Miles L. A Level Philosophy tutor, A Level Religious Studies tutor, M...

Miles L.

£20 - £25 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Philosophy & Theology (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Benet's Hall University

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1 review| 9 completed tutorials

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About me

Hi, I'm Miles. I've just graduated from the University of Oxford, where I took a BA in Philosophy and Theology. I'm a confident and patient tutor, with plenty of experience teaching in both one-on-one and classroom environments. I can teach a variety of subjects, including Maths, Further Maths and English up to A Level standard, as well as helping with Oxbridge preparation. In my tutorials I take a constructive approach, aiming to boost the confidence of my pupils by helping them work things out for themselves, not just telling them the answers. I'm aware that all students learn differently - for example, I've helped my younger brother and sister over the years with their work, and we're all either dyslexic or dyspraxic. Please get in touch if you have any questions - I look forward to hearing from you.

Hi, I'm Miles. I've just graduated from the University of Oxford, where I took a BA in Philosophy and Theology. I'm a confident and patient tutor, with plenty of experience teaching in both one-on-one and classroom environments. I can teach a variety of subjects, including Maths, Further Maths and English up to A Level standard, as well as helping with Oxbridge preparation. In my tutorials I take a constructive approach, aiming to boost the confidence of my pupils by helping them work things out for themselves, not just telling them the answers. I'm aware that all students learn differently - for example, I've helped my younger brother and sister over the years with their work, and we're all either dyslexic or dyspraxic. Please get in touch if you have any questions - I look forward to hearing from you.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 1 customer review
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Alia (Parent)

June 24 2016

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsA-level (A2)A
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)A
English Language & LiteratureA-level (A2)A
Music TechnologyA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Further MathematicsA Level£22 /hr
MathsA Level£22 /hr
PhilosophyA Level£22 /hr
Philosophy and EthicsA Level£22 /hr
Religious StudiesA Level£22 /hr
EnglishGCSE£20 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£20 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£20 /hr
MathsGCSE£20 /hr
MusicGCSE£20 /hr
PhilosophyGCSE£20 /hr
Religious StudiesGCSE£20 /hr
English13 Plus£20 /hr
Maths13 Plus£20 /hr
-Oxbridge Preparation-Mentoring£22 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Miles has answered

What's the difference between dramatic and proleptic irony?

Both of these are literary devices used in playwriting. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something relevant to the plot that the characters are not aware of. For example, in a play about the assassination of JFK, the audience would be expected to know that the president is going to be killed, and how it happened. The characters in the play, however, are not aware of this. Proleptic irony, on the other hand, occurs when an earlier event gives the audience a clue ("foreshadows") a later event in the play. To use the scenario of JFK's assassination again, perhaps a security advisor might say to the president earlier in the play that it would be worthwhile increasing the security detail when the president is in public, as there is an increased threat of assassination. This would foreshadow the actual assassination of JFK – it gives the audience a clue that perhaps JFK is not being cautious enough, and that there is a chance he will be killed.

Both of these are literary devices used in playwriting. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something relevant to the plot that the characters are not aware of. For example, in a play about the assassination of JFK, the audience would be expected to know that the president is going to be killed, and how it happened. The characters in the play, however, are not aware of this. Proleptic irony, on the other hand, occurs when an earlier event gives the audience a clue ("foreshadows") a later event in the play. To use the scenario of JFK's assassination again, perhaps a security advisor might say to the president earlier in the play that it would be worthwhile increasing the security detail when the president is in public, as there is an increased threat of assassination. This would foreshadow the actual assassination of JFK – it gives the audience a clue that perhaps JFK is not being cautious enough, and that there is a chance he will be killed.

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2 years ago

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