Alexandra L. A Level Further Mathematics  tutor, A Level Maths tutor,...
£18 - £20 /hr

Alexandra L.

Degree: Aeronautical and Aerospace Engineering (Bachelors) - Leeds University

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About me

About Me

I’m an Aerospace Engineering student at Leeds University. I have long loved tinkering and seeing how things work; to me, science is just the formal extension of this curiosity. Throughout sixth form I helped run the school societies for physics, engineering, chemistry and biology/medicine, where we presented 30 minute lectures to secondary students and tried to show everyone the fun stuff that often gets left out of the curriculum: how do rocket engines work? Why do some jellyfish glow? And what rare disease makes your skeleton grow together?

For many students, the stress of GCSEs and A-levels take the wonder out of maths and the sciences; I believe this shouldn’t be the case. My aim in our sessions is both to prepare you for your exams and to return the spice to science.

The Sessions

The sessions are guided by what you want to cover. If there’s a specific area you’re struggling with, we can pick right up where your teacher left off so you go back into class ready for any test. Or you might be looking for more long-term help, in which case we’ll start by covering the specification requirements for your exam board and making sure you really get the key concepts. Then we’ll build on those concepts with example questions and case studies, linking lesson content to the real world so you’ll see how your hard work matters beyond just passing the exams.

By the end of the hour, I want you to feel you’ve made a quantifiable step forward with your subject understanding and to gain confidence in your abilities. Along with this I hope you’ll also gain a new enjoyment of science and maths.

Contact Me

Feel free to send me a webmail if you have any questions! The first 'Meet the Tutor' session is free and I'm very friendly, so don't hesitate to drop me a line.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Further MathsA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
ChemistryA-LevelA
MathematicsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Questions Alexandra has answered

Simplify 5(x-1)^2/25(x^2-1)

The first thing to notice in this fraction is that the constants 5 and 25 can be simplified by cancelling down straight away. 5/25 = 1/5 The expression thus becomes (x-1)2/5(x2-1). Next we focus on the bracket contents. Examining the denominator shows us that it can be factorised - it's the d...

The first thing to notice in this fraction is that the constants 5 and 25 can be simplified by cancelling down straight away. 5/25 = 1/5 The expression thus becomes (x-1)2/5(x2-1).

Next we focus on the bracket contents. Examining the denominator shows us that it can be factorised - it's the difference of two squares! You can tell this because both terms x2 and 1 are perfect squares. Therefore the denominator can be broken up into its factors (x+1)(x-1) and the overall expression now looks like (x-1)2/5(x-1)(x+1).

Because the numerator and denominator both have a factor of (x-1), we can cancel out one of the (x-1) brackets for both the top and bottom. This gives us (x-1)/5(x+1). We know this cannot be simplified further because (x-1) and (x+1) are not multiples of each other and there are no other constants to cancel.

Finally, we can multiply out the brackets in the denominator and we get (x-1)/(5x+5). Be careful that you multiply each term in (x+1) by 5. 5(x+1) is not the same as (5x+1); the 1 needs to be multiplied by 5 as well.

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3 weeks ago

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