Thomas W. GCSE Chemistry tutor, A Level Chemistry tutor, GCSE Biology...

Thomas W.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: MSci Chemistry (Masters) - Nottingham University

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About me

ABOUT ME I am an MSci Chemistry student at the University of Nottingham. I have always loved science throughout school and I hope that I can help you enjoy and understand it too. At A-Level I studied Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Psychology which has given me both a broad and in-depth understanding of science which hopefully I can use to help you with your studies. Outside of University, I am an amateur Ballroom and Latin dancer and I compete on the University of Nottingham Dancesport team. During this, I have spent time teaching complete beginners to dance. Throughout my own studies, I have found many difficulties (including mathematics) and I hope that the different revision and learning skills I have learnt will help you develop your knowledge further.ABOUT ME I am an MSci Chemistry student at the University of Nottingham. I have always loved science throughout school and I hope that I can help you enjoy and understand it too. At A-Level I studied Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Psychology which has given me both a broad and in-depth understanding of science which hopefully I can use to help you with your studies. Outside of University, I am an amateur Ballroom and Latin dancer and I compete on the University of Nottingham Dancesport team. During this, I have spent time teaching complete beginners to dance. Throughout my own studies, I have found many difficulties (including mathematics) and I hope that the different revision and learning skills I have learnt will help you develop your knowledge further.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
ChemistryA-level (A2)B
BiologyA-level (A2)A
PhysicsA-level (A2)B
Extended Project QualificationA-level (A2)A
General StudiesA-level (A2)B
PsychologyA-level (A2)B

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
ScienceGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Thomas has answered

How can crude oil be used as a source of hydrocarbons?

Crude oil is a natural mixture of many different hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons can be separated using a process known as fractional distillation.

The crude oil is heated in a fractioning column allowing the different hydrocarbons to evaporate. The column also has several different condensers at different heights which allow the hydrocarbons to be separated depending on their volatility (how easy it is for them to evaporate) and their density.

Hydrocarbons with the lowest density and smallest molecular size (e.g. propane) condense at the top of the column where it is the coolest. Conversely, the hydrocarbons with the highest density and largest molecular size (e.g. bitumen) condense at the bottom of the column where the temperature is the highest. Not all hydrocarbons will evaporate and condense it is common to have a collection of gases at the top of the column, liquids in the middle of the column and solids at the bottom of the column,

Once the hydrocarbons have been separated they can be used for different purposes. Below are common hydrocarbons that can be obtained through fractional distillation ordered from lowest density to the highest density:

Refinery gases (e.g. propane) – Used as bottled gases for portable stoves and barbeques

Petrol – Used as fuel in cars

Naphtha – Used in many chemical processes

Kerosene – Used as fuel in aircrafts

Diesel – Used as fuel in cars, lorries and busses

Oils – Used as fuel for ships and power stations

Bitumen – Used as a covering for roofs and pavements

Crude oil is a natural mixture of many different hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons can be separated using a process known as fractional distillation.

The crude oil is heated in a fractioning column allowing the different hydrocarbons to evaporate. The column also has several different condensers at different heights which allow the hydrocarbons to be separated depending on their volatility (how easy it is for them to evaporate) and their density.

Hydrocarbons with the lowest density and smallest molecular size (e.g. propane) condense at the top of the column where it is the coolest. Conversely, the hydrocarbons with the highest density and largest molecular size (e.g. bitumen) condense at the bottom of the column where the temperature is the highest. Not all hydrocarbons will evaporate and condense it is common to have a collection of gases at the top of the column, liquids in the middle of the column and solids at the bottom of the column,

Once the hydrocarbons have been separated they can be used for different purposes. Below are common hydrocarbons that can be obtained through fractional distillation ordered from lowest density to the highest density:

Refinery gases (e.g. propane) – Used as bottled gases for portable stoves and barbeques

Petrol – Used as fuel in cars

Naphtha – Used in many chemical processes

Kerosene – Used as fuel in aircrafts

Diesel – Used as fuel in cars, lorries and busses

Oils – Used as fuel for ships and power stations

Bitumen – Used as a covering for roofs and pavements

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1 year ago

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