Krupa R. GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry tu...

Krupa R.

£18 - £22 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Medicine (Bachelors) - Oxford, Lincoln College University

MyTutor guarantee

Contact Krupa

About me

Hi, I'm Krupa - a medical student at Lincoln College, Oxford. I want to be a tutor because I really enjoy teaching and I'm passionate about studying Science and am keen to share this interest with others. 

However, I understand that scientific concepts can be quite difficult to grasp and would like to tackle this challenge by catering to a wide range of learning styles and addressing individual concerns that you may have during the tutorial.

A tutorial would ideally involve going over concepts that the student feels they are struggling with, as well as dipping into more challenging topics if the student feels they would like to try thinking a bit more ‘outside the box’.

I am also happy to help with applications to Medical School and offer advice regarding personal statements. Having been through this process and having applied to a number of Universities with different requirements of the applicant, I know how intimidating, but also exciting this can be!

I consider myself to be friendly, approachable and patient. I am also receptive to any feedback that you may have about the tutorials and am keen to hone my teaching skills accordingly. 

Hi, I'm Krupa - a medical student at Lincoln College, Oxford. I want to be a tutor because I really enjoy teaching and I'm passionate about studying Science and am keen to share this interest with others. 

However, I understand that scientific concepts can be quite difficult to grasp and would like to tackle this challenge by catering to a wide range of learning styles and addressing individual concerns that you may have during the tutorial.

A tutorial would ideally involve going over concepts that the student feels they are struggling with, as well as dipping into more challenging topics if the student feels they would like to try thinking a bit more ‘outside the box’.

I am also happy to help with applications to Medical School and offer advice regarding personal statements. Having been through this process and having applied to a number of Universities with different requirements of the applicant, I know how intimidating, but also exciting this can be!

I consider myself to be friendly, approachable and patient. I am also receptive to any feedback that you may have about the tutorials and am keen to hone my teaching skills accordingly. 

Show more

DBS Icon

Enhanced DBS Check

27/11/2015

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A*
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
BMATUni admission test5.8

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£20 /hr
ChemistryA Level£20 /hr
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
-Medical School Preparation-Mentoring£22 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Krupa has answered

How much scientific interest should I demonstrate in a Medicine personal statement?

Medicine personal statements should generally include some evidence of you independently pursuing any scientific interests that you have may have. This may include reading popular science literature, doing an extended project or attending lectures/talks. The amount of weighting that you give this in your personal statement depends largely on the expectations of the specific Universities that you are applying to. For an Oxbridge application for example, it is generally advised to include at least one large paragraph on this matter with some specific reference to a topic or idea that you found particularly striking in the book or lecture to demonstrate that you engaged with it. However, it is important not to forget the social aspect of Medicine and you will likely get brownie points for integrating the scientific and social allure that Medicine has for you, for example by dwelling on the social implications of a piece of research that you have read about. 

Medicine personal statements should generally include some evidence of you independently pursuing any scientific interests that you have may have. This may include reading popular science literature, doing an extended project or attending lectures/talks. The amount of weighting that you give this in your personal statement depends largely on the expectations of the specific Universities that you are applying to. For an Oxbridge application for example, it is generally advised to include at least one large paragraph on this matter with some specific reference to a topic or idea that you found particularly striking in the book or lecture to demonstrate that you engaged with it. However, it is important not to forget the social aspect of Medicine and you will likely get brownie points for integrating the scientific and social allure that Medicine has for you, for example by dwelling on the social implications of a piece of research that you have read about. 

Show more

1 year ago

733 views

What are the different types of isomers?

Structural isomers are compounds with the same molecular formula but different structural formulae. They can be :

1. Carbon chain isomers that differ in the length of the carbon chain

2. Positional isomers that have the same functional group, but in different positions on the carbon skeleton

3. Functional group isomers that are members of different homologous series and hence have different functional groups, e.g. methoxymethane and ethanol

Stereoisomers have the same structural formula, but the atoms in these compounds have differing spatial arrangements. There are two types of stereoisomerism :

1. Geometric isomerism is caused by the presence of a functional group that restricts rotation. It is also called cis-/trans- isomerism or E/Z isomerism.

2. Optical isomers/ enantiomers are non-superimposable mirror images of each other meaning that they exist as right- and left- handed structures. 

Structural isomers are compounds with the same molecular formula but different structural formulae. They can be :

1. Carbon chain isomers that differ in the length of the carbon chain

2. Positional isomers that have the same functional group, but in different positions on the carbon skeleton

3. Functional group isomers that are members of different homologous series and hence have different functional groups, e.g. methoxymethane and ethanol

Stereoisomers have the same structural formula, but the atoms in these compounds have differing spatial arrangements. There are two types of stereoisomerism :

1. Geometric isomerism is caused by the presence of a functional group that restricts rotation. It is also called cis-/trans- isomerism or E/Z isomerism.

2. Optical isomers/ enantiomers are non-superimposable mirror images of each other meaning that they exist as right- and left- handed structures. 

Show more

1 year ago

700 views

What is a genetic mutation?

A mutation is a random change in the amount of DNA or sequence of DNA nucleotides within a cell. DNA is a double helix with two polynucleotide strands joined by hydrogen bonds between complementary base pairs. This structure is usually very stable, but mutations can randomly occur during DNA replication and also in the presence of mutagens (e.g. ionising radiation). Genetic mutations involve insertions, deletions, substitutions, inversions, changes in the number of repeat units, deamination (e.g. cytosine can be deaminated to form uracil) or depurination (resulting in the conversion of a nucleotide into a sugar-phosphate residue). 

A mutation is a random change in the amount of DNA or sequence of DNA nucleotides within a cell. DNA is a double helix with two polynucleotide strands joined by hydrogen bonds between complementary base pairs. This structure is usually very stable, but mutations can randomly occur during DNA replication and also in the presence of mutagens (e.g. ionising radiation). Genetic mutations involve insertions, deletions, substitutions, inversions, changes in the number of repeat units, deamination (e.g. cytosine can be deaminated to form uracil) or depurination (resulting in the conversion of a nucleotide into a sugar-phosphate residue). 

Show more

1 year ago

702 views

Arrange a free video meeting


To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Krupa

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok