Atalie S. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor

Atalie S.

Currently unavailable: until 03/11/2017

Degree: Biology (Bachelors) - York University

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About me

I am a biological sciences student at The University of York, my enthusiasm for biology stretches across all sub-topics and I work hard to expand my knowledge. I am friendly and approachable, I want to work with you to help you reach your goals and am more than willing to put in the extra time and effort to show you all the things you can accomplish.

First, we will identify the areas which you are struggling with and you would like me to help with, then with animations, diagrams, explanations and past paper questions I will help you to feel confident and capable. I aim to create an interactive environment where you feel safe to explore a subject. I can also help advise revision strategies, how to write an excellent personal statement for university, and help you find out which way you learn best.

I enjoy archery, reading, and volunteering. I have volunteered for an elderly care home and for the British Heart Foundation, so I have learnt many ways to express myself to a wide variety of people. I also have experience tutoring friends though GCSE, AS levels and A levels, so I am experienced in helping people learn.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
BiologyA-LevelA*
PsychologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

11/11/2014

Currently unavailable: until

03/11/2017

Questions Atalie has answered

How do diffusion and osmosis work?

Imagine someone sprays a deodorant from across the room, eventually it will make its way over to where you are and you can smell it. Diffusion is the spreading out of particles resulting in a net movement from an area of high concentration (where the person sprayed the deodorant), to an area o...

Imagine someone sprays a deodorant from across the room, eventually it will make its way over to where you are and you can smell it. Diffusion is the spreading out of particles resulting in a net movement from an area of high concentration (where the person sprayed the deodorant), to an area of low concentration (where you are, on the other side of the room). The particles move randomly down a concentration gradient, they are not adventurers on a mission, but tiny particles bumping into each other and eventually reaching dynamic equilibrium where the particles are near-evenly spread out across the room. Some of the substances transported in or out of cells via diffusion are carbon dioxide and oxygen in gaseous exchange, and urea from cells into the blood plasma for excretion in the kidney.

Osmosis is very similar but this is the movement of water molecules. It is defined as: the diffusion of water from a dilute solution to a concentrated solution through a semi-permeable membrane. In the dilute solution there is a high concentration of water, and in the concentrated solution there is a low concentration of water. An example of this is when there is a concentrated solution outside of animal cells, the water moves out of the cell by osmosis down a water potential gradient (basically a water concentration gradient, but measured in water potential) out of the cell, causing the cell to shrivel up and die.

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3 months ago

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How is RNA different to DNA?

There are a few key points you should remember. RNA has a ribose sugar instead of a deoxyribose sugar, RNA also has uracil instead of thymine, so uracil binds to adenine. The base pairings in RNA are G-C, A-U. In addition, RNA is usually single stranded, whilst DNA is double stranded and wound...

There are a few key points you should remember. RNA has a ribose sugar instead of a deoxyribose sugar, RNA also has uracil instead of thymine, so uracil binds to adenine. The base pairings in RNA are G-C, A-U. In addition, RNA is usually single stranded, whilst DNA is double stranded and wound in a double helix.

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3 months ago

118 views

What do I do with the Hardy-Weinberg equation?

p2+ 2pq + q2= 1    It looks daunting at first but once you get the hang of them they can be easy marks in the exam. p is the frequency of the dominant allele in the population, and q is the frequency of the recessive allele in the population. p2 is two dominant alleles and so represents...

p2+ 2pq q2= 1 

 

It looks daunting at first but once you get the hang of them they can be easy marks in the exam. p is the frequency of the dominant allele in the population, and q is the frequency of the recessive allele in the population. p2 is two dominant alleles and so represents the frequency of the homozygous dominant genotype (pp), and q2 is two recessive alleles and represents the frequency of the homozygous recessive genotype (qq). 2pq represents the frequency of the heterozygous genotype (pq). By substituting different numbers into the frequencies you can work out the frequency of a genotype in a population, there are of course limits to the accuracy of this, but it is still a very useful equation. You do not need to know how the equation came to look how it does but in case you are interested or it helps you learn I have outlined it below:

For a population in genetic equilibrium:

p+q=1 (the sum of both allele frequencies is 100%)

(p + q)2 =1

So

p2 + 2pq q2 = 1 

In a tutoring session I would walk you through multiple examples and give you past paper equations to try, I have a few tips and tricks about this topic which helped me during my exams.

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3 months ago

114 views
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