Aline  D. IB English Literature tutor, IB English Language tutor, A L...

Aline D.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Criminology (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

I was part of the selected peer-tutor board in both The Heritage Private School (Cyprus), and the International School of Curitiba (Brazil). When I moved to Brazil, I also found the opportunity to teach foreigners conversational Portuguese as well as helping out with music theory and singing lessons in a music school. 

In the Heritage Private School, I finished my Cambridge IGCSEs in 2011, with the combined highest grade in English Literature (100%) and the highest grade in Portuguese Second Language. In total, I conjured up 4 A*s, 5As, 3Bs and a C (in mathematics). Immediately after, I moved to Brazil, where I was put under a rigorous 3-diploma system: American High School Diploma (along with SATI&II), the Brazilian Secondary School Diploma and the IB. In the IB, I chose 3HL and 3SL subjects. My HL subjects were English Language and Literature, History and Portuguese B, for which I got a 7, 6, 7, respectively. 

As a university fresher, I am quite busy - NOT!  So, I have quite a bit of time on my hands for most of the day and night, allowing me to be available (probably), around any time convenient for the tutee. Mondays and Tuesdays are my 'heavy days', but even then I might have 1 hour to spare here and there, and I am almost always frees in the evenings after 7pm. 

Not too sure I've conveyed my rather "anti-shy" (as a close friend once called me), nature. However, it is exactly this trait that helped me develop my aims. Of course, most people come to tutoring wanting to improve grades, or wanting support in a subject that might require a little more attention. That is, of course, my aim as well. Without a doubt, improvement is important and there is little point for tutoring to happen if it does not help the tutee improve. However, I have yet another aim, which involves completing my "five steps to success". These go as follows:
1) Love the subject - nothing will be achieved if you fight back.
2) Elevate confidence - even the best warriors wouldn't be able to fight if they're shaking to the bone.
3) Accept defeat - one bad grade means only one thing: improvement is near!
4) Rule - don't understand something, own it. Once it's owned, nothing can take it away.
5) NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE!

With those set in stone, the basic aims within a single tutoring session is to, initially, create a relationship of mutual trust between both parts and, of course, to alleviate some of the tension and discomfort present when a student does not like or does not understand something. As mentioned above, nothing is impossible, and my aim is really to remind the tutee of that and work from there, picking up the lost bits and helping them piece the puzzle creating an image which they can understand.

I have worked with 10-year-old children, and people who were older than me (adults). What I have found is that I am not put off easily. I always find a way to maneuver around their dodge balls and hit them with a hard dose of L.E.A.R.N.. Obviously, I also believe I am qualified to teach the subjects mentioned in my list, as not only have I excelled in them personally and academically, but I have had experience with tutoring in these subjects before and have had positive responses. Indeed, I might seem a little mad, but there is a method to my madness - and a method that seems to work. 

However, working with people, I believe the most important thing I have to offer is a friendly ear. I listen to the tutee, what they have to say, how they want to do it, and adapt. There is no right and wrong and everybody is different. No two people are alike and often it is that misconception within the school system, which brings kids to believe they are not smart enough. By listening to their voices, I usually seem to realise the problem doesn't lie in some "lack of capability", but in a sense of hopelessness, which is easy to fix with time, and patience and hard work - all of which I can certainly guarantee will improve grades and boost confidence, all in one.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Literature A Level £20 /hr
Portuguese A Level £20 /hr
English GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Music GCSE £18 /hr
Portuguese GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr
English Language IB £20 /hr
English Literature IB £20 /hr
History IB £20 /hr
Portuguese IB £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English A2 HLBaccalaureate7
Portguese B HLBaccalaureate7
History HLBaccalaureate6
Maths SLBaccalaureate4
Biology SLBaccalaureate5
SpanishBachelors Degree72%
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Aline has answered

How do I improve a non-native language?

 Sure, writing is important, but reading, listening and conversation with others who are doing the same language are far less frustrating ways to learn a language. I know, learning 5 languages through my life, that writing was always more difficult because you might not know the spelling or th...

 Sure, writing is important, but reading, listening and conversation with others who are doing the same language are far less frustrating ways to learn a language. I know, learning 5 languages through my life, that writing was always more difficult because you might not know the spelling or the vocabulary - it's a lot easier to get caught up and doubt your abilities like that. So by creating a situation in which either you're passivley taking in the language (reading or listening) to learn pronounciation and spelling, or in a more relaxed environment with someone you're not afraid of messing up infront of (for conversational purposes), you start building your confidence and slowly but surely, your language skills improve!

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2 years ago

284 views

What is the best way for revising for GCSE literature?

From personal experience, I believe the best way for revising for literature is kowing the works. This does not mean know the plot and the names of the characters (even though that's a start...). By know, I mean know emotions and feel the works you study. Therefore, read them, read them again,...

From personal experience, I believe the best way for revising for literature is kowing the works. This does not mean know the plot and the names of the characters (even though that's a start...). By know, I mean know emotions and feel the works you study. Therefore, read them, read them again, and then start picking out things that link you with the main character. 

Then, whilst writing an essay, it will be easier to come up with analysis and interpretations of text - not only because you will know what you are saying, but also because you can make a judgement based on yourself and how you percieve the universe the protagonists (and antagonists) live in. 

I find the best way to do this is reading it out loud, possibly with friends. Second best way? Read it and discuss. Even if you think it is far-fetched and 'wrong', say it! Then you start to realise that you can argue your way out of anything, because to you, what you think is real. And that is the beauty with literature: there is no right or wrong... everything is correct as long as you can back it up!

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2 years ago

345 views
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