Emily O. A Level English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literature tu...

Emily O.

Currently unavailable: until 31/10/2016

Degree: Drama (Bachelors) - Manchester University

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About me

About Me:

I am a student at the University of Manchester studying Drama. It is a very prestigious course, requiring great interpersonal skills, a breadth of knowledge over the various different practises of theatre, film and radio, and an excellent essay writing technique.

I have always had a great passion for plays and literature, which covers all three of my available tutoring subject areas: French, English Literature, English, Theatre Studies and Drama. At A Level, I attained A*, A, B and for my first year at University I achieved a 2:1.

I'm friendly and patient, and I understand that developing a knowledge of a language or a text, or learning a good essay technique can take time! So I'm very prepared to go at your pace and tailor my sessions to your needs. I've tutored friends, my younger brother and his friends. 

My tutoring sessions:

During our sessions, we will go at your pace. We can go through whatever you ask, whether it be ticking off topics on the curriculum  or focussing on particular homeworks or topics that you struggle with. 

In French, we can go through vocabulary lists, practice pronunciation, learn verb forms and word endings in a practical and fun way. In English, we can look at your set texts, look at essay structure and critics (for A Level) and look at particular lines of argument. For Theatre Studies and Drama, I can show you a wealth of resources that have been invaluable to me during my time studying the subject. We can also go through essay questions, talk about practitioners and discuss how to write eloquently about theatrical performances.

I, myself, am a visual worker, so I tend to enjoy making lists, diagrams and plans when studying a particular subject. I'm very happy to go through things thoroughly, until you understand to a level that you can explain it yourself! Learning is all about repetition and enjoyment, and I hope we can bring this out in our sessions!

Personal Statements

I'm very happy to help you write your personal statement - especially if you are applying for a course in English and Drama. I only used the UCAS system a year ago, and was aided by a very helpful careers advisor so I can help you with all things UCAS (I've been taught by the best!). I understand how stressful and time-consuming it can be, so I hope I can pass on some of my advice and tips on how to present yourself to Universities!

Any questions?

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' or send me a 'WebMail'. Let me know what you're struggling with and what course you're doing. Looking forward to meeting you :)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Theatre StudiesA-LevelA
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

31/10/2016

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Questions Emily has answered

How do I go about analysing a Shakespearean Sonnet?

A Shakespearean sonnet is a type of 14-line poem that is written with the same structure that Shakespeare uses for his sonnets. They are written predomenantly with a rhythm scheme called iambic pentameter, in which each line is ten syllables long. In order to discuss analysing Shakespearean so...

A Shakespearean sonnet is a type of 14-line poem that is written with the same structure that Shakespeare uses for his sonnets. They are written predomenantly with a rhythm scheme called iambic pentameter, in which each line is ten syllables long. In order to discuss analysing Shakespearean sonnets, I will use an example of this poetical structure: John Keats' "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be". Keats wrote this poem after intensely studying Shakespeare's poetical works, and thus closely imitates much of his techniques.

First of all, print the poem off the internet and make it a large font with large line spacing. Then, take a different coloured pen for annotation. The key thing to do when analysing these sonnets is to note the structure, and how the structure compliments the subject matter, and vice versa. For example, sonnets are primarily used by poets to express love or desire, but in some cases this undertone is juxtaposed by what the poet is trying to say. In this case, Keats is using the love-poem structure to emphasise his own mutability in contrast with the abundance of literature he has yet to write.

Once you have analysed structure, (eg. written down the rhyme scheme next to the lines, noted the 14 lines, studied the iambic pentameter, thought about the relevance of the 'love poem' structure) you can now begin to analyse how the structure contributes to your interpretation the poem's overall meaning. "When I Have Fears That I May Cease To Be" is in fact all one sentence - only the very last line is end-stopped. This suggests Keats' unfulfilling and worrisome rambling thought about losing his affinity with the world. The whole poem conveys his ambiguous attitude to death - on one hand, it seems a waste and a tragedy - but on the other, he seems to suggest that it would be a form of escapist relief. Keats' use of the word "when" to begin the poem suggests that his fears about death consistently plague him. The final two lines of the poem are a rhyming couplet, emphasising the finality of death that Keats so fears.

The next step in analysing the sonnet is to have a look at the language. Keep an eye out for internal rhyme, metaphors, use of adjectives, symbolism, who the poet is addressing and cross-literary references. Write all your thoughts about the poem down underneath it. One point to note about this poem is how Keats' personification of nature combats conventional religious ideas of an afterlife, implying that all that awaits us is oblivion. For the Romantic poets, Christianity destroyed the naive visionary power of a mythic relation to nature, and thus Keats purposely omits any Christian references from his poem.

The final step for an A-Level student is to research critical perspectives. Have a look on websites such as Google Scholar, or visit an academic library. 

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5 months ago

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In the perfect (past) tense, when do I use avoir and when do I use être?

Most perfect tense (passé-composé) verbs use 'avoir' when put in the past tense, for example: J'ai fait = I did Elle a ouvri = she opened Ils ont dit = they said However, there is a list of verbs in the past tense that use être. This might seem confusing, however, there is a very easy way of ...

Most perfect tense (passé-composé) verbs use 'avoir' when put in the past tense, for example:

J'ai fait = I did
Elle a ouvri = she opened
Ils ont dit = they said

However, there is a list of verbs in the past tense that use être. This might seem confusing, however, there is a very easy way of remembering it, and that is simply to remember this anagram: MRS VAN DE TRAMP

M - Monter: to climb
R - Rester: to stay
S - Sortir: to exit
V - Veiir: to come
A - Arriver: to arrive
N - Nâître: to be born
D - Descendre: to go down
E - Entrer: to enter
T - Tomber: to fall
R - Rétourner: to return
A - Aller: to go
M - Mourir: to die
P - Partir: to leave

It is good to learn this anagram - write it out a few times until you know it. This should help you lock it in your mind! 

Don't forget as well that when you use a verb in the past tense that requires être, you must make sure to make the masculine/feminine and singular/plural endings agree.

For example, if you are a girl talking in the first person, you must say 'je suis allée" (I went).

Some more examples:

He was born: il est nu
She was born: elle est nue
They (m) entered: Ils ont entrés
We fell: Nous sommes tombés

Practice writing out some sentences in the past tense using the list of Mrs Van De Tramp.

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5 months ago

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