Elizabeth B. IB Economics tutor, IB English Literature tutor, GCSE En...

Elizabeth B.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Policy, Politics & Economics (Bachelors) - Birmingham University

MyTutor guarantee

Contact Elizabeth

About me

Hi! I'm a Policy, Politics and Economics student at the University of Birmingham. Prior to that I studied IB which I think has definitely helped with my personal development and made me into a bit of an "all-rounder". Seeing as my course is quite tailored to undergraduate study, I will incorporate elements of it into economics and maths tutoring sessions.

Aside from my degree, I  come from a musical background having studied classical piano since the age of 4. I also received a junior scholarship to Trinity Laban Conservatoire and have studied music theory in depth. That, coupled with my experience teaching Grade 5 music theory, ensure that you are in capable hands!

Hi! I'm a Policy, Politics and Economics student at the University of Birmingham. Prior to that I studied IB which I think has definitely helped with my personal development and made me into a bit of an "all-rounder". Seeing as my course is quite tailored to undergraduate study, I will incorporate elements of it into economics and maths tutoring sessions.

Aside from my degree, I  come from a musical background having studied classical piano since the age of 4. I also received a junior scholarship to Trinity Laban Conservatoire and have studied music theory in depth. That, coupled with my experience teaching Grade 5 music theory, ensure that you are in capable hands!

Show more

No DBS Icon

No DBS Check

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
HL EconomicsInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
HL English LiteratureInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
HL PhilosophyInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EnglishGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
MusicGCSE£18 /hr
EconomicsIB£20 /hr
English LiteratureIB£20 /hr

Questions Elizabeth has answered

What are externalities?

Definition: An externality is an unintended side effect that result from production or consumption of a good, affecting the third parties.

When the market experiences externalities, it fails to reach social optimum levels where Marginal Social Benefit is equal to Marginal Social Cost.

MSB = MSC

MSB is the extra benefit to society following the consumption or production of one extra unit of a good. MSC is the extra cost to society following the consumption or production of one extra unit of a good.

Externalities can be positive or negative and relate to production or consumption. A negative externality has a negative effect on society and produces a welfare loss. A positive externality is one which has an unintended positive effect on society and produces a potential welfare gain.

Examples of externalities:

Negative externality of consumption - Where Marginal Private Cost (MPC) is above the Marginal Social Cost (MSC). There is a welfare loss between MSC and MPC.

An example of this is cigarettes.

Negative externality of production - Where Marginal Private Cost (MPC) is above the Marginal Social Cost (MSC). There is a welfare loss between MSC and MPC.

An example of this is education.

Positive externality of production - Where Marginal Social Benefit (MSB) exceeds the Marginal Private Benefit (MPB). There is a potential welfare gain between MSB and MPB.

An example of this is the use of wind farms to generate electricity.

Negative externalities are a result of overconsumption or overproduction, while positive externalities are a result of underconsumption or underproduction. Governments may intervene to correct both of these.

Definition: An externality is an unintended side effect that result from production or consumption of a good, affecting the third parties.

When the market experiences externalities, it fails to reach social optimum levels where Marginal Social Benefit is equal to Marginal Social Cost.

MSB = MSC

MSB is the extra benefit to society following the consumption or production of one extra unit of a good. MSC is the extra cost to society following the consumption or production of one extra unit of a good.

Externalities can be positive or negative and relate to production or consumption. A negative externality has a negative effect on society and produces a welfare loss. A positive externality is one which has an unintended positive effect on society and produces a potential welfare gain.

Examples of externalities:

Negative externality of consumption - Where Marginal Private Cost (MPC) is above the Marginal Social Cost (MSC). There is a welfare loss between MSC and MPC.

An example of this is cigarettes.

Negative externality of production - Where Marginal Private Cost (MPC) is above the Marginal Social Cost (MSC). There is a welfare loss between MSC and MPC.

An example of this is education.

Positive externality of production - Where Marginal Social Benefit (MSB) exceeds the Marginal Private Benefit (MPB). There is a potential welfare gain between MSB and MPB.

An example of this is the use of wind farms to generate electricity.

Negative externalities are a result of overconsumption or overproduction, while positive externalities are a result of underconsumption or underproduction. Governments may intervene to correct both of these.

Show more

1 year ago

919 views

What is sonata form?

For the purpose of this explanation, we are looking at the Classical Sonata (where the Classical period is roughly between 1750 and 1810). Sonata form is the first movement of a sonata. This is split into three sections: exposition, development and recapitulation.

The exposition introduces the main "ideas" of the piece of music. This is made up of a first and second subject. The format is as follows:

First subject in tonic key --> Bridge passage ---> Second subject in dominant or relative minor

As you can tell from the name, the development takes the exposition and expands on the main ideas. This is done through several modulations.

Finally, the recapitulation provides a shortened summary of the first and second subjects in the tonic key.

For the purpose of this explanation, we are looking at the Classical Sonata (where the Classical period is roughly between 1750 and 1810). Sonata form is the first movement of a sonata. This is split into three sections: exposition, development and recapitulation.

The exposition introduces the main "ideas" of the piece of music. This is made up of a first and second subject. The format is as follows:

First subject in tonic key --> Bridge passage ---> Second subject in dominant or relative minor

As you can tell from the name, the development takes the exposition and expands on the main ideas. This is done through several modulations.

Finally, the recapitulation provides a shortened summary of the first and second subjects in the tonic key.

Show more

1 year ago

570 views

Arrange a free video meeting


To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Elizabeth

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok