Thomas C. GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry t...

Thomas C.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Dentistry (Bachelors) - Cardiff University

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About me

About me

Hey! It’s nice to meet you! My name is Tom, I’m 21 and I’m a 4th year Dental student at Cardiff. I love all things Science and I love telling other people all about Science so tutoring suits me down to the ground! I’m very patient and willing to go the extra mile to help you!

Teaching

During my A-Levels I had a tutor – I found it really helpful just having someone there to go through things I found difficult or I needed a bit more time on! My teaching is centred around you and taught in the way that you learn best – be that visually with lots of pictures, going through questions together or starting a topic from scratch! If you’re not sure how you learn best yet, don’t panic! We’ll work it out together.

Dental School

Looking at applying for Dental School and need help with your personal statement? Look no further, I am your man! I’ve helped students with this in the past and having been a Dental student for the past 3 years so I know exactly what the admissions team are looking for.

Getting in touch

If you’ve read this far and I sound like the tutor for you then why not send me a ‘WebMail’ or book a ‘Meet the Tutor Session’ on the website. We can have a chat, discuss what you’re looking for and go from there!

I look forward to hearing from you and helping you on your journey to success!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA
MathsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

07/11/2015

Currently unavailable: for new students

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Ratings and reviews

4.8from 4 customer reviews

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Questions Thomas has answered

How do white blood cells protect us from infection?

Sometimes microorganisms are able to make it past the body's external defences (i.e. the skin) the body's immune system must defend the body. White blood cells are really important in the immune response. They circulate in the blood along with red blood cells and other components. There are d...

Sometimes microorganisms are able to make it past the body's external defences (i.e. the skin) the body's immune system must defend the body.

White blood cells are really important in the immune response. They circulate in the blood along with red blood cells and other components.

There are different types of white blood cells - some are able to engulf and digest microorganisms so that they are completely destroyed. This kills microorganisms very quickly and happens they first invade the immune system.

Other white blood cells are able to generate and release special chemicals called antibodies. These are attracted to special markers on the surface of microorganisms called ANTIGENS. Each white blood cell is specific to only one type of antigen. Antibodies are released, they attach to their specific antigen on the surface of microorganisms - microorganisms can then be bunched up into clumps, making it easier for white blood cells to engulf and digest them.

Antibodies take time to generate but once they are, the body is able to recognise specific microorganisms and can react quickly to release antibodies in future attacks - this is called natural immunity.

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3 months ago

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What are the events in the cardiac cycle?

The cardiac cycle is the series of events that leads to blood being pumped to the lungs and around the body. The cycle begins with the SAN (sino-atrial node). This is the hearts 'pacemaker'. It sends out a nerve impulse which spreads over the atria and causes them to contract (atria systole),...

The cardiac cycle is the series of events that leads to blood being pumped to the lungs and around the body.

The cycle begins with the SAN (sino-atrial node). This is the hearts 'pacemaker'. It sends out a nerve impulse which spreads over the atria and causes them to contract (atria systole), forcing blood into the ventricals. The signal is not able to spread to the ventricals as a layer of non-connective tissue blocks the signal at the base of the atria.

The signal from the SAN is recieved at the AVN (atrio-ventricular node) at the top of the ventricals. This node sends a signal down the perkyne (or purkinje) fibres which travel in the insulating Bundle of His through the inter-ventrica septum to the base of the ventricles.

At the base of the ventricals (apex) a wave of contraction passes up the ventricals causing them to contract pushing blood up and out of the ventricals.

These events can be tracked on an ECG trace.

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3 months ago

92 views

What is the difference between oxidation and reduction?

In chemistry if a substance is oxidised it loses electrons in a reaction. If a substance is reduced it gains electrons in a reaction. A reaction that has both oxidation and reduction within it is called a REDOX reaction. We can write REDOX reactions as half equations - this can make it easier...

In chemistry if a substance is oxidised it loses electrons in a reaction.

If a substance is reduced it gains electrons in a reaction.

A reaction that has both oxidation and reduction within it is called a REDOX reaction. We can write REDOX reactions as half equations - this can make it easier to see what is going on in the reaction.

For example, Zinc oxide can be reacted with Carbon to extract Zinc:

2ZnO + C --> 2Zn + CO2

In this reaction one of the substances is oxidised and one is reduced. If we write them as half equations:

Zn+ + e- --> Zn

C --> C2+ + 2e-

These equations show that Zn has GAINED an electron to have a neutral charge - there for it has been REDUCED.

Carbon has LOST 2 electrons to become C2+ - therefore it has been OXIDISED.

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3 months ago

122 views
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