Sophie Z. IB Chemistry tutor, IB Economics tutor, IB Biology tutor, I...

Sophie Z.

Unavailable

Chemistry (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

5.0
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6 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

6 completed lessons

About me

I am currently an (environmental) chemistry student at the University of Edinburgh, and I will be the first to admit I am a science geek. Now, if science is not your thing, I hope that by the end of one of my sessions you might start to appreciate it's finesse as much as I do.  I always find it difficult to describe myself, but I guess one word that would definitely describe me is determined. I am, and always have been determined to succeed- whether that takes me five minutes to achieve or five months, I will not stop. And that is a skill that I will not only apply to my tutees but will try to pass on to them as well. Giving up is never an option!  In terms of teaching style, I am definitely someone who appreciates tutees taking initiative. I can only help so much as they allow me to. I have found that such sessions are much more fruitful when the tutee knows exactly what it is that they need help with, if they want to go over questions I can do that, if they want the best results it would be good to send them to me earlier, so that I can prepare answers to them- otherwise I will go over it during the session, but again, that will take away from the time they could be using to ask other questions. Of course I will also go over concepts, and try my best to explain any concepts they are having issues with. When it comes to chemistry I find anologies incredibly helpful so that is something that I will usuually incorporate into my teaching as well, as I find it really helps to put things into perspective and allows people to look at things in a different light. I am currently an (environmental) chemistry student at the University of Edinburgh, and I will be the first to admit I am a science geek. Now, if science is not your thing, I hope that by the end of one of my sessions you might start to appreciate it's finesse as much as I do.  I always find it difficult to describe myself, but I guess one word that would definitely describe me is determined. I am, and always have been determined to succeed- whether that takes me five minutes to achieve or five months, I will not stop. And that is a skill that I will not only apply to my tutees but will try to pass on to them as well. Giving up is never an option!  In terms of teaching style, I am definitely someone who appreciates tutees taking initiative. I can only help so much as they allow me to. I have found that such sessions are much more fruitful when the tutee knows exactly what it is that they need help with, if they want to go over questions I can do that, if they want the best results it would be good to send them to me earlier, so that I can prepare answers to them- otherwise I will go over it during the session, but again, that will take away from the time they could be using to ask other questions. Of course I will also go over concepts, and try my best to explain any concepts they are having issues with. When it comes to chemistry I find anologies incredibly helpful so that is something that I will usuually incorporate into my teaching as well, as I find it really helps to put things into perspective and allows people to look at things in a different light. 

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 6 customer reviews
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Jonathon (Parent from Guernsey)

March 30 2017

Great tutorial!

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Jonathon (Parent from Guernsey)

April 4 2017

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Jonathon (Parent from Guernsey)

March 23 2017

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Jonathon (Parent from Guernsey)

March 16 2017

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
IB Math Standard LevelInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
IB English Lang & Lit A Standard LevelInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
IB Spanish B Standard LevelInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
IB Biology Higher Level International Baccalaureate (IB)7
IB Chemistry Higher Level International Baccalaureate (IB)7
IB Economics Higher LevelInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyGCSE£22 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£22 /hr
EconomicsGCSE£22 /hr
EnglishGCSE£22 /hr
MathsGCSE£22 /hr
ChemistryIB£24 /hr
MathsIB£24 /hr

Questions Sophie has answered

Cu2+ (aq) reacts with ammonia to form the complex ion [Cu(NH)3)4]2+. Explain this reaction in terms of acid-base theory, and outline the bonding in the complex formed between Cu2+ and NH3

Ammonia acts as the Lewis base in this reaction by donating its lone pair of electrons, whilst Cu2+ (which is an electron deficient, electrophile) accepts the lone pair of electrons from the ammonia, making it a Lewis acid. The bond between Cu2+ and NH3 is a coordinate bond (also known as a dative bond), whereby the electrons in the bond are both donated by one species (in this case NH3). Thus NH3 is a ligand. Cu2+ is the electrophile (electron deficient) and NH3 is the nucleophile (electron rich). 

Ammonia acts as the Lewis base in this reaction by donating its lone pair of electrons, whilst Cu2+ (which is an electron deficient, electrophile) accepts the lone pair of electrons from the ammonia, making it a Lewis acid. The bond between Cu2+ and NH3 is a coordinate bond (also known as a dative bond), whereby the electrons in the bond are both donated by one species (in this case NH3). Thus NH3 is a ligand. Cu2+ is the electrophile (electron deficient) and NH3 is the nucleophile (electron rich). 

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2 years ago

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