Rudolfs G. A Level Maths tutor, IB Maths tutor, A Level Physics tutor...

Rudolfs G.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Physics BSc (Bachelors) - Manchester University

5.0
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

2 reviews| 8 completed tutorials

Contact Rudolfs

About me

Hi, my name is Rudolfs and I'm a second year Physics student at the University of Manchester. I'm currently expected to achieve a 1st and I've achieved 41 points in the International Baccalaureate, therefore I believe that I am capable of helping you with any difficulties you might be facing with the material.

The Sessions

I believe that confusion often stems from the fact that teachers approach a problem only in a single way or if they skim over it quickly, so one of my main goals would be to achieve fundamental understanding of the problem at hand by going through it slowly or in a different manner. In addition, a proper exam technique is crucial to getting good results, therefore we will also discuss time management and past papers. Lastly, I can offer feedback for Internal Assessments in Economics as I found others' opinions very useful when I was writing them myself.

NOTE: When messaging me, please let me know what topics specifically you're looking to get help with.

Hi, my name is Rudolfs and I'm a second year Physics student at the University of Manchester. I'm currently expected to achieve a 1st and I've achieved 41 points in the International Baccalaureate, therefore I believe that I am capable of helping you with any difficulties you might be facing with the material.

The Sessions

I believe that confusion often stems from the fact that teachers approach a problem only in a single way or if they skim over it quickly, so one of my main goals would be to achieve fundamental understanding of the problem at hand by going through it slowly or in a different manner. In addition, a proper exam technique is crucial to getting good results, therefore we will also discuss time management and past papers. Lastly, I can offer feedback for Internal Assessments in Economics as I found others' opinions very useful when I was writing them myself.

NOTE: When messaging me, please let me know what topics specifically you're looking to get help with.

Show more

No DBS Icon

No DBS Check

Ratings & Reviews

5from 2 customer reviews
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Hannah (Student)

December 4 2016

very clear and we did plenty of past paper questions - very helpful

Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Hannah (Student)

November 20 2016

Very helpful - very clearly explained.

Show more reviews

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
Physics HLInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
Mathematics HLInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
Computer Science SLInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
English language and literature SLInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
Latvian literature HLInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
Economics HLInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EconomicsGCSE£18 /hr
MathsIB£20 /hr
PhysicsIB£20 /hr

Questions Rudolfs has answered

Why are UK government gilt (bond) yields rising and why is that bad?

A bond or a gilt is a way of borrowing money for corporations or governments. For example, if an imaginary government wanted to borrow $100, it could issue a single bond, and an investor could buy that bond for that price on the condition that the government will pay, say, interest of 5% of the face value of the bond for 5 years, meaning the investor will receive 100*5%=$5 for 5 years. After the 5 years have passed, the government will repay the original $100 to the investor.

In the example above, the yield of the bond is the same as the interest, i.e. 5%, if we assume that the bond's value remains constant at $100. However, in the real world, bonds are traded in the open market between investors, who have many alternative investment opportunities available, for example putting their money in a savings account instead of buying a bond. For this reason, the market value of bonds’ changes with time, e.g. if previously the government bond cost $100 and paid 5% of its original value ($5), then after some time the bond could be priced at $80, but the amount it would pay to the investor would be the same, i.e. $5. Therefore, the yield of the bond has changed from $5/$100=5% to $5/$80=6.25%, in other words, falling bond prices result in higher yields.

Recently the UK government bond yield has increased, which means that the price of UK bonds has dropped, signalling lower demand for UK bonds. This is thought to be a bad thing because this price drop followed Theresa May’s speech about ‘hard Brexit’, meaning foreign investors’ confidence in the UK economy has dropped due to leaving EU and they are afraid that the value of the pound will drop further because of this, so they are investing elsewhere instead of buying UK bonds.

A bond or a gilt is a way of borrowing money for corporations or governments. For example, if an imaginary government wanted to borrow $100, it could issue a single bond, and an investor could buy that bond for that price on the condition that the government will pay, say, interest of 5% of the face value of the bond for 5 years, meaning the investor will receive 100*5%=$5 for 5 years. After the 5 years have passed, the government will repay the original $100 to the investor.

In the example above, the yield of the bond is the same as the interest, i.e. 5%, if we assume that the bond's value remains constant at $100. However, in the real world, bonds are traded in the open market between investors, who have many alternative investment opportunities available, for example putting their money in a savings account instead of buying a bond. For this reason, the market value of bonds’ changes with time, e.g. if previously the government bond cost $100 and paid 5% of its original value ($5), then after some time the bond could be priced at $80, but the amount it would pay to the investor would be the same, i.e. $5. Therefore, the yield of the bond has changed from $5/$100=5% to $5/$80=6.25%, in other words, falling bond prices result in higher yields.

Recently the UK government bond yield has increased, which means that the price of UK bonds has dropped, signalling lower demand for UK bonds. This is thought to be a bad thing because this price drop followed Theresa May’s speech about ‘hard Brexit’, meaning foreign investors’ confidence in the UK economy has dropped due to leaving EU and they are afraid that the value of the pound will drop further because of this, so they are investing elsewhere instead of buying UK bonds.

Show more

1 year ago

736 views

Why is centripetal acceleration directed inwards to the centre of the circle during centripetal motion? If I’m in a car while it’s cornering, I seem to be pushed outwards away from the centre, not inwards.

When I initially met this problem, I was slightly confused because of the car analogy above. So the way to think about this is that your body and the car are separate, and just as the car starts going around the corner, your body wants to move in a straight line. However, you’re stopped from going in a straight line by the car’s door or by friction with the car’s interior (depending on where you’re sitting), so even though you may feel that you’re pushed outwards, the net force is actually inwards, resulting in you doing centripetal motion.

When I initially met this problem, I was slightly confused because of the car analogy above. So the way to think about this is that your body and the car are separate, and just as the car starts going around the corner, your body wants to move in a straight line. However, you’re stopped from going in a straight line by the car’s door or by friction with the car’s interior (depending on where you’re sitting), so even though you may feel that you’re pushed outwards, the net force is actually inwards, resulting in you doing centripetal motion.

Show more

1 year ago

491 views

Arrange a free online meeting


To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Rudolfs

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok