Zoë D. GCSE English Literature tutor, GCSE Portuguese tutor, A Level ...

Zoë D.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: English and Modern Languages (Portuguese) (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Anne's College University

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About me

Hi, I’m Zoë! I’m about to start my final year at university, studying English and Portuguese. 

Coming to grips with the structure of English Literature and Language exams can seem daunting at first but 1:1 tutorials are a great way to go over the material and I know that in a busy classroom, you can often be left with queries or questions. I’m really happy to structure the tutorial around whatever you need help with, be it focusing on one particular text, placing the texts in historical context, or going over your approach to exam questions. I’m an enthusiastic tutor and I’ll engage you in the tutorials: reading critically, and as literature really benefits from discussions, I’d really like to hear what you think about what you’re reading!  

Portuguese is becoming increasingly popular, and I personally think it’s a wonderful language. I grew up speaking English and Portuguese, and I’ve spent a year in Brazil, so I’m fluent and comfortable switching between the two. Thanks to the great grammar classes at university I’ve come to really understand the language and I sat both the GCSE and A Level at school, so I’m familiar with the exam format. Whether you’re studying Portuguese for the first time or, like me, you’re a native speaker who’d like help preparing for the exams, I’m here to help!

Hi, I’m Zoë! I’m about to start my final year at university, studying English and Portuguese. 

Coming to grips with the structure of English Literature and Language exams can seem daunting at first but 1:1 tutorials are a great way to go over the material and I know that in a busy classroom, you can often be left with queries or questions. I’m really happy to structure the tutorial around whatever you need help with, be it focusing on one particular text, placing the texts in historical context, or going over your approach to exam questions. I’m an enthusiastic tutor and I’ll engage you in the tutorials: reading critically, and as literature really benefits from discussions, I’d really like to hear what you think about what you’re reading!  

Portuguese is becoming increasingly popular, and I personally think it’s a wonderful language. I grew up speaking English and Portuguese, and I’ve spent a year in Brazil, so I’m fluent and comfortable switching between the two. Thanks to the great grammar classes at university I’ve come to really understand the language and I sat both the GCSE and A Level at school, so I’m familiar with the exam format. Whether you’re studying Portuguese for the first time or, like me, you’re a native speaker who’d like help preparing for the exams, I’m here to help!

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
EnglishA-level (A2)A
MathsA-level (A2)A
HistoryA-level (A2)A
PortugueseA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
English LanguageA Level£20 /hr
PortugueseA Level£20 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£18 /hr
PortugueseGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Zoë has answered

How should I go about comparing two poems for GCSE?

Most importantly, don’t rush! Take time to reread the poems with the theme of the question in mind. 

Make sure you understand everything - plan the essay first. You might find it helpful to draw out a two column table, with a column for each poem, and write down parts of the poems that address the theme of the question. It might sound obvious, but think about them as poems (look closely at, for example, verse form, structure, stanza, rhyme, sound, imagery, metaphor, vocabulary, tone). Think about what the poets are trying to convey - what is the effect of a certain metaphor or a certain rhyme scheme?

Clarity is important - your introduction should address the question, and set out how you are going to compare them. This will help you and the person reading it. In your plan, establish three central points. Each point should refer to both poems: remember that it is a comparison. Once you have established your three points, provide evidence from both poems, and then back them up.

Most importantly, don’t rush! Take time to reread the poems with the theme of the question in mind. 

Make sure you understand everything - plan the essay first. You might find it helpful to draw out a two column table, with a column for each poem, and write down parts of the poems that address the theme of the question. It might sound obvious, but think about them as poems (look closely at, for example, verse form, structure, stanza, rhyme, sound, imagery, metaphor, vocabulary, tone). Think about what the poets are trying to convey - what is the effect of a certain metaphor or a certain rhyme scheme?

Clarity is important - your introduction should address the question, and set out how you are going to compare them. This will help you and the person reading it. In your plan, establish three central points. Each point should refer to both poems: remember that it is a comparison. Once you have established your three points, provide evidence from both poems, and then back them up.

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1 year ago

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