Srijan P. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Further Math...

Srijan P.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Computer Science (Bachelors) - Cambridge University

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About me

About Me

I am in my final year of studying Computer Science at the University of Cambridge, which I have thoroughly enjoyed. While I have some previous tutoring experience from school, it is still relatively new to me. However I am eager to pass on my enthusiasm and confidence in mathematical subjects!

Sessions

The focus of sessions will be your choice and once decided I hope to make the sessions engaging by giving detailed explanations, diagrams and links to real world applications. My aim will be to help you understand the concepts and methods used to solve problems in these domains, and hopefully make it enjoyable!

What next?

Please feel free to message me if you have any questions!

I hope to see you soon!

 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Computing A Level £20 /hr
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Computing GCSE £18 /hr
Further Mathematics GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr
.STEP. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA*
Further MathematicsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
GermanA-LevelB
STEP Mathematics IUni Admissions TestS
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

20/11/2013

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

4.7from 3 customer reviews

Kevin (Student) October 1 2016

Kevin (Student) September 10 2016

Mariam (Parent) September 10 2016

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Questions Srijan has answered

Given that the equation x^2 - 2x + 2 = 0 has roots A and B, find the values A + B, and A * B.

There are two obvious approaches here: 1. Solve the equation x2 - 2x  + 2 = 0 to find A and B and then calculate the required values. 2. Or we can use the quicker method of analysing what it means for the expression to have these two roots. It implies that the expression on the left hand sid...

There are two obvious approaches here:

1. Solve the equation x2 - 2x  + 2 = 0 to find A and B and then calculate the required values.

2. Or we can use the quicker method of analysing what it means for the expression to have these two roots.

It implies that the expression on the left hand side can be factorised into the form (x - A) (x - B) as this provides the solutions x = A, x = B to the equation (x - A) (x - B) = 0. Expanding this out in general gives x2 - (A + B) x + A * B = 0.

By comparing the two equations we can then read off from the coefficients that - (A + B) = - 2 and A * B = 2. So we now have the answers:

A + B  = 2
A * B = 2

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6 months ago

171 views

What are the postulates of special relativity?

There are two postulates of special relativity: 1. The laws of physics are invariant in all inertial frames of reference. What this means is that if we have a description for how physical systems undergo change in one frame F, then that should remain the same in another frame F' as long as F'...

There are two postulates of special relativity:

1. The laws of physics are invariant in all inertial frames of reference.

What this means is that if we have a description for how physical systems undergo change in one frame F, then that should remain the same in another frame F' as long as F' is only moving at a constant velocity relative to F. Note that a frame of reference is just a set of coordinate axes against which we can measure positions in space and time. Inertial means that it is non-accelerating.

2. The speed of light in a vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of the motion of the light source.

This means that regardless of how the light source is moving with relative to the observer, the speed of light will be measured as a constant c.

From these postulates we can then derive the consequences such as length contraction, time dilation, universal speed limit etc. 

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6 months ago

164 views
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