Yasmin A. A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Chemistr...

Yasmin A.

£22 - £24 /hr

Studying: Medicine (Other) - University College London University

4.8
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39 reviews| 190 completed tutorials

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About me

Hello! I am a medical student at University College London.  All students have an individual learning style - this is why my teaching is tailored to you. With experience of tutoring students aged 6-19, I am confident in adapting my style as needed in order to guide you to success. I am patient, thorough and logical with my approach. I also believe it is important to make the subject we study together enjoyable. During the initial meeting, I plan to discuss your goals for our sessions so we can set targets that you are happy with. It is also an oppportunity for me to discover how you like to learn, in order to make our sessions as engaging as possible!  My experience: (2015-present) Mentor for a scheme called Target Medicine. This involves guiding students during their medical school application process, and providing structured support with their personal statements/interviews.  (2015-present) I teach lessons on first aid and emergency response to primary school children across London.  (2016-present) Mentor for 1st year medical students, where I deliver tutorials on physiology.   (2016-present) UCL e-mentor, which involves tutoring Year 12 and 13 students with their Biology/Chemistry A Levels. 

Hello! I am a medical student at University College London.  All students have an individual learning style - this is why my teaching is tailored to you. With experience of tutoring students aged 6-19, I am confident in adapting my style as needed in order to guide you to success. I am patient, thorough and logical with my approach. I also believe it is important to make the subject we study together enjoyable. During the initial meeting, I plan to discuss your goals for our sessions so we can set targets that you are happy with. It is also an oppportunity for me to discover how you like to learn, in order to make our sessions as engaging as possible!  My experience: (2015-present) Mentor for a scheme called Target Medicine. This involves guiding students during their medical school application process, and providing structured support with their personal statements/interviews.  (2015-present) I teach lessons on first aid and emergency response to primary school children across London.  (2016-present) Mentor for 1st year medical students, where I deliver tutorials on physiology.   (2016-present) UCL e-mentor, which involves tutoring Year 12 and 13 students with their Biology/Chemistry A Levels. 

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27/08/2014

Ratings & Reviews

4.8from 39 customer reviews
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JING (Parent)

November 7 2017

very helpful tutor

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Fehmida (Parent)

Really helped me understand and get my head around the subject and helped me achieve the grade I got in a short space of time.

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Tejiri (Student)

May 30 2017

really understood it

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Lalith (Parent)

January 19 2017

Thank for the lesson Yasmin! you cleared up a lot of stuff for me

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
Biology A-level (A2)A*
Chemistry A-level (A2)A
Physics A-level (A2)A
Mathematics A-level (A2)A
Medical Sciences with PsychologyDegree (Bachelors)1ST CLASS HONOURS

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£24 /hr
ChemistryA Level£24 /hr
BiologyGCSE£22 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£22 /hr
Human BiologyGCSE£22 /hr
MathsGCSE£22 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£22 /hr
ScienceGCSE£22 /hr
Maths13 Plus£22 /hr
Science13 Plus£22 /hr
Maths11 Plus£22 /hr
-Medical School Preparation-Mentoring£24 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£24 /hr

Questions Yasmin has answered

A car accelerates in 12s from 10m/s to 50m/s. Calculate its acceleration.

Firstly, write down the information you know. 

S (displacement) - unknown 

U (inital speed) - 10m/s

V (final speed) - 50m/s

A (acceleration) - we want to find this out

T (time) - 12s

The equation that links acceleration and the other knowns in this scenario is:

v = u + at 

Rearrange to form:

a = (v - u) / t

Now you can substitute in the values. 

a = (50 - 10) / 12

a = 40/12 

a = 3.333 

Therefore the car's acceleration is 3.33m/s2 (make sure you remember the correct units!). 

Firstly, write down the information you know. 

S (displacement) - unknown 

U (inital speed) - 10m/s

V (final speed) - 50m/s

A (acceleration) - we want to find this out

T (time) - 12s

The equation that links acceleration and the other knowns in this scenario is:

v = u + at 

Rearrange to form:

a = (v - u) / t

Now you can substitute in the values. 

a = (50 - 10) / 12

a = 40/12 

a = 3.333 

Therefore the car's acceleration is 3.33m/s2 (make sure you remember the correct units!). 

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1 year ago

556 views

What are enzyme inhibitors?

Enzyme inhibitors function to slow down the rate of an enzyme catalysed reaction by interfering with the enzyme in some form. There are two main types of inhibitors: 

1. Irreversible inhibitors - these molecules bind permanently to the enzyme. This means the enzyme is changed, and so its active site can no longer bind to its substrate molecule. Therefore, irreversible inhibitors effectively reduce the number of functioning enzymes available, which slows the rate of reaction. An example of an irreversible inhibitor is a metabolic poison called potassium cyanide - this works by irreversibly inhibiting the enzyme cytochrome oxidase, which is found in the electron transport chain (an essential part of respiration in our cells). If there is a reduced number of functioning cytochrome oxidase enzymes, ATP production is limited and this can have fatal consequences. 

2. Reversible inhibitors - these molecules bind temporarily to the enzyme, thus the inhibition is reversible. Competitive reversible inhibitors can be competitive, uncompetitive and non-competitive.

Competitive reversible enzyme inhibitors work by 'competing' with the substrate for the active site on the enzyme, as they have a similar shape to the substrate molecule. Despite fitting into the active site, competitive reversible inhibitors work by remaining unreacted as they have a different structure to the substrate. This means that fewer substrate molecules are able to bind to the enzyme, and so the reaction rate is decreased. As the inhibitor and substrate are competing, the level of inhibition depends on the relative concentrations of inhibitor and substrate i.e. the inhibition can be overcome by increasing the concentration of substrates. 

Non-competitive reversible enzyme inhibitors work by preventing the formation of enzyme-product complexes. They bind to a site on the enzyme that is not the active site, which changes the 3D tertiary structure of the enzyme. This means the enzyme is unable to catalyse the reaction, and so the substrate cannot form the product. The inhibitor is not competing with substrate here, and so non-competitive inhibitors are unaffected by substrate concentrations. It should be noted, non-competitive inhibitors can also be irreversible. 

Uncompetitive reversible enzyme inhibitors bind only to the substrate-enzyme complex. Therefore, these inhibitors require that an enzyme-substrate complex to be formed. 

____

Enzyme inhibitors play an important role in organisms, as they are used to regulate metabolic reactions. For example, the final product in a metabolic pathway can feedback and act as a non-competitive inhibitor to one of the earlier enzymes, which will in turn reduce the amount of product being formed. This means that the metabolic reaction can control itself, as more product will cause more pathway inhibition, so less product forms - this is called feedback inhibition. 

Enzyme inhibitors function to slow down the rate of an enzyme catalysed reaction by interfering with the enzyme in some form. There are two main types of inhibitors: 

1. Irreversible inhibitors - these molecules bind permanently to the enzyme. This means the enzyme is changed, and so its active site can no longer bind to its substrate molecule. Therefore, irreversible inhibitors effectively reduce the number of functioning enzymes available, which slows the rate of reaction. An example of an irreversible inhibitor is a metabolic poison called potassium cyanide - this works by irreversibly inhibiting the enzyme cytochrome oxidase, which is found in the electron transport chain (an essential part of respiration in our cells). If there is a reduced number of functioning cytochrome oxidase enzymes, ATP production is limited and this can have fatal consequences. 

2. Reversible inhibitors - these molecules bind temporarily to the enzyme, thus the inhibition is reversible. Competitive reversible inhibitors can be competitive, uncompetitive and non-competitive.

Competitive reversible enzyme inhibitors work by 'competing' with the substrate for the active site on the enzyme, as they have a similar shape to the substrate molecule. Despite fitting into the active site, competitive reversible inhibitors work by remaining unreacted as they have a different structure to the substrate. This means that fewer substrate molecules are able to bind to the enzyme, and so the reaction rate is decreased. As the inhibitor and substrate are competing, the level of inhibition depends on the relative concentrations of inhibitor and substrate i.e. the inhibition can be overcome by increasing the concentration of substrates. 

Non-competitive reversible enzyme inhibitors work by preventing the formation of enzyme-product complexes. They bind to a site on the enzyme that is not the active site, which changes the 3D tertiary structure of the enzyme. This means the enzyme is unable to catalyse the reaction, and so the substrate cannot form the product. The inhibitor is not competing with substrate here, and so non-competitive inhibitors are unaffected by substrate concentrations. It should be noted, non-competitive inhibitors can also be irreversible. 

Uncompetitive reversible enzyme inhibitors bind only to the substrate-enzyme complex. Therefore, these inhibitors require that an enzyme-substrate complex to be formed. 

____

Enzyme inhibitors play an important role in organisms, as they are used to regulate metabolic reactions. For example, the final product in a metabolic pathway can feedback and act as a non-competitive inhibitor to one of the earlier enzymes, which will in turn reduce the amount of product being formed. This means that the metabolic reaction can control itself, as more product will cause more pathway inhibition, so less product forms - this is called feedback inhibition. 

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1 year ago

909 views

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