Katie J. GCSE Geography tutor, A Level Geography tutor, GCSE Biology ...

Katie J.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Geography MSci (Masters) - Durham University

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About me

About Me

I am a physical geography student at Durham University. I have always been fascinated by the world that surrounds us, the physical processes that forms it and the interactions we have with the Earth and each other. I hope that my tutorials will increase your understanding of biological and geographical processes and instil a love for these amazing subjects in you. 

I am very open and friendly person and a patient teacher. Through past internships and work experience I have worked with people of a number of ages. In terms of previous tutoring experience I have tutored Mathematics to Year 2 and Year 4 students, Geography to GCSE students and Biology to A-Level students. 

Having worked as a young leader in the Girl Guides as well as my previous tutoring experience, this has allowed me to develop a number of different and encouraging teaching techniques.

The Sessions

In geography and the sciences a basic understanding is key in order to build upon. These sessions are for you, therefore you will guide what we cover during the time. We will cover all the key areas of a topic or test your understanding before attempting exam questions. 

To ensure deep understanding of all concepts and theories I will use a number of different methods such as diagrams, memorable rhymes, analogies and case studies to explain until you are confident with the topic. 

In my experience, encouraging students to explore beyond the curriculum allows the pupil to have more confidence in their exams and they are able to impart additional knowledge that will impress the examiner. 

What next?

If you have any problems or questions, please get in touch by either sending me a 'Webmail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'. Both of these are accessible through the website. Don't forget to tell me what you're struggling with and the exam board. 

Looking forwards to meeting you! 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Geography A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Geography GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
GeographyA-LevelA
MathematicsA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA
Extended Project QualificationA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 28 customer reviews

Connor (Student) September 5 2016

Very informative and knowledgeable tutor. Covers many aspects of the subject from different angles thoroughly.

Annie (Student) December 1 2016

Connor (Student) November 29 2016

Connor (Student) November 28 2016

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Questions Katie has answered

What are some example of global commons?

First of all understanding of what a common space is is crucial for looking at examples of those that are global. A classic example of a common area is common grazing land within a community but the questions you then need to ask are: Can anyone access the commons? - in some cases YES, a total...

First of all understanding of what a common space is is crucial for looking at examples of those that are global. A classic example of a common area is common grazing land within a community but the questions you then need to ask are:

Can anyone access the commons? - in some cases YES, a total free-for-all but in other cases they belong to a community.

Can you do anything in the commons? For example you may be allowed to graze but not to build infrastructure.

Are there limits on inidividual use so that all can use it? This is relevant if the commons has exhautible resources. 

Does the community of users 'own' the commons to the point that they can it oss (to one of their own or others)?

Is all enforcement on the commons official?

Is it nobody's or everybody's?

Therefore we can then think about the global commons which are common areas at a global scale. All parts of the planet with permanent settlement are bound within soverign state territories and therefore at the global scale land is not common. However there are spaces on the Earth that have one of more global common properties, these include: ocean (water and sea-bed), air (inner atmosphere and outer space) and celestial bodies and Antarctica

The oceans as a global commons is complicated as they are a mix of inexhaustible and exhaustible (e.g. fish) resources and they also have coastal interests (e.g. ecosystem services the ocean provides).  The resources in the ocean are separated at different depths, for example ships on the surface providing transport, fish in the water column and oil rigs tapping into resources below the sea bed. The 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and divides the ocean into four key regions. 1. Territorial Waters (0-12 nautical miles from land), this is not common but a common right to naviagation is recognised and is therefore an extension of the territory (the ships do not have a right to dock etc... but they have the right to innocent passage). 2. Exclusive economic zone (12-200 nautical miles), common but the coastal state has exclusive right to exhaustible resources. Policing here is different to area 1 as police are not allowed to board ships unless they have reasons such as: piracy, slave trade, illegal broadcasting or they believe the ship is sailing under a different flag. 3. High Seas (waters beyond 200 nautical miles) have common access and use but there is no sharing requirement. 4. International Sea Bed (seabed beyond 200 nautical miles) has common access and use but must benefit everyone with the implementation of a sharing mechanism (this includes financial benefits and technological know-how). 

Air is a global commons although cannot be described as infinite due to pollution. The geostationary orbit is a narrow stips of space and things in this space will move at the same speed as Earth such as satellites. This is a space that everyone can use however, due to legal requirements about spacing between objects it is a finite resource. The Inner Atmospheric air space is the same as territorial waters, it is not common but there is a common right to navigation. Outer space on the other hand is a common spacebut the Outer Space Treaty outlined some rules. There is a ban on militarisation therefore does not allow weapons on celestial bodies but it does allow conventional weapons in orbit, satellites and drones fall under this category. Economic ativity if allowed but it must benefit all but does not need to be shared except in the Moon Treaty, for example in the future mining of asteroids or water extraction from planets. 

Many state Antarctica as a global commons however, is one of the worst examples. Unlike other spaces already looked at this space is land so is conceivably terriroty. The area was not seen by man until approximately 1820, it has a harsh climate and as it has no indigenous population the only ones that inhabit the continent are between 1000 and 5000 scientiest depending on the season. Before the treaty seven states made claims to portions of Antarctica (New Zealand, Australia, Argentina, Chile, UK, Norway and France). As Antarctica became a site of impotrance for militarization during the Cold War it's ecological state was put under threat and therefore a treaty was created in 1959. This froze the existing seven claims, banned military or economic activity and allowed any state to conduct research anywhere. Therefore Antarctica is common in terms of access and science but not common as ownership of certain sections is recognized. 

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5 months ago

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What are the vegetation characteristics in Temperate Woodland Biomes?

Temperate deciduous woodland biome is characterized by their seasonal colour change which marks the onset of the autumnal leaf fall. The biome occupies three main formations within the 'mid-latitudes' (40-60 degrees north and south), it isn't completely absent from the southern hemisphere as r...

Temperate deciduous woodland biome is characterized by their seasonal colour change which marks the onset of the autumnal leaf fall. The biome occupies three main formations within the 'mid-latitudes' (40-60 degrees north and south), it isn't completely absent from the southern hemisphere as restricted ecosystems are formed within Australia, New Zealand's South Island and southern Chile. These regions have a long, warm growing season of over 120 days and have at least five months frost-free, extreme weather conditions are rare. 

In temperate deciduous woodland biomes trees shed their leaves in the winter in response to the fall in temperature and an anticipated need to conserve water. Undisturbed forest nowadays is rare but the forests still tend to show good diversity with over ten different species of trees per hectare. The majority of these tree species belong to the broadleaf deciduous group and have large crowns yet there may be the occasional stand of an evergreen conifer (e.g. hemlock, spruce, fir). In certain areas, individual species can dominate such as beech, elm or oak. The vegetation cover in forests depends largely on the soil type as acidic soils give rise to species such as Birch whilst alkaline soils support Box and Maple. Willow and Alder dominate in wetter areas that are near to streams and pond whilst Oak thrives in most habitats as extremely tolerant. Ground cover and the under storey layer of the woodland are dominated by shrubs, bushes and wildflowers. 

The vegetation in this biome has adapted to cold winters in a variety of ways. Trees have developed thick bark that helps to insulated against low temperatures and wind chill, winter dormancy is another adaptation that reduces transpiration and therefore moisture uptake when the soil is frozen. Leaf fall helps to prevent frostbite damage, reduces water loss and reduces the likelihood of branches being broken under the weight of snow. Thin broad leaves maximise sunlight capture and photosynthesis whilst their deep, wide spreading roots maximises soil moisture capture.

Dead wood plays a major role in these habitats as half of all woodland fauna depends on it. They provide a microhabitat for fungi and lichen, food and shelter for invertebrates and mosses. Many woodland birds nest within dead trees. 

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5 months ago

211 views

What is a reflex arc?

A reflex arc describes what controls a reflex reaction in humans. When something happens to an organism that needs a quick response a reflex action occurs. It allows the action to be 'unthinking'. A stimuli (such as heat) causes a receptor to send an impulse along the sensory neurone to the sp...

A reflex arc describes what controls a reflex reaction in humans. When something happens to an organism that needs a quick response a reflex action occurs. It allows the action to be 'unthinking'. A stimuli (such as heat) causes a receptor to send an impulse along the sensory neurone to the spinal cord (central nervous system/CNS). The signal crosses the synapse between the sensory neurone and relay neurone using chemicals. The relay neurone transmits the singal through the CNS and across a synapse to a motor neurone, this then allows the movement of the muscle or effector to move the body out of harms way.

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5 months ago

186 views
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