Beth W. A Level English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tut...

Beth W.

£36 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: English Literature (Bachelors) - Cambridge University

5.0
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96 reviews| 134 completed tutorials

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About me

I'm currently on a year out from university for family reasons so I'm taking on longer term students who'd like guaranteed support during exam season! I am currently a second-year student at the University of Cambridge reading English literature. Throughout GCSE and A-Level English literature I accrued full marks in every formal, externally marked assessment. I have a limitless passion for my subject and strive to make it fun, accessible and straightforward to students. For literature, I can work on text analyses of poems, plays and passages of text, essay planning and writing, stylistic feedback and more. I also have experience with writing and applying to Cambridge, a process I now help prospective applicants with within the university as a member of my college committees.  What can you expect from me? A thorough initial meeting in which I will find out from you the key details I need to build up a picture of how I can help you. This will include the exam board you are being assessed by, any recent marks or feedback you've had from your teachers, and most importantly how you are feeling about the subject. Often students do have a fairly good idea of what's going right or wrong, they just don't have courage in their convictions due to merciless exam boards!  Fun and engaging lessons One size does not fit all! Some students will build up confidence through being guided through exam-style questions, whereas some prefer a different approach. This could be talking through the literature or subject, investigating and discussing, using prompt and flash cards, videos and other multimedia resources. The My Tutor Web lesson space is excellent for this, allowing me to import in extracts, poems, sources and essays. Then we can look and work through them together.  Assessment and independent work Equally important as the sessions you'll have with me, are the times you will spend working independently. After all, I can't come into the exam with you! This could include you reading through extracts and doing some annotation to time, planning exam answers, or simply just doing the grunt work of learning dates, language features and all the other things we're expected to have in our head during exams!  That's all from me! I hope to hear from you soon, and don't hesitate to ask me if there are any questions or queries you have. 

I'm currently on a year out from university for family reasons so I'm taking on longer term students who'd like guaranteed support during exam season! I am currently a second-year student at the University of Cambridge reading English literature. Throughout GCSE and A-Level English literature I accrued full marks in every formal, externally marked assessment. I have a limitless passion for my subject and strive to make it fun, accessible and straightforward to students. For literature, I can work on text analyses of poems, plays and passages of text, essay planning and writing, stylistic feedback and more. I also have experience with writing and applying to Cambridge, a process I now help prospective applicants with within the university as a member of my college committees.  What can you expect from me? A thorough initial meeting in which I will find out from you the key details I need to build up a picture of how I can help you. This will include the exam board you are being assessed by, any recent marks or feedback you've had from your teachers, and most importantly how you are feeling about the subject. Often students do have a fairly good idea of what's going right or wrong, they just don't have courage in their convictions due to merciless exam boards!  Fun and engaging lessons One size does not fit all! Some students will build up confidence through being guided through exam-style questions, whereas some prefer a different approach. This could be talking through the literature or subject, investigating and discussing, using prompt and flash cards, videos and other multimedia resources. The My Tutor Web lesson space is excellent for this, allowing me to import in extracts, poems, sources and essays. Then we can look and work through them together.  Assessment and independent work Equally important as the sessions you'll have with me, are the times you will spend working independently. After all, I can't come into the exam with you! This could include you reading through extracts and doing some annotation to time, planning exam answers, or simply just doing the grunt work of learning dates, language features and all the other things we're expected to have in our head during exams!  That's all from me! I hope to hear from you soon, and don't hesitate to ask me if there are any questions or queries you have. 

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 96 customer reviews
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Nurin (Student)

I honestly enjoyed my tutor session with Beth, as she was someone that I felt really comfortable to ask for help with my work and she made the lessons according to what kind of learning style to what I liked. I didn't feel like a lesson, more a like an educational discussion about a topic that we had common interest, so I actually learnt about more by talking with Beth than I ever did in class (especially when there's other classmates in your class who likes to ask the teacher a lottt of questions). Beth is a very flexible, thoughtful and has a good understanding and method in teaching students, just like me, the right way to learn things. I would totally recommend having her as a tutor.

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Tracey (Parent)

Beth is incredibly lovely and was an amazing tutor. When my grades at AS knocked my confidence in English Literature, Beth helped me to gain it back throughout the year and get me into my first choice University. Beth's lessons were always tailored completely toward what I felt I needed to work on most whilst consistently making them challenging yet thoroughly enjoyable, I could not recommend her more. Thank you Beth!

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Tracey (Parent)

June 12 2017

So helpful!! Love these sessions

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Heylia (Parent)

May 14 2017

Very detailed and helpful

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English literature A-level (A2)A*
History A-level (A2)A*
Biology A-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
English LiteratureA Level£36 /hr
BiologyGCSE£36 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£36 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£36 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£36 /hr
HistoryGCSE£36 /hr
-Oxbridge Preparation-Mentoring£36 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£36 /hr
.ELATUni Admissions Test£36 /hr

Questions Beth has answered

How do I approach an unseen text at GCSE?

The most important thing to remember at GCSE is clarity and confidence. When you first encounter your unseen text, it can be overwhelming, but it's important to remember that once you're in the exam, you can focus on what you know and recognise in the text, not what you don't understand. My first tip is, put your pen down! This might seem counterintuitive, but if you read through the passage several times without forcing yourself to plan or write, you'll crystallise a much better understanding of what's actually going on. After this point, and before planning, having half a mind to the mark scheme for your answer is best. There is no point in preparing for a long essay answer if the question only called for an analysis of specific features or characters! For a generalised commentary, it's worth taking a few different colours of highlighter into the exam (remember, your exam paper is your own, you can scribble and colour and all you need!). Here, you can pick out language features that you've revised and prepared when you've studied, highlight them. Then you can pick out structural features. Any passage or poem will have an arc to what is going on, so you can then jot down in the margins what is happening. Finally, preparing an introductory sentence to summarise what is going on, and a concluding one to round off how these language features and structures contribute to the meaning of the passage will make the main body of your essay have a clear direction. From there, planning two or three clear paragraphs and assigning features you'll comment on to each will make your essay much easier to write, and the initial overwhelm of an unseen text seem a distant memory. 

The most important thing to remember at GCSE is clarity and confidence. When you first encounter your unseen text, it can be overwhelming, but it's important to remember that once you're in the exam, you can focus on what you know and recognise in the text, not what you don't understand. My first tip is, put your pen down! This might seem counterintuitive, but if you read through the passage several times without forcing yourself to plan or write, you'll crystallise a much better understanding of what's actually going on. After this point, and before planning, having half a mind to the mark scheme for your answer is best. There is no point in preparing for a long essay answer if the question only called for an analysis of specific features or characters! For a generalised commentary, it's worth taking a few different colours of highlighter into the exam (remember, your exam paper is your own, you can scribble and colour and all you need!). Here, you can pick out language features that you've revised and prepared when you've studied, highlight them. Then you can pick out structural features. Any passage or poem will have an arc to what is going on, so you can then jot down in the margins what is happening. Finally, preparing an introductory sentence to summarise what is going on, and a concluding one to round off how these language features and structures contribute to the meaning of the passage will make the main body of your essay have a clear direction. From there, planning two or three clear paragraphs and assigning features you'll comment on to each will make your essay much easier to write, and the initial overwhelm of an unseen text seem a distant memory. 

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1 year ago

729 views

How do I study for a closed book examination at A Level?

The aim of the game with a closed book examination is to test your memory, knowledge and understanding of a text, things you should have built upon in class over the year. However, the thought of having to write an examined essay without your trusty, well-worn annotated copy can induce nightmares in even the most confident A-Level student. Thorough learning of the text through plot diagrams, character profiles then careful selection of quotes will have you writing essays with confidence in no time. The first tip, which should almost go without saying is, make sure you've actually read the whole book, cover to cover, at least once! Once you've done that, then feel free to move onto the more fun film adaptations to refresh your memory... A quick search on YouTube can also dig up lots of people commenting on the book or even making plot summaries for you. Try first to summarise the book in twelve sentences, then be discriminating about which points were most important to the plot and development. Every exam board deals with closed book questions differently, so it's important that you understand whether you'll be asked on a theme, section of a book, character or even a sentence from literary theory you need to agree/disagree with. Knowing this, you can select quotes to learn. There are no magic tricks to wrote learning quotes, but there are lots of things you can try to make it easier. A computer or phone app can give you flashcards with trigger words and a scoring system based on how well you feel like you recalled quote. Good examples are Brainscape or Memrise but there are so many for every platform. Equally, if you prefer a pen and paper approach this works. Stick post-it notes or larger A4 posters with your quotes around your room or house, and if your family are willing, you can always get them to quiz you! Writing them out, covering them up and trying to write them again can be boring but also helps activate muscle memory which can be invaluable in the exam. Once you've got your quotes and themes, it's time to think about how you'll approach an exam question and ensure your answers don't sound contrived! 

The aim of the game with a closed book examination is to test your memory, knowledge and understanding of a text, things you should have built upon in class over the year. However, the thought of having to write an examined essay without your trusty, well-worn annotated copy can induce nightmares in even the most confident A-Level student. Thorough learning of the text through plot diagrams, character profiles then careful selection of quotes will have you writing essays with confidence in no time. The first tip, which should almost go without saying is, make sure you've actually read the whole book, cover to cover, at least once! Once you've done that, then feel free to move onto the more fun film adaptations to refresh your memory... A quick search on YouTube can also dig up lots of people commenting on the book or even making plot summaries for you. Try first to summarise the book in twelve sentences, then be discriminating about which points were most important to the plot and development. Every exam board deals with closed book questions differently, so it's important that you understand whether you'll be asked on a theme, section of a book, character or even a sentence from literary theory you need to agree/disagree with. Knowing this, you can select quotes to learn. There are no magic tricks to wrote learning quotes, but there are lots of things you can try to make it easier. A computer or phone app can give you flashcards with trigger words and a scoring system based on how well you feel like you recalled quote. Good examples are Brainscape or Memrise but there are so many for every platform. Equally, if you prefer a pen and paper approach this works. Stick post-it notes or larger A4 posters with your quotes around your room or house, and if your family are willing, you can always get them to quiz you! Writing them out, covering them up and trying to write them again can be boring but also helps activate muscle memory which can be invaluable in the exam. Once you've got your quotes and themes, it's time to think about how you'll approach an exam question and ensure your answers don't sound contrived! 

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1 year ago

681 views

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