Sian M. 11 Plus English tutor, GCSE English tutor, 13 plus  English t...
£20 - £25 /hr

Sian M.

Degree: English Language and Literature (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Hugh's College University

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About me

About Me

I have just finished my undergraduate degree in English Language and Literature at Oxford University, and am currently studying for my Masters at Cambridge University. I have always loved reading and writing essays, and hope that my tutorials will help you love them just as much! 

I have lots of experience in teaching. Not only have I been tutoring since 2012, I have also helped to teach Irish Dancing to all age groups. 

The Sessions

We will go over whatever you need help with during your sessions, whether it be critical theories and movements, content, or writing styles. I am also happy to look over your work and give feedback, to discuss ways to plan and write an essay, and to help make UCAS applications look a bit less scary!

What Next?

If you have any questions, send me a 'Webmail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor' session. Remember to tell me what you're stuck on, and what your exam board is!

 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English A Level £22 /hr
Classical Civilisation GCSE £20 /hr
English GCSE £20 /hr
History GCSE £20 /hr
Philosophy and Ethics GCSE £20 /hr
Religious Studies GCSE £20 /hr
English 13 Plus £20 /hr
History 13 Plus £20 /hr
Religious Studies 13 Plus £20 /hr
English 11 Plus £20 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £20 /hr
-Oxbridge Preparation- Mentoring £22 /hr
.ELAT Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English Language and LiteratureBachelors Degree2.i
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
Classical CivilisationA-LevelA*
Religious Philosophy and EthicsA-LevelA
General StudiesA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 16 customer reviews

Jess (Student) October 2 2016

Really lovely and helpful. Talked me through the ELAT (and in the process put my mind at rest a little)! Thank you :)

David (Parent) December 7 2016

David (Parent) November 30 2016

David (Parent) November 22 2016

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Questions Sian has answered

How should I use quotes in an essay?

Common methods of quote analysis taught for GCSE-standard essays are similar to PQA (point, quote, analysis), which can be effective - if formulaic. While this works well at lower levels, variation can be key to improving your writing style and argumentative rigour when writing for A-Level sta...

Common methods of quote analysis taught for GCSE-standard essays are similar to PQA (point, quote, analysis), which can be effective - if formulaic. While this works well at lower levels, variation can be key to improving your writing style and argumentative rigour when writing for A-Level standard and above.

PQA ought to be adopted if the quote being used drives your argument forwards, and if analysis of the quotation is key to understanding what is being said. The quotation need only be set apart from the rest of the paragraph (set a line under and a line above surrounding text, and indented) if it is substantially long - common sense should be used, but people commonly indent if the quotation would take up more than three indented lines. 

If a quote is being used to support a point or assumption (for example, summarising a character's personality or setting a scene) integration can be useful, showing your familarity with the text while continuing to move your argument forwards. For example: 'The 'serpentine' path described at the beginning of Stoker's text...', 'Although 'dressed in white', the protagonist...'.

Quotations need not be taken solely from primary texts - critical quotes can also show a high level of engagement and understanding. Critical arguments and quotes should be used to forward your argument, not merely support it. Whether you agree or disagree, your opinion should be supported with references to the primary text, and each critical quote should be employed with purpose. A particularly good approach is to compare two critics who hold conflicting stances, explaining who you support and why.

It can be difficult to know what method is the correct one to employ at any given time - I would reccomend googling some of the themes and texts you're writing on, and reading relevant essays on 'google scholar', and passages from books on 'google books'. From these, you can not only gain more insight into your texts, but also begin to pick up on different ways to employ quotations.

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4 months ago

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