Connor G. GCSE Physics tutor, IB Physics tutor, 13 plus  History tuto...

Connor G.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Physics (Masters) - Bristol University

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About me

About Me:

I am a physics student at the University of Bristol. I have always had a deep passion in exploring the language of mathematics and applying it to physical concepts, and I hope that my tutorials will instill that passion in you too. 

I have been tutoring online internationally for the past seven months, helping children of ages as young as ten to develop and refine their math skill set. 

At GCSE level I felt that my teacher wasn't covering the content that I really struggled with so a lot of the material learned was in my own time, however I managed to achieve an A*. I understand that the tuition received in class isn't necessarily all you need to succeed to your best potential, I want to help you do just that!

The Tutorials:

The content of the tutorials is determined by you; we will work through the areas you feel the least confident in so that you've got a solid understanding of the key concepts before we tackle some exam questions.

The lessons will contain diagrams and illustrations to find what helps you learn the most effectively, I will prepare examples for you before the tutorial and guide you through them so that you are confident to explain them back to me!

So What's Next?

If you have any questions or any topics in particular you'd really like to cover please feel free to send me a message, or book a "Meet the Tutor" session! Remember to include what exam board you are studying so I can prepare some examples for you.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
History A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr
Maths IB £20 /hr
Maths IB £20 /hr
Physics IB £20 /hr
Physics IB £20 /hr
History 13 Plus £18 /hr
History 13 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA
Extended ProjectA-LevelA*
Product DesignHigherB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Questions Connor has answered

How do you expand brackets?

The easiest method to expand brackets would be to remember FOIL! F - First O - Outside I - Inside L - Last Okay, so lets say you want to expand (3x+1)(2x+3), we'll fist multiply the f irst term of each bracket, 3x*2x, which gives us 6x2. Next the outside term of each, 3x*3, which makes 9x. Then...

The easiest method to expand brackets would be to remember FOIL!
F - First
O - Outside
I - Inside
L - Last

Okay, so lets say you want to expand (3x+1)(2x+3), we'll fist multiply the first term of each bracket, 3x*2x, which gives us 6x2. Next the outside term of each, 3x*3, which makes 9x. Then the inside terms which are 1*2x, making just 2x. Finally the last terms, 3*1 which is just 3.
Adding these four together we get:
6x2+9x+2x+3
We can simplify the two x terms to leave us with a final answer of:
6x2+11x+3
 

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7 months ago

202 views

How important were the railroads in opening up the American West?

Although other factors contributed greatly the the spread of American civilisation across the Plains, the railroads were incredibly significant for three main reasons: 1. The railways, specifically the Pacific Railroad, provided a catalyst to the boom of the cattle industry. The railroads elim...

Although other factors contributed greatly the the spread of American civilisation across the Plains, the railroads were incredibly significant for three main reasons:
1. The railways, specifically the Pacific Railroad, provided a catalyst to the boom of the cattle industry. The railroads eliminated the need for the perilous cattle drives over miles of wasteland, instead cattle carts could be used fro safe and convinient transportation.
2. It encouraged people to go West. There was no longer the risk associated with travelling along the beaver trails which were plagued with native American attacks, robbery, disease and a whole host of other reasons as to why you'd much rather stay at home. The railroad was considerably safer and made the promise of cheap land for Homesteaders much more accessible.
3. The railroad companies were given the incentive of two miles of land either side of the tracks they installed. This led the companies to sell off the land for incredibly low prices after construction.

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7 months ago

214 views

Is Pluto a planet?

Pluto is officially no longer classed as a planet, and here's why. The International Astronomical Union defined three rules in 2005 that a celestial body (an object observable within space) must follow to be classed as a planet: 1. The planet must orbit the sun. 2. The planet must be large eno...

Pluto is officially no longer classed as a planet, and here's why. The International Astronomical Union defined three rules in 2005 that a celestial body (an object observable within space) must follow to be classed as a planet:

1. The planet must orbit the sun.
2. The planet must be large enough that its gravity can smooth it into a nice spherical shape.
3. It must have cleared up the surrounding objects around it.
Pluto fails number three as it simply isn't massive enough to pull the surrounding objects into it's orbit. This is really hard for Pluto as it lives in the Kuiper Belt, a belt of other large rocky objects.
Fortunately for Pluto it matches the first two rules, so it can be classed as a dwarf planet instead!

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7 months ago

214 views
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