – in particular social spaces.

The act of violence given the most weight in the play is the murder of Duncan. Like classical Greek tragedy, his death is off-stage, which strikes us as potentially reserved for a play which features the brutal on-stage murder of a child. However, witnessing the murder through the panicked and visceral dialogue between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth – Duncan’s body with its ‘gash’d stabs [that] look’d like a breach in nature’ – allows the play to focus more intently on the psychological effect on the main characters, and frames the regicide of Duncan as an act that is too horrific to be seen, only horrifically imagined. Written sometime after the Gunpowder Plot against James I  in 1605, the play places the divine right of kings as sacred and integral to the well-being of the nation.  The actions of the Macbeths in turn corrupt Scotland, turning the sky dark and animals cannibalistic, and this corruption doesn’t stop at nature. Donalbain claims that ‘the near in blood, the nearer bloody’ – while this comment contextually refers to the dangers posed to the king’s heirs, it can also be seen as a comment on how the nearer to violence people are, the more likely they are corrupted by it. Macbeth’s murder of Duncan leads to the murder of Banquo, Lady MacDuff, her Son and Young Siward, his blood-lust only cut short by his own death.

Yet, in regards to this, there is much violence in the play that is not framed so negatively.  Both Macbeth and Banquo originally win their glories in battle, the ‘worthy’ Macbeth ‘smoked with bloody execution’, and the death of Young Siward is considered honourable. The cyclical narrative of the play – battles begetting battles – could imply that the world is naturally violent, but that violence becomes unnatural when it is associated with the transgressive – Macbeth’s association with the barely-human supernatural and Lady Macbeth’s part in the action, going against  expected female gender roles.

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5 months ago

218 views
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