Nick L. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor

Nick L.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: Mathematics and Computer Science (Masters) - York University

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1 review| 7 completed tutorials

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About me

About Me:

I am a student at the University of York, currently in my third year of a 4 year Masters course studying Mathematics and Computer Science. I have a strong interest in both halves of this joint honours course but my main passion lies with mathematics. I have been passionate about it from an early age and I hope to encourage more students to flourish in the subject.

I am enthusiastic about sharing knowledge, being friendly and positive whilst doing so. I have had work experience teaching in schools, helped with maths lessons during free periods at secondary school, and have even spent many years teaching young children how to horse ride with 1-1 sessions

About The Sessions:

I want the sessions to be driven by you. Most school lessons are designed to cater for a large group of varying abilities, so this is your chance to learn at your speed. If there are things that you struggle with, we’ll go over them in more detail; if there are things that you find quite easy, we’ll find ways of pushing you further.

Maths isn’t everyone’s favourite subject, and can be daunting to many, but hopefully we can change this by helping you to gain a better understanding.

Getting In Touch:

If you have any questions, please send me a message. Just highlight what exam board or course you’re doing, and any issues you’re struggling with!

I look forward to hearing from you!

About Me:

I am a student at the University of York, currently in my third year of a 4 year Masters course studying Mathematics and Computer Science. I have a strong interest in both halves of this joint honours course but my main passion lies with mathematics. I have been passionate about it from an early age and I hope to encourage more students to flourish in the subject.

I am enthusiastic about sharing knowledge, being friendly and positive whilst doing so. I have had work experience teaching in schools, helped with maths lessons during free periods at secondary school, and have even spent many years teaching young children how to horse ride with 1-1 sessions

About The Sessions:

I want the sessions to be driven by you. Most school lessons are designed to cater for a large group of varying abilities, so this is your chance to learn at your speed. If there are things that you struggle with, we’ll go over them in more detail; if there are things that you find quite easy, we’ll find ways of pushing you further.

Maths isn’t everyone’s favourite subject, and can be daunting to many, but hopefully we can change this by helping you to gain a better understanding.

Getting In Touch:

If you have any questions, please send me a message. Just highlight what exam board or course you’re doing, and any issues you’re struggling with!

I look forward to hearing from you!

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 1 customer review
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Deborah (Parent)

October 25 2016

Nick was organised and ready for our session. He explained anything I needed clarity with clearly and well. He was patient and I felt comfortable saying if I did not know how to do any of the maths questions. He then broke the question down into smaller tasks so I could understand what to do. Nick also gave advice and tips on how to make sure I gain maximum marks for each question on a maths paper.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)B

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MathsA Level£20 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Nick has answered

Given that y = 5x^2 - 4/(x^3), x not equal to 0, find dy/dx.

y = 5x2 - 4/x3

1/x can be written as x-1, which means our equation can also be written as y = 5x2 - 4x-3.

dy/dx means that we need to differentiate y in terms of x.

To differentiate an equation, we need to multiply the coefficient (the number before the x) by its power (the smaller number above it), and then subtract 1 from the power. This must be done for all parts of the equation.

We can split up the equation and do the working bit by bit, so first lets look at "5x2":

Multiplying the coefficient by the power, we get 5 X 2 = 10, and then 2 - 1 = 1, which means the differential of 5x2 is 10x1, and the ^1 can be dropped to get 10x.

Looking at the second part "-4x-3":

-4 X -3 = 12, and -3 - 1 = -4, so the differential of -4x-3 is 12x-4, which can also be written as 12/x4 (reversing the rule we used earlier).

So putting the two parts back together, we get dy/dx = 10x + 12/x4.

It is also important to note that the question specified x is not equal to 0, and this is due to the fact that division by 0 can have a significant effect on an equation, with any number divided by 0 equalling infinity, a very difficult number to quantify or use.

y = 5x2 - 4/x3

1/x can be written as x-1, which means our equation can also be written as y = 5x2 - 4x-3.

dy/dx means that we need to differentiate y in terms of x.

To differentiate an equation, we need to multiply the coefficient (the number before the x) by its power (the smaller number above it), and then subtract 1 from the power. This must be done for all parts of the equation.

We can split up the equation and do the working bit by bit, so first lets look at "5x2":

Multiplying the coefficient by the power, we get 5 X 2 = 10, and then 2 - 1 = 1, which means the differential of 5x2 is 10x1, and the ^1 can be dropped to get 10x.

Looking at the second part "-4x-3":

-4 X -3 = 12, and -3 - 1 = -4, so the differential of -4x-3 is 12x-4, which can also be written as 12/x4 (reversing the rule we used earlier).

So putting the two parts back together, we get dy/dx = 10x + 12/x4.

It is also important to note that the question specified x is not equal to 0, and this is due to the fact that division by 0 can have a significant effect on an equation, with any number divided by 0 equalling infinity, a very difficult number to quantify or use.

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1 year ago

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