Contact Suzanne Pauline
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Contact Suzanne Pauline

About me

About me:

Hi everybody! I’m Suzanne and after the summer I’m going into my second year of chemistry at the University of York. Science makes me incredibly excited and I hope to transfer this passion to you!

I’m very patient and enthusiastic and so I will keep on explaining something in as many different ways as possible until you get it. I won’t give up!
I’ve been a scout since I was just six years old and. As I got older I’ve been helping out as a member of staff, so I interact a lot with young people, which I absolutely love.

What to expect:

During the sessions we will focus on what you need, whether this is help with a specific problem or help in general.
As we tackle a specific problem I will also always make sure that you understand the basics. Especially when learning a science, a good foundation is the key to success!
Of course when you’re close to an exam we will focus more on how to tackle an exam question. We will look at previous questions and break them into little pieces to make them more manageable.

The end goal is always to give you the knowledge and self-confidence to tackle anything that’s thrown at you! (All whilst of course having a good time :) )

What now?

If you think that I might be the right fit for you, please send me a message to book a ‘Meet the tutor’ session. This way we can get to know each other and discuss your goals!

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Dutch A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Dutch GCSE £18 /hr
Latin GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry IB £20 /hr
Dutch IB £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryBaccalaureate7
MathsBaccalaureate7
PhysicsBaccalaureate6
BiologyBaccalaureate6
LatinBaccalaureate7
Dutch (for native speakers)Baccalaureate6
English (for non-native speakers)Baccalaureate6
Computer scienceBaccalaureate6
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

4.8from 5 customer reviews

Nina (Student) October 29 2016

Suzanne was very patient and her explanations were clear.

Mariska (Parent) November 13 2016

Nina (Student) November 13 2016

Mariska (Parent) November 6 2016

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Questions Suzanne Pauline has answered

What is the difference in kinetics between a 0th, 1st and 2nd order reaction?

The rate of every reaction, R, relies on many different things including pressure, temperature or concentration of the reactants. To simplify this everything expect for concentration are included in the rate constant,k. Let's now go through the different reaction orders: In a 0th order reacti...

The rate of every reaction, R, relies on many different things including pressure, temperature or concentration of the reactants. To simplify this everything expect for concentration are included in the rate constant, k.

Let's now go through the different reaction orders:

In a 0th order reaction R only depends on k, not on the concentration of any of the reactants:
R = k

In a 1st order reaction R depends on k and on the concentration of one reactant, A:
R = k*[A]

In a 2nd order reaction R depends on k and on the concentration of two reactants, A and B:
R = k*[A]*[B]

In this reaction it is also possible that A and B are two of the same molecules, let’s say A and A, which collide to form the products:
R = k*[A]*[A] which is the same as R = k*[A]2

From the different rate of reaction equations there are some things you can note:

In a 0th order reaction the concentration of the reactants does not matter. When you change the concentration the rate of the reaction will stay the same.

In a 1st order reaction the rate relies on the concentration of one of the reactants. When you increase this concentration the reaction will go faster and when you decrease it the reaction will go slower.

In a 2nd order reaction the rate relies on two different concentrations. When you increase either one the rate of the reaction will increase and when you decrease either one the rate will decrease. Things get a bit trickier when you increase one and decrease the other and it will depend on how much you increase/decrease them whether the rate goes up or down.

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4 months ago

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