Ruby K. GCSE English tutor, 11 Plus English tutor, 13 plus  English t...

Ruby K.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: French and Italian (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

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| 3 completed tutorials

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About me

I'm currently in my first year studying French and Italian at the University of Edinburgh. I am really passionate about languages (I'm also studying Arabic in my spare time, and hopefully Catalan next year), French in particular. I love the way it sounds and I find the grammar fascinating - grammar can be interesting, I promise! In my spare time, I write and perform poetry at slams and open mics across the city. I also volunteer with a youth group every week. I live in Scotland now, but I grew up and was educated in England. I've struggled with exam stress majorly before, so I understand how important it is to feel prepared before you go into the exam hall. I've developed some solid techniques which helped me through GCSEs and A levels which I would love to share with you. Applying to university was also a daunting experience, but now I'm on the other side of it I can help you and make the process a little less scary and/or confusing.

I'm currently in my first year studying French and Italian at the University of Edinburgh. I am really passionate about languages (I'm also studying Arabic in my spare time, and hopefully Catalan next year), French in particular. I love the way it sounds and I find the grammar fascinating - grammar can be interesting, I promise! In my spare time, I write and perform poetry at slams and open mics across the city. I also volunteer with a youth group every week. I live in Scotland now, but I grew up and was educated in England. I've struggled with exam stress majorly before, so I understand how important it is to feel prepared before you go into the exam hall. I've developed some solid techniques which helped me through GCSEs and A levels which I would love to share with you. Applying to university was also a daunting experience, but now I'm on the other side of it I can help you and make the process a little less scary and/or confusing.

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About my sessions

My tutorials will always be as student-led as possible, as I firmly believe that you are the best position to direct your own learning. I'll always include activities where you can try out knowledge for yourself, whether that be foreign language conversation or working through an essay plan, as doing is often the best way of learning. We'll set out a solid plan for the tutorials so you know where your lessons are going and I'll always provide constructive feedback and encouragement. I'll get you to explain difficult concepts back to me in your own words so I can check understanding. When preparing for exams, we'll focus on exam technique as a framework for revision. Overall, though, how you learn will be up to you and our tutorials will always work as a conversation, not just you being lectured.

My tutorials will always be as student-led as possible, as I firmly believe that you are the best position to direct your own learning. I'll always include activities where you can try out knowledge for yourself, whether that be foreign language conversation or working through an essay plan, as doing is often the best way of learning. We'll set out a solid plan for the tutorials so you know where your lessons are going and I'll always provide constructive feedback and encouragement. I'll get you to explain difficult concepts back to me in your own words so I can check understanding. When preparing for exams, we'll focus on exam technique as a framework for revision. Overall, though, how you learn will be up to you and our tutorials will always work as a conversation, not just you being lectured.

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Enhanced DBS Check

02/03/2015

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
HistoryA-level (A2)A*
English LanguageA-level (A2)A*
FrenchA-level (A2)A*
EPQA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
FrenchA Level£20 /hr
EnglishGCSE£18 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£18 /hr
Extended Project QualificationGCSE£18 /hr
FrenchGCSE£18 /hr
HistoryGCSE£18 /hr
English13 Plus£18 /hr
French13 Plus£18 /hr
History13 Plus£18 /hr
English11 Plus£18 /hr

Questions Ruby has answered

How do I use direct and indirect object pronouns in French?

Let’s start with direct object pronouns. First of all, what is a direct object? The direct object of a sentence is the thing directly affected by the verb. Usually it follows the verb straight away. For example, in the sentence ‘Sally eats the apple’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object. It works the same in French: in ‘Sally mange la pomme’, ‘la pomme’ is the direct object. We use direct object pronouns to replace the direct object in a sentence. If you didn’t want to keep repeating yourself, instead of saying ‘Sally eats the apple’, you might want to say ‘Sally eats it’. Simple enough in English, but slightly more complex in French. Firstly, the direct object pronouns, as with everything in French, must agree with the noun they’re replacing. The direct object pronouns are me, nous, te, vous, le, la and les. As ‘la pomme’ is a feminine noun, we need to use ‘la’. The other key difference between English and French here is the word order. In French, the direct object pronoun comes before the verb. So, to say ‘Sally eats it’, you would say ‘Sally la mange’.

 

So, what’s an indirect object? An indirect object is also affected by the verb, and is the recipient of the direct object. That sounds a bit confusing, so let’s look at an example. In the sentence ‘Sally gives the apple to Jack’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object again, and ‘Jack’ is the indirect object. Usually the indirect object follows a preposition, so they’re quite easy to spot. In French, this sentence would look like this: ‘Sally donne la pomme à Jack’. So what if we wanted to say ‘Sally gives the apple to him’? We’re replacing the indirect object (‘Jack’) with a pronoun. The indirect object pronouns in French are y, en, me, nous, te, vous, lui and leur, so we would use ‘lui’ for ‘Jack’. The word order is the same as with direct objects, so we would end up with ‘Sally lui donne la pomme’.

 

Last but not least, let’s look at what happens if we have direct and indirect object pronouns in the same sentence. As noted, there are two objects in the sentence ‘Sally gives the apple to Jack’. What if we wanted to say ‘Sally gives it to him’? We’ve already learned that ‘the apple’ is replaced by ‘la’ and ‘Jack’ is replaced by ‘lui’. There is a specific order for pronouns in French: me, te, se, nous, vous → le, la, les → lui, leur → y → en. Therefore the sentence would end up reading: ‘Sally la lui donne’.


There’s lots more to explore with direct and indirect object pronouns, but this is the basics covered.

Let’s start with direct object pronouns. First of all, what is a direct object? The direct object of a sentence is the thing directly affected by the verb. Usually it follows the verb straight away. For example, in the sentence ‘Sally eats the apple’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object. It works the same in French: in ‘Sally mange la pomme’, ‘la pomme’ is the direct object. We use direct object pronouns to replace the direct object in a sentence. If you didn’t want to keep repeating yourself, instead of saying ‘Sally eats the apple’, you might want to say ‘Sally eats it’. Simple enough in English, but slightly more complex in French. Firstly, the direct object pronouns, as with everything in French, must agree with the noun they’re replacing. The direct object pronouns are me, nous, te, vous, le, la and les. As ‘la pomme’ is a feminine noun, we need to use ‘la’. The other key difference between English and French here is the word order. In French, the direct object pronoun comes before the verb. So, to say ‘Sally eats it’, you would say ‘Sally la mange’.

 

So, what’s an indirect object? An indirect object is also affected by the verb, and is the recipient of the direct object. That sounds a bit confusing, so let’s look at an example. In the sentence ‘Sally gives the apple to Jack’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object again, and ‘Jack’ is the indirect object. Usually the indirect object follows a preposition, so they’re quite easy to spot. In French, this sentence would look like this: ‘Sally donne la pomme à Jack’. So what if we wanted to say ‘Sally gives the apple to him’? We’re replacing the indirect object (‘Jack’) with a pronoun. The indirect object pronouns in French are y, en, me, nous, te, vous, lui and leur, so we would use ‘lui’ for ‘Jack’. The word order is the same as with direct objects, so we would end up with ‘Sally lui donne la pomme’.

 

Last but not least, let’s look at what happens if we have direct and indirect object pronouns in the same sentence. As noted, there are two objects in the sentence ‘Sally gives the apple to Jack’. What if we wanted to say ‘Sally gives it to him’? We’ve already learned that ‘the apple’ is replaced by ‘la’ and ‘Jack’ is replaced by ‘lui’. There is a specific order for pronouns in French: me, te, se, nous, vous → le, la, les → lui, leur → y → en. Therefore the sentence would end up reading: ‘Sally la lui donne’.


There’s lots more to explore with direct and indirect object pronouns, but this is the basics covered.

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1 year ago

628 views

How do I write a really good History essay?

It can seem pretty daunting when you sit down to write a History essay, but these tips will hopefully make it a lot easier.

 

Planning

Make sure you plan your essays before you write them. In timed conditions, spend around 5 minutes at the start structuring your answer - it’ll pay off, I promise! Make sure you include an introduction, around 3 main paragraphs, then a conclusion. Consider the different factors that come into play, and explore each of them in a separate paragraph. Make sure you get time for a conclusion - this is where you summarise your argument and make a judgement on the question, so it’s really vital.

 

Linking factors

You get marks for prioritisation and making links between factors, so you should definitely include some in your essays. Evaluate factors against each other and make comparisons. Some phrases you could try to include are: ‘this was the most important factor because…’ ‘this was more important in the long-term’, ‘this factor triggered another factor…’.

 

Details

As you go along through your course, try and learn some specific statistics and details. It looks really impressive when you can put them in your essays, and it helps you to support your arguments. Make sure you learn specialist vocabulary and tricky names: you’ve got to spell them right!

 

Focus on the question

I can’t emphasise how important this tip is. Always stay focused on the question to make sure you’re answering it properly. Use the exact wording of the question throughout your essay, even if you think it sounds like you’re repeating yourself. At the end of each paragraph, link back to the question/title to make sure what you’ve been saying is relevant.

 

It can seem pretty daunting when you sit down to write a History essay, but these tips will hopefully make it a lot easier.

 

Planning

Make sure you plan your essays before you write them. In timed conditions, spend around 5 minutes at the start structuring your answer - it’ll pay off, I promise! Make sure you include an introduction, around 3 main paragraphs, then a conclusion. Consider the different factors that come into play, and explore each of them in a separate paragraph. Make sure you get time for a conclusion - this is where you summarise your argument and make a judgement on the question, so it’s really vital.

 

Linking factors

You get marks for prioritisation and making links between factors, so you should definitely include some in your essays. Evaluate factors against each other and make comparisons. Some phrases you could try to include are: ‘this was the most important factor because…’ ‘this was more important in the long-term’, ‘this factor triggered another factor…’.

 

Details

As you go along through your course, try and learn some specific statistics and details. It looks really impressive when you can put them in your essays, and it helps you to support your arguments. Make sure you learn specialist vocabulary and tricky names: you’ve got to spell them right!

 

Focus on the question

I can’t emphasise how important this tip is. Always stay focused on the question to make sure you’re answering it properly. Use the exact wording of the question throughout your essay, even if you think it sounds like you’re repeating yourself. At the end of each paragraph, link back to the question/title to make sure what you’ve been saying is relevant.

 

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1 year ago

551 views

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