Maddie S. 13 plus  Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, 11 Plus Maths tutor
£22 /hr

Maddie S.

Degree: Film and Televison Production (Bachelors) - York University

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About me

Hiya! I'm Maddie and I'm currently in my second year at the University of York where I'm studying Film and TV Production BSc. I chose to do a BSc because of my Maths and Physics background, both of which I achieved A* at A level. I really enjoyed maths when I was at school, probably due to having awesome teachers who were enthusiastic and fun. Looking back at all my subjects, I definitely enjoyed a class more if I got on with the teacher. Obviously, as a student, I'm poor! Tutoring maths, for me, has been enjoyable and flexible work where I can really get to know my students and hopefully instill some passion and knowledge. I can't always guarantee passion, I fully understand that sometimes exams just need to be passed!! However, passion would be the cherry on top. Outside of tutoring I enjoy watching TV, reading, cooking, baking and being outdoors. My specialty is meatballs and pasta, my favourite TV show is Big Brother and at the minute I'm reading The Truth and Other Lies.

About my sessions

When I first meet a new student I will ask them about their maths lessons at school; whether they enjoy it, what they're covering, what kind of homework they get. For GCSE I will also ask whether they are working towards Higher or Foundation. This helps me get a sense of their attitude towards maths whether it be disheartened or enthusiastic. Sometimes pupils come to me with specific issues, homework help etc. However, I'm also happy to cover the syllabus as revision or even as preparation for the next year of study. I like to think that my lessons are relaxed and friendly. I usually start by asking how they are, if they've been up to anything cool, and finally what they've covered in their latest maths lessons. I always prepare for my sessions just before teahcing which means the questions and intentions are still fresh in my mind. My lessons are completely 'personalizable', we can go with what I've planned or we can do something they've just remembered they struggle with. Just chat to me about what you think will suit you best, that's the most important thing. To measure progress we will do longer questions which require previous knowledge to be recalled (something maths is notorious for) as well as past papers where appropriate. My favourite part of tutoring is seeing the proud expression on a students face after achieving something difficult. A celebration dance is always on offer, I believe it's important to take the time to notice the successes.

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Maths GCSE £22 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £22 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £22 /hr

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-levelA2A*
PhysicsA-levelA2A*
MediaA-levelA2B
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

28/05/2014

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

4.9from 13 customer reviews

JOSEPH (Parent) February 22 2017

hi

JOSEPH (Parent) September 21 2016

highly recommended.

JOSEPH (Parent) September 15 2016

Maddie is brilliant. really friendly, highly recommend her to anyone. im certain she will have a very successful future.my daughter has really enjoyed working with maddie.

JOSEPH (Parent) August 15 2016

she done amazingly i know so much know i wish to carry on in the future
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Questions Maddie has answered

How do I add decimal numbers?

Adding decimal numbers is done exactly the same as normal numbers: the column method. When you have 2 decimal numbers to add together the most important thing is to line up the decimal points (dots) so that they're all above each other. You should now have 2 numbers on top of each other to ad...

Adding decimal numbers is done exactly the same as normal numbers: the column method.

When you have 2 decimal numbers to add together the most important thing is to line up the decimal points (dots) so that they're all above each other. You should now have 2 numbers on top of each other to add together. If you have any gaps then quickly draw a 0 to fill it.

After this, start on the right hand side of the column and add together the numbers which are on top of each other. If the answer is less than 10 then write it below the numbers you just added together. If the number is above 10 then write down the last number: for example if your answer is 15 then write down 5, if your answer is 47 then write down 7, and if your answer is 22 then write down 2. The tens carries over to the next column of numbers (the column to the left of the one you just added together).

Keep doing this until you get to the far left of the column. If you've lined up the decimal point then you shouldnt have to worry about it whilst you do all the adding. 

Finally, add a decimal point into your answer exactly below the others in your column equation. 

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1 year ago

597 views

How do you simplify numbers with powers?

This is your example problem: (m4)3 ​ First of all remember what a single power means. So: m4 = m x m x m x m This must mean that: (m4)3 = m4 x m4 x m4 ​​If you expand this out, how many m's will you get? (m4)3 = m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m We have 12 m's. Can you see how...

This is your example problem: (m4)3

First of all remember what a single power means. So:

m4 = m x m x m x m

This must mean that:

(m4)3 = m4 x m4 x m4

​If you expand this out, how many m's will you get?

(m4)3 = m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m x m

We have 12 m's. Can you see how we might get 12 from the numbers we were given in the question? By explanding it out we have proven that you multiply the 4 and the 3.

This rule can be applied to all problems like this.

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1 year ago

656 views

How should I present my working out?

Presenting your working out is extremely important because it's makes the examiners jobs easier, keeping them happy. One thing you should aim to do is not write too small, try and use all the space you're given in the answer booklet. Leave clear spaces between different equations so they don'...

Presenting your working out is extremely important because it's makes the examiners jobs easier, keeping them happy.

One thing you should aim to do is not write too small, try and use all the space you're given in the answer booklet. Leave clear spaces between different equations so they don't get muddled up.

Make sure that when you're writing down your working out you don't miss out any of the steps, even if you can easily do them in your head. This is because it makes it easier for the examiner to see how you got your answer. It also makes it easier for you to see where you might have slipped up when you check your work.

Laying out your mathmatical steps in order is also important. If you're doing equations, I would suggest that you work down the page, lining up the equals sign underneath each other.

Doing these things whilst you do practice exam questions will help you get into the habit of good presentation. Not only will your maths look good (who thought it could!?), most of all it'll help you get as many marks as you deserve!

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1 year ago

601 views
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