PremiumNina M. GCSE German tutor, A Level English Language tutor, GCSE Engli...

Nina M.

£24 - £26 /hr

Linguistics and English Language (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

5.0
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124 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

137 completed lessons

About me

Who are you and what do you do?

I am a 22-year-old Linguistics and English Language student at the University of Edinburgh.

“What is Linguistics?” you ask? Linguistics is the science of language. It’s about how language works, on paper and in your brain, how language changes over time, and how it is used by different people. It’s the perfect course for me as I am fascinated by languages and love learning new ones, as well as the way language is used in society. I have also taken courses on the history of English, all the way from Proto-Indo-European, through Old and Middle English, to present day variation. Having grown up in Austria, my native language is German but since secondary school I’ve been particularly interested in the English language. However, having also studied French and Spanish in school I’m well versed in language learning and know how tricky it can be. I tutored classmates all throughout secondary school and spent 3 months in Ecuador teaching English to adults and children. For the past year I have also been a peer support leader at University, supporting other students with Linguistics and English language.

Who are you and what do you do?

I am a 22-year-old Linguistics and English Language student at the University of Edinburgh.

“What is Linguistics?” you ask? Linguistics is the science of language. It’s about how language works, on paper and in your brain, how language changes over time, and how it is used by different people. It’s the perfect course for me as I am fascinated by languages and love learning new ones, as well as the way language is used in society. I have also taken courses on the history of English, all the way from Proto-Indo-European, through Old and Middle English, to present day variation. Having grown up in Austria, my native language is German but since secondary school I’ve been particularly interested in the English language. However, having also studied French and Spanish in school I’m well versed in language learning and know how tricky it can be. I tutored classmates all throughout secondary school and spent 3 months in Ecuador teaching English to adults and children. For the past year I have also been a peer support leader at University, supporting other students with Linguistics and English language.

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About my sessions

Tutoring is always all about the student. You tell me what you don’t understand and I will do my very best to help you. There are no stupid questions! If you struggle with specific subject matters it would be great if you let me know in advance so I can think about ways to effectively explain them to you. Depending on your needs, we can go through key concepts of your course, practice with past papers or focus on vocabulary and conversation! Because I didn’t go through the British school system myself, I’m not immediately familiar with it and would be very grateful if you could also mention your exam board and year when you message me. Please note that I do not tutor English Literature, only English Language! Feel free to message me anytime and I’m looking forward to meeting you! :)

Tutoring is always all about the student. You tell me what you don’t understand and I will do my very best to help you. There are no stupid questions! If you struggle with specific subject matters it would be great if you let me know in advance so I can think about ways to effectively explain them to you. Depending on your needs, we can go through key concepts of your course, practice with past papers or focus on vocabulary and conversation! Because I didn’t go through the British school system myself, I’m not immediately familiar with it and would be very grateful if you could also mention your exam board and year when you message me. Please note that I do not tutor English Literature, only English Language! Feel free to message me anytime and I’m looking forward to meeting you! :)

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 124 customer reviews
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Elizabeth (Parent from Canterbury)

May 26 2018

Learning a language is not easy, especially when you are older. The key for me has been to have interesting topics to use as a base for conversation and through that explore the grammar. Nina is brilliant at conversing on and researching a wide range of topics, for she has such a rich knowledge of language and its quirkiness . Also her notes are detailled, as Nina works hard during the lesson to document all our work on the "board", as a written reference, which is ideal for a revision and consolidation of learning.

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Elizabeth (Student)

May 14 2018

As always very informative and working hard to encourage and promote learning

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Elizabeth (Student)

March 23 2018

Nina has planned some conversation themes for lesson, which has been extremely helpful and with good range of topical vocabulary.

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Elizabeth (Student)

January 24 2018

Nina manages to write such good notes of our lesson, which obviously is key to making the most of the material discussed

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
EnglishOther (A2)1 (A)
GermanOther (A2)1 (A)
FrenchOther (A2)1 (A)
MathematicsOther (A2)1 (A)
EthicsOther (A2)1 (A)

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
English LanguageA Level£26 /hr
GermanA Level£26 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£24 /hr
GermanGCSE£24 /hr
GermanIB£26 /hr
German13 Plus£24 /hr

Questions Nina has answered

Are there fun ways to learn German?

Language learning doesn’t have to be a tedious task of memorising verb tables (at least not all of the time).

Duolingo: https://www.duolingo.com/

One fun way of practising German is Duolingo. This free website and app allows you to translate sentences and practising different aspects of grammar. What’s important here is that you practise grammar by using it rather than being prompted to recall an entire table of verb conjugations. Because there is also a smartphone app, Duolingo makes it very easy for you to practise just a little bit every day. In return you gain points and can even compete with your friends.

Read books:

Depending on your level of German it could be fun for you to try reading German books. You don’t have to go for high literature in order to learn, just pick a story you find interesting or maybe a German translation of a book you already know. I personally gained a lot by reading Harry Potter in English when I was first learning English.

Listen to music or podcasts:

No matter what your taste in music is, you’ll find German music you love. Listening to music helps you build your vocabulary and passive understanding. Soon enough you’ll sing along and before you know it you have massively improved your German knowledge without even trying.

Watch films with subtitles:

There are lots of German films you could watch with subtitles. This really helps your comprehension and helps you get used to spoken German.

If you need film, book or music recommendations, feel free to message me!

Language learning doesn’t have to be a tedious task of memorising verb tables (at least not all of the time).

Duolingo: https://www.duolingo.com/

One fun way of practising German is Duolingo. This free website and app allows you to translate sentences and practising different aspects of grammar. What’s important here is that you practise grammar by using it rather than being prompted to recall an entire table of verb conjugations. Because there is also a smartphone app, Duolingo makes it very easy for you to practise just a little bit every day. In return you gain points and can even compete with your friends.

Read books:

Depending on your level of German it could be fun for you to try reading German books. You don’t have to go for high literature in order to learn, just pick a story you find interesting or maybe a German translation of a book you already know. I personally gained a lot by reading Harry Potter in English when I was first learning English.

Listen to music or podcasts:

No matter what your taste in music is, you’ll find German music you love. Listening to music helps you build your vocabulary and passive understanding. Soon enough you’ll sing along and before you know it you have massively improved your German knowledge without even trying.

Watch films with subtitles:

There are lots of German films you could watch with subtitles. This really helps your comprehension and helps you get used to spoken German.

If you need film, book or music recommendations, feel free to message me!

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2 years ago

862 views

What’s the difference between a dialect and an accent?

An accent is a very constrained form of variation. It only affects the pronunciation (i.e. phonetics and phonology) of a speaker. While a speaker of RP (Received Pronunciation) in the South of England (e.g. the Queen) and a speaker of SSE (Scottish Standard English) in Edinburgh (e.g. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon) may pronounce words very differently, they still use the same syntax, lexical items and morphology.

Dialects, on the other hand, vary from the Standard on multiple linguistic levels. Scots, the dialect spoken in Lowland Scotland (Glasgow, Perth, Edinburgh etc, uses different phonetics and phonology than Standard English (e.g. rhotic /r/), but also different vocabulary (think of Aye, Nay, wee, nooks and crannies etc) and syntax (there is a plural form yous for the second person).

Note that there is no clear consensus where a dialect ends and a language begins so Scots is sometimes also characterised as a language.

An accent is a very constrained form of variation. It only affects the pronunciation (i.e. phonetics and phonology) of a speaker. While a speaker of RP (Received Pronunciation) in the South of England (e.g. the Queen) and a speaker of SSE (Scottish Standard English) in Edinburgh (e.g. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon) may pronounce words very differently, they still use the same syntax, lexical items and morphology.

Dialects, on the other hand, vary from the Standard on multiple linguistic levels. Scots, the dialect spoken in Lowland Scotland (Glasgow, Perth, Edinburgh etc, uses different phonetics and phonology than Standard English (e.g. rhotic /r/), but also different vocabulary (think of Aye, Nay, wee, nooks and crannies etc) and syntax (there is a plural form yous for the second person).

Note that there is no clear consensus where a dialect ends and a language begins so Scots is sometimes also characterised as a language.

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2 years ago

949 views

What’s the difference between descriptivism and prescriptivism?

Descriptive rules try to describe how native speakers of a language use it, while prescriptive rules tell speakers how they should use language.

Many people think that it is “better English” to say “To whom were you talking?” rather than “Who were you talking to?”. The underlying “rule”, “Don’t put a preposition at the end of the sentence” is a prescriptive rule. However, it is perfectly grammatical (i.e. possible) to put a preposition at the end of a sentence (such as in the example above). It is thus a descriptive rule to say that in English you can put a preposition at the end of a sentence.

Descriptive rules try to describe how native speakers of a language use it, while prescriptive rules tell speakers how they should use language.

Many people think that it is “better English” to say “To whom were you talking?” rather than “Who were you talking to?”. The underlying “rule”, “Don’t put a preposition at the end of the sentence” is a prescriptive rule. However, it is perfectly grammatical (i.e. possible) to put a preposition at the end of a sentence (such as in the example above). It is thus a descriptive rule to say that in English you can put a preposition at the end of a sentence.

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2 years ago

3162 views

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