Oliver W. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Economics tutor...

Oliver W.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Economics (Bachelors) - Cambridge University

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About me

About Me:

I am an economics student at the University of Cambridge. I recieved a 1st in my first year and, before this, I spent a gap-year working at the Bank of England, in the Parliamentary Affairs Department. This provided me with invaluable experience of applying academic economics to real-world events.

In my final year at school I won a national economics compeition; The Times - Bank of England - Target 2.0 Challenge. I was captain of our team, and the video of our final presentation performed at the Bank of England can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hZtJicRQ0.

Sessions:

Economics: At school I really benefited from enthusiastic and engaging teachers, who applied vague economic concepts to real-life economic events. Not only did this greatly enhance my understanding of the subject, it also sparked an interest that led me to puruse the subject at university. In my tutorials, my aim is to provide a similar experience, ensuring you turn up to the exam not only with an understanding of economics, but also the real-world knowledge that will make you stand out to the examiner. I am familiar with AQA, Edexcel and Pre-U exams.

Maths: A large part of my economics degree involves the application of maths, so I am more than happy to provide tutoring in this, particualy on Stats and Core. I have found that working through problems is the most effective way to learn, and so once we have reached a level of basic understanding, I can set questions for you to work through before the session.

Personal statement/Oxbridge preparation: I have been through the Oxbridge application process twice, so I understand how stressful and confusing it can be. I can provide advice on personal statements, to ensure your knowledge and interest comes across to the Director of Studies. I can also provide mock interviews, ranging from general ones to more maths based ones, very common at Cambridge.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Economics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Economics GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
EconomicsA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 2 customer reviews

Hassan (Parent) August 21 2016

Very informative, well prepared and doesn't mind repeating over as much times as you need or changing his approach until you understand

Lucia (Student) July 31 2016

Questions Oliver has answered

Evaluate policies the government can use to increase the rate of economic growth.

Start by defining key terms "rate of economic growth" - the annual percentage increase in real GDP, which is one of the government's main macroeconomic objectives. I would approach this question by considering the two main types of policy the government can use: demand side (which aim to incr...

Start by defining key terms

"rate of economic growth" - the annual percentage increase in real GDP, which is one of the government's main macroeconomic objectives.

I would approach this question by considering the two main types of policy the government can use: demand side (which aim to increase AD) or supply side (which aim to shift out LRAS).

Lets consider one of each.

Demand side - we could consider either monetary policy of fiscal policy. Given time constraints in the exam, it may be worth only considering one. I will evaluate monetary policy.

The Bank of Egland could lower interest rates to increase the rate of economic growth. By lowering Bank Rate (called expansionary monetary policy), this will lead to a lower LIBOR (London Inter Bank Offer Rate - the rate at which banks lend to each other). Through banks, this will then be passed on to other rates, such as mortgages, credit cards and business loans. As a result, consumers will borrow more,increasing consumption, a component of AD (around 65%).Similarly, businesses will borrow more, increasing investment. Both of these will serve to increase the rate of economic growth (can be shown by a shift out in the AD curve on an AD/LRAS diagram). You could also mention the positive multiplier effects that could result from this policy.

EV - I reccomend doing two paragraphs of evaluation for each policy (if you have time). For this policy, you could discuss: the differing impacts between short and long run, how monetary policy is already very expansionary and potential conflicts with other macroeconomic objectives.

Supply side - these policies aim to shift out the LRAS curve and expand the economy in a non inflationary way. An example could be increased expenditure on education and training, increasing the human capital of the workforce. Or increasing the age of compulsory education. This would increase the productivity of the labour force, increasing the demand for labour because it is more skilled, increasing consumption. This would also reduce unemployment, another of the government's main macroeconomic objectives.

EV - there are loads of great evaluation points for supply side policies. You could discuss the large time-lag (often many years) before they have any impact and the opportunity cost of the expenditure involved, especially in a time of fiscal restraint. 

Conclusion - the key to any good A-level essay is to have a strong conclusion. You need to sum up your points and then provide a balanced judgement, saying which policy you think would be the best and why. This is often a good place to mention other policies that you did not have time to consider in depth (but only briefly mention - don't go into too much detail).  So in this case, you may conclude that whilst SSPs grow the economy in a non-inflationery way and make the economy more internationally competitive, the extensive time lag associated with them makes them unsuitable for short-term demand managment. So which policy you choose depends on how quickly you want the rate of economic growth to increase (make sure you always refer the conlusion back to the origional question)

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5 months ago

224 views

What can I expect in a Cambridge economics interview?

So this, of course, depends on the particular college you applied to, but there are some general themes that you can expect to encounter.  1) You will probably have some form of general interview, often with a non-economist. This is to gauge your level of interest in economics and how well yo...

So this, of course, depends on the particular college you applied to, but there are some general themes that you can expect to encounter. 

1) You will probably have some form of general interview, often with a non-economist. This is to gauge your level of interest in economics and how well you would suit Cambridge. They might ask "What economics book have you been reading", and then ask you to expand on some of the key points of the book or challenge the conclusions. Be prepared for the basic questions such as "Why economics" or "Why Cambridge".

2) The Cambridge economics course is very heavy in maths (1 of the 5 papers we take in first year is entirely dedicated to maths and stats). Therefore, it is worth revising key maths concepts from C1-4 (especially if you have taken a gap year). But also be prepared for these concepts to be applied to economics.

For example, they may give you a cost function and a demand function, and then ask you to calculate the revenue function (so Price*Quantity - Quantity*Cost(per-unit)). Then, they may ask you to maximise this function, taking first derivates to find at what quantity profit is maximised. You should then also prove that this is a maximum, by taking second derivatives. So whilst the acutal maths may not be that hard (basic differentiation) the interviewers may apply it to unfamiliar situations. 

Graph sketching is also very common, as is integration.

3) At the end of the interview, they will usually ask if you have any questions. It is worth thinking about this beforehand, so you have some questions ready to ask. But make sure these aren't too obvious, or anything you could have easily found on the College's website.

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5 months ago

478 views
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