Ruby K. GCSE English tutor, 11 Plus English tutor, 13 plus  English t...

Ruby K.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: French and Italian (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

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About me

About me:

I’m currently in my first year studying French and Italian at the University of Edinburgh. I live in Scotland now, but I went to school and college in England. I love learning and hope to share my passion for academia with you. As a youth leader, I spend a lot of time working with children and young people. In my spare time, I write and perform poetry: as well as being an enthusiastic and confident speaker, I have experience running creative writing workshops for groups of all ages.

The sessions:

My approach is friendly and patient, and my sessions will always be as student-led as possible. I have experience working with people of all different needs and abilities and will tailor the tutoring to whatever suits you best, and we’ll start with your questions and what you feel you’re struggling with the most. I can help you work through grammar exercises, tackle past exam questions, proof read essays, make mind maps linking ideas… I’ll always make sure you’ve understood everything before we move on by asking you to explain it back to me.

Get in touch:

If you’re interested in a session, contact me via this site. Please let me know the subject and level that you require, along with any specific needs or information and potential times for the Meet The Tutor session.

I can't wait to meet you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £20 /hr
English GCSE £18 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
Extended Project Qualification GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
English 13 Plus £18 /hr
French 13 Plus £18 /hr
History 13 Plus £18 /hr
English 11 Plus £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
HistoryA-LevelA*
English LanguageA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelA*
EPQA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

02/03/2015

Currently unavailable: for regular students

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Ruby has answered

How do I use direct and indirect object pronouns in French?

Let’s start with direct object pronouns. First of all, what is a direct object? The direct object of a sentence is the thingdirectly affected by the verb. Usually it follows the verb straight away. For example, in the sentence ‘Sally eats the apple’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object. It works ...

Let’s start with direct object pronouns. First of all, what is a direct object? The direct object of a sentence is the thing directly affected by the verb. Usually it follows the verb straight away. For example, in the sentence ‘Sally eats the apple’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object. It works the same in French: in ‘Sally mange la pomme’, ‘la pomme’ is the direct object. We use direct object pronouns to replace the direct object in a sentence. If you didn’t want to keep repeating yourself, instead of saying ‘Sally eats the apple’, you might want to say ‘Sally eats it’. Simple enough in English, but slightly more complex in French. Firstly, the direct object pronouns, as with everything in French, must agree with the noun they’re replacing. The direct object pronouns are me, nous, te, vous, le, la and les. As ‘la pomme’ is a feminine noun, we need to use ‘la’. The other key difference between English and French here is the word order. In French, the direct object pronoun comes before the verb. So, to say ‘Sally eats it’, you would say ‘Sally la mange’.

 

So, what’s an indirect object? An indirect object is also affected by the verb, and is the recipient of the direct object. That sounds a bit confusing, so let’s look at an example. In the sentence ‘Sally gives the apple to Jack’, ‘the apple’ is the direct object again, and ‘Jack’ is the indirect object. Usually the indirect object follows a preposition, so they’re quite easy to spot. In French, this sentence would look like this: ‘Sally donne la pomme à Jack’. So what if we wanted to say ‘Sally gives the apple to him’? We’re replacing the indirect object (‘Jack’) with a pronoun. The indirect object pronouns in French are y, en, me, nous, te, vous, lui and leur, so we would use ‘lui’ for ‘Jack’. The word order is the same as with direct objects, so we would end up with ‘Sally lui donne la pomme’.

 

Last but not least, let’s look at what happens if we have direct and indirect object pronouns in the same sentence. As noted, there are two objects in the sentence ‘Sally gives the apple to Jack’. What if we wanted to say ‘Sally gives it to him’? We’ve already learned that ‘the apple’ is replaced by ‘la’ and ‘Jack’ is replaced by ‘lui’. There is a specific order for pronouns in French: me, te, se, nous, vous → le, la, les → lui, leur → y → en. Therefore the sentence would end up reading: ‘Sally la lui donne’.


There’s lots more to explore with direct and indirect object pronouns, but this is the basics covered.

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3 months ago

111 views

How do I write a really good History essay?

It can seem pretty daunting when you sit down to write a History essay, but these tips will hopefully make it a lot easier.   Planning Make sure you plan your essays before you write them. In timed conditions, spend around 5 minutes at the start structuring your answer - it’ll pay off,...

It can seem pretty daunting when you sit down to write a History essay, but these tips will hopefully make it a lot easier.

 

Planning

Make sure you plan your essays before you write them. In timed conditions, spend around 5 minutes at the start structuring your answer - it’ll pay off, I promise! Make sure you include an introduction, around 3 main paragraphs, then a conclusion. Consider the different factors that come into play, and explore each of them in a separate paragraph. Make sure you get time for a conclusion - this is where you summarise your argument and make a judgement on the question, so it’s really vital.

 

Linking factors

You get marks for prioritisation and making links between factors, so you should definitely include some in your essays. Evaluate factors against each other and make comparisons. Some phrases you could try to include are: ‘this was the most important factor because…’ ‘this was more important in the long-term’, ‘this factor triggered another factor…’.

 

Details

As you go along through your course, try and learn some specific statistics and details. It looks really impressive when you can put them in your essays, and it helps you to support your arguments. Make sure you learn specialist vocabulary and tricky names: you’ve got to spell them right!

 

Focus on the question

I can’t emphasise how important this tip is. Always stay focused on the question to make sure you’re answering it properly. Use the exact wording of the question throughout your essay, even if you think it sounds like you’re repeating yourself. At the end of each paragraph, link back to the question/title to make sure what you’ve been saying is relevant.

 

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3 months ago

113 views
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