Robert W. A Level Geography tutor, GCSE Geography tutor, A Level Exte...
£18 - £20 /hr

Robert W.

Degree: Geography (Bachelors) - Exeter University

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About me

About me:

I am currently studying Geography at Exeter University. I offer tutoring in Geography (for GCSE and A-Level) and the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), both of which I gained an A* at A-Level. I have been enthusiastic about Geography for my entire life and so am able to make my tutorials a fun and exciting learning experience, drawing both from your syllabus and my wider knowledge.

Prior Experience:

At school, I was the Chair of the School Council, conductor of the orchestra and a prefect. In these roles, I had frequent meetings with younger students. I gained experience in mentoring Geography and I understand the need to explain concepts clearly. I am calm, patient and friendly, which has been shown by my teaching the piano to children and their success in graded examinations.

The sessions:

The tutorial content and lesson plans will be tailored directly to your needs using a wide range of visual and written communication in the virtual classroom. The sessions will be 55 minutes in length then a ‘summary’ section so we can review the key learning points of the session.

The EPQ is an excellent opportunity to develop useful skills for the workplace as it is marked on how you reach the final result. Therefore, I can teach you skills such as (but not limited to) report writing, research (especially questionnaires, letters and internet use), referencing, presentational, note-taking and planning. Showing that you have these vital skills to your supervisor will really boost your marks! I can provide assistance from the very beginning of the EPQ (your initial ideas for a project) right to the very end (the presentation and putting the whole project together).

Want to get started?

Great! Drop me an email or message on this website and we can get started! Please remember to tell me your exam board and any particular topics that you are struggling with. This is so I can create a plan as to what will we will discuss in the sessions. I look forward to meeting you! 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Extended Project Qualification A Level £20 /hr
Geography A Level £20 /hr
Geography GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
GeographyA-LevelA*
Extended Project QualificationA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelB
Government & PoliticsA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Questions Robert has answered

Explain the formation of a meander.

Explaining the formation of a meander is a common question at both GCSE and A-Level. The answer given below is for an A-Level response. Answering this question may also involve drawing a small annotated sketch of a meander as well as a substantial paragraph of explanation. The formation of a ...

Explaining the formation of a meander is a common question at both GCSE and A-Level. The answer given below is for an A-Level response.

Answering this question may also involve drawing a small annotated sketch of a meander as well as a substantial paragraph of explanation.

The formation of a meander can often be explained in a series of key steps (remember that geographical terms are very important here):

1. Due to banks of sediment at the bottom of the river (which are deposited at times of low flow, that is, a low velocity and low discharge, meaning deposition increases), the river weaves around these alternating shallow and deeper sections (riffles and pools) on what was an initially straight channel.

2. This movement targets one bank of the section after the riffle, subsequently leading to erosion (carried out by hydraulic action and abrasion) – this becomes the outside bend of the meander.

3. This leads to the formation of a river cliff on the outside bend. The material eroded further upstream is deposited on the opposite bank (inside bend) on the slip off slope. This is due to a corkscrew movement in the river (helicoidal flow) which results in water levels on the outside of a meander bend to be elevated, giving a faster velocity (the Thalweg line is located here). The deposition on the inside bend gives an asymmetrical cross section of the channel. The Thalweg line is the line of maximum water velocity down the path of the river.

4. Erosion and deposition continues which leads to the meanders becoming more curved. This eventually results in ‘meander migration’ – i.e. these processes shift downstream and are not static in one particular location. 

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2 months ago

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Use one or more examples to explain why people migrate within the European Union.

This very topical GCSE question in the ‘Population Change’ topic asks you to explain why people move between countries that are part of the European Union (EU). As the question asks you to use ‘examples’ you need to refer to specific places, for example, there was lots of migration occurring ...

This very topical GCSE question in the ‘Population Change’ topic asks you to explain why people move between countries that are part of the European Union (EU).

As the question asks you to use ‘examples’ you need to refer to specific places, for example, there was lots of migration occurring across the EU after 2004 when many Eastern European countries such as Poland joined the European Union.

You then need to explain why people were migrating e.g. some Polish citizens moved to countries such as the UK in search of better jobs (reference to push/pull factors), better standard of living and better education. Higher wages in the UK meant that money (remittances) was sent back home (also because Polish currency was weak)– this can encourage the development of the home country for their relatives (i.e. better quality of life etc.).

You could refer to recent issues such as the collapse of the Greek economy which encouraged Greek citizens to move to other EU countries in search of work. 

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2 months ago

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What is the difference between qualitative and quantitative data?

This is a common question at A-Level, especially in a Geographical Skills paper. You may be required to give examples of each type of data. Qualitative data is usually descriptive data such as the collection of people’s opinions or perspectives on an issue, and is therefore generally more sub...

This is a common question at A-Level, especially in a Geographical Skills paper. You may be required to give examples of each type of data.

Qualitative data is usually descriptive data such as the collection of people’s opinions or perspectives on an issue, and is therefore generally more subjective. The most common form of qualitative data are open-ended questionnaire responses or conversation analysis, for example.

Quantitative data is generally numerical (or can be placed into categories) and is therefore more objective in nature. Examples include river velocity data or pedestrian counts. This data is easy to put into a table and graphs and can then be made ready to be analysed further. 

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2 months ago

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