Hannah O. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Physics tutor, ...

Hannah O.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Physics (Masters) - Warwick University

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About me

Hello! My name's Hannah and I am currently studying Physics at the University of Warwick.

As a lifelong enthusiast, I understand how wibbly-wobbly physics can get at times. It can be tricky to wrap your head around all of the formulae and theories your teacher throws at you. In our sessions, I will aim to make things a lot clearer, even if you're a visual learner and need me to draw out a diagram, or more hands-on and want us to go through a few questions straight away. Physics is a beautiful subject, and I aspire to help more people see that.

Mathematics is also important to me. Commonly referred to as "the language of science", it is key to have a clear understanding of the subject past using a calculator. Whether you need to brush up on your algebra or hyperbolics, just give me the word and I'll go through it as many times as you need.

Thank you for visiting my page, I hope to see you soon :)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Further Mathematics GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
PhysicsA-LevelA
MathA-LevelA*
Further MathA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 9 customer reviews

David (Parent) November 2 2016

This was my daughters first tutorial with Hannah, we had great communication prior to set up the session and the subject was covered in detail and structured in a manner that my daughter fully understood and built on the understanding that she had gained from school. Excellent

David (Parent) November 30 2016

Connie (Student) November 30 2016

Saran (Student) November 24 2016

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Questions Hannah has answered

Define the terms "acceleration" and "displacement". Explain simple harmonic motion with reference to both of these quantities.

Firstly, acceleration is the rate of change of velocity of an object, measured in ms-2 (read as metres per second squared, or metres per second per second). It can be either positive, indicating an increase in velocity through time, or negative, which represents the object slowing down. Like v...

Firstly, acceleration is the rate of change of velocity of an object, measured in ms-2 (read as metres per second squared, or metres per second per second). It can be either positive, indicating an increase in velocity through time, or negative, which represents the object slowing down. Like velocity, it is a vectorial quantity, meaning it has a direction as well as a magnitude.

Displacement is also a vector, this time referring to the position of the object from its start point. It is independent of the path the object has travelled, for example if a ball is fired straight up into the air from the ground, reaches a height of 5m, and then drops back to the same point from which it was fired, the displacement would be equal to zero, despite having travelled a total distance of 10m.

Throughout A-level, you will likely encounter two variations of simple harmonic motion: a mass on a spring, and a simple pendulum. These both follow the same principle. Both systems start in an "equilibrium position" - this means that the forces acting on the system are balanced, and hence the system will not move. If the mass on the spring was stretched from its equilibrium position and then let go, the system would begin to oscillate due to the elastic restoring force. When there is positive displacement (the spring is stretched out), this restoring force attempts to contract the spring, and vice-versa when there is negative displacement. The greater the displacement of the mass, the greater the restoring force in the spring, and hence the greater the acceleration of the mass back to its equilibrium position. The relation between displacement and acceleration can be seen in the equation:

                                                                    a = -(2πf)2x

This makes it clear that the magnitude of the acceleration a is directly proportional to the displacement x as mentioned previously, and that the mass accelerates towards the equilibrium position.

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