Annabel T.

Annabel T.

£22 - £26 /hr

History (Bachelors) - St Peter's College, Oxford University

5.0
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9 reviews

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22 completed lessons

About me

Hi, I'm Annabel. I'm a graduate of the University of Oxford having studied for a BA in History. I have a varied academic background, having studied mathematics (including further mathematics modules), chemistry, physics, and history at A-level. One-quarter of my first year at university was also spent studying a mathematics module. Having a strong STEM background is quite rare for a humanities student, but I feel that it has allowed me to develop a very diverse tutoring style.

I have been tutoring for around 7 years now, most often tutoring students in maths and science GCSEs and history A-level, but I also tutored 11+ students for a number of years so I am happy to consider requests for 11+ tutoring also.

After applying to university and receiving offers from top universities (including Oxford and LSE) I began to tutor students for university admission - both Oxbridge and non-Oxbridge. To date, I have a 100% success rate at getting students into their first choice universities, and have tutored students for entry in the following subjects: History, PPE, Mathematics and Finance, and Biochemistry.

Hi, I'm Annabel. I'm a graduate of the University of Oxford having studied for a BA in History. I have a varied academic background, having studied mathematics (including further mathematics modules), chemistry, physics, and history at A-level. One-quarter of my first year at university was also spent studying a mathematics module. Having a strong STEM background is quite rare for a humanities student, but I feel that it has allowed me to develop a very diverse tutoring style.

I have been tutoring for around 7 years now, most often tutoring students in maths and science GCSEs and history A-level, but I also tutored 11+ students for a number of years so I am happy to consider requests for 11+ tutoring also.

After applying to university and receiving offers from top universities (including Oxford and LSE) I began to tutor students for university admission - both Oxbridge and non-Oxbridge. To date, I have a 100% success rate at getting students into their first choice universities, and have tutored students for entry in the following subjects: History, PPE, Mathematics and Finance, and Biochemistry.

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About my sessions

I don't have a specific, rigid tutoring approach. I think it is important to get to know a student first and see what methods work best for them and adapt my tutoring accordingly. However, there are two tactics that I use across the board. Targeted feedback - a student can't improve unless they know what their specific weaknesses are and how to attack them. Interactive tutoring, as I don't believe that students learn well by just listening to a tutor talk. An example of a combination of these two tactics is asking a student to compare their answer with a model answer and discuss with me what they think the similarities are and what the differences are and how they might incorporate these changes in their own work.

My sessions vary in style depending on whether I am asked to help a student study for a specific exam or if they would just like some more general sessions to help them with a subject. If I'm tutoring for a specific exam I think it is important to look at exam technique as well as knowledge; I take care to research the exams of my students to make sure that sessions are tailored to their exam board and specification. In both cases I work through exam questions with students, so that they can consolidate their knowledge, and so that I can measure their progress. I also think that confidence is key to academic performance, so another way I measure progress is through the confidence of my students.

I don't have a specific, rigid tutoring approach. I think it is important to get to know a student first and see what methods work best for them and adapt my tutoring accordingly. However, there are two tactics that I use across the board. Targeted feedback - a student can't improve unless they know what their specific weaknesses are and how to attack them. Interactive tutoring, as I don't believe that students learn well by just listening to a tutor talk. An example of a combination of these two tactics is asking a student to compare their answer with a model answer and discuss with me what they think the similarities are and what the differences are and how they might incorporate these changes in their own work.

My sessions vary in style depending on whether I am asked to help a student study for a specific exam or if they would just like some more general sessions to help them with a subject. If I'm tutoring for a specific exam I think it is important to look at exam technique as well as knowledge; I take care to research the exams of my students to make sure that sessions are tailored to their exam board and specification. In both cases I work through exam questions with students, so that they can consolidate their knowledge, and so that I can measure their progress. I also think that confidence is key to academic performance, so another way I measure progress is through the confidence of my students.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

5
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9 customer reviews
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Kiran Student Lesson review 26 Oct '17, 17:00

26 Oct, 2017

Annabel has been invaluable in helping me prepare for the HAT. The advice she gave was not only precise and applicable, but also tailored around what I personally needed to improve. It allowed me to better structure my answers and more importantly, feel confident in answering the questions posed. I would highly recommend Annabel to anyone looking for help getting ready with the HAT.

HM
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Harrison Student Lesson review 14 Feb, 18:00

14 Feb

DS
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Daljit Parent from Westcliff On Sea Lesson review 25 Oct '17, 15:00

25 Oct, 2017

KD
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Kiran Student Lesson review 16 Oct '17, 14:15

16 Oct, 2017

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
History Admissions TestUni admission test79
HistoryA-level (A2)A*
MathematicsA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
PhysicsA-level (A2)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
HistoryA Level£24 /hr
HistoryGCSE£22 /hr
Oxbridge PreparationMentoring£24 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£24 /hr
HATUniversity£26 /hr

Questions Annabel has answered

How do I answer an "explain" question?

A question asking you to "explain how" or "explain why" (6 or 8 marks) might seem simpler than the longer-answer questions, but it is still testing the same skills: development of points and analysis. You should aim to discuss 2-3 points. Whilst 2 developed points is often enough, the best answers will touch on three issues to ensure maximum marks in case an examiner doesn't feel one point is developed enough. A vague "Point, Evidence, Explain" structure should be followed; you should make your initial point, back it up with evidence, and then explain and analyse how this relates to the question. The sample answer provides an example of this structure: the first sentence tells the examiner the point you're making, the second sentence backs the point up with evidence and develops it a bit further, and the rest of the paragraph further explains and analyses the issue. Always link your points back to the question. Normally, you are being asked to explain why something happened, or explain the effects of something - to do this you must link your points back to the topic at hand. For example, looking at the sample answer, you can see that the answer explicitly links points back to the answer using clear phrases such as "This meant that the lives of African Americans were changed because...". If possible, develop your analysis by considering limitations to the point you're making (see paragraph 2 of the sample answer) but do not get too hung up on this, these questions are only worth 6-8 marks and it is possible to get full marks without doing this, it just makes your answer appear a bit more sophisticated to examiners if you have managed to do it. These pieces of advice are best demonstrated through a sample answer: Explain how WWII affected the lives of African Americans? (8 marks) One of the ways in which WWII affected the lives of African Americans was in how it developed the civil rights movement. Approximately 125,000 African Americans fought overseas in WWII, and this meant that they were able to see how black populations were treated in other countries. In many cases, such as in Britain and France, black people were not subject to the same level of discrimination and segregation. This meant that African Americans saw their treatment at home as far more unfair, adding impetus to the movement for equal rights. WWII also affected the lives of African Americans because the distinction between “black” and “white” areas of life and professions was blurred – for example, in January 1941 the Women’s Army Corps began to allow Black women to train and join as nurses. This meant that the lives of African Americans were changed because opportunities opened up for them to learn new trades and professions which had previously been restricted to the white population, thus reducing segregation at the professional level. This was, however, limited because a lot of the training and day-to-day activities were still segregated by race. Lastly, WWII affected the lives of African Americans because it increased the proportion of the black population living in urban environments. A large proportion of African Americans had moved to cities whilst they partook in the war effort, and others migrated to the cities after returning from war hoping to find new jobs. This meant that African Americans were able to pursue a broader range of professions – as there were more jobs available in the city – and their lives were changed as the increased density of the black population in urban areas meant that they were able to form their own black communities. A question asking you to "explain how" or "explain why" (6 or 8 marks) might seem simpler than the longer-answer questions, but it is still testing the same skills: development of points and analysis. You should aim to discuss 2-3 points. Whilst 2 developed points is often enough, the best answers will touch on three issues to ensure maximum marks in case an examiner doesn't feel one point is developed enough. A vague "Point, Evidence, Explain" structure should be followed; you should make your initial point, back it up with evidence, and then explain and analyse how this relates to the question. The sample answer provides an example of this structure: the first sentence tells the examiner the point you're making, the second sentence backs the point up with evidence and develops it a bit further, and the rest of the paragraph further explains and analyses the issue. Always link your points back to the question. Normally, you are being asked to explain why something happened, or explain the effects of something - to do this you must link your points back to the topic at hand. For example, looking at the sample answer, you can see that the answer explicitly links points back to the answer using clear phrases such as "This meant that the lives of African Americans were changed because...". If possible, develop your analysis by considering limitations to the point you're making (see paragraph 2 of the sample answer) but do not get too hung up on this, these questions are only worth 6-8 marks and it is possible to get full marks without doing this, it just makes your answer appear a bit more sophisticated to examiners if you have managed to do it. These pieces of advice are best demonstrated through a sample answer: Explain how WWII affected the lives of African Americans? (8 marks) One of the ways in which WWII affected the lives of African Americans was in how it developed the civil rights movement. Approximately 125,000 African Americans fought overseas in WWII, and this meant that they were able to see how black populations were treated in other countries. In many cases, such as in Britain and France, black people were not subject to the same level of discrimination and segregation. This meant that African Americans saw their treatment at home as far more unfair, adding impetus to the movement for equal rights. WWII also affected the lives of African Americans because the distinction between “black” and “white” areas of life and professions was blurred – for example, in January 1941 the Women’s Army Corps began to allow Black women to train and join as nurses. This meant that the lives of African Americans were changed because opportunities opened up for them to learn new trades and professions which had previously been restricted to the white population, thus reducing segregation at the professional level. This was, however, limited because a lot of the training and day-to-day activities were still segregated by race. Lastly, WWII affected the lives of African Americans because it increased the proportion of the black population living in urban environments. A large proportion of African Americans had moved to cities whilst they partook in the war effort, and others migrated to the cities after returning from war hoping to find new jobs. This meant that African Americans were able to pursue a broader range of professions – as there were more jobs available in the city – and their lives were changed as the increased density of the black population in urban areas meant that they were able to form their own black communities.

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2 years ago

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