Riccardo P. A Level Italian tutor, A Level Latin tutor, A Level Maths...
£18 - £20 /hr

Riccardo P.

Degree: Physics (Bachelors) - Imperial College London University

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About me

Hi, I'm Riccardo, a physics fresher at London's Imperial College from Milan. As you can imagine I really like physics and maths, but that doesn't mean I'll spend all my time studying! I'm an active guy who loves sports (boxing, diving and jogging) and also enjoys cooking.

I've always helped some friends studying during highschool and they always told me I could have been a good tutor, so last year I actually joined a free tutoring program with my highschool (and 3 students I met there then called me for private tutoring). I think patience is key: I have no problems explaining the same concept over and over until you get it and can apply it in exercises. I also like to add a funny note to make the tutoring less boring, so expect jokes from time to time.

I usually make vey flexible plans for a session as I prefer you telling me what we need to go through: if you can't figure out how to solve a problem or an excercise in particular, we can start from that and then work our way back to the theory; on the other hand if you want to be more confident with the concepts, I will be glad to explain them and make sure you get them before moving on.

I'm looking forward to meet you :)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Italian A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Italian GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr
Italian IB £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
national exam (maturità)A-Level100 con lode
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Questions Riccardo has answered

How do I differentiate something in the form f(x)/g(x)?

To differentiate the quotient of two functions f(x)/g(x) you can use the quotient rule, the formula of which is: (f'(x)*g(x)-f(x)*g'(x))/g2(x) it is important to remember which part you have to differentiate first: let's pick our f(x)/g(x) again the trick I used was thinking that in the deriv...

To differentiate the quotient of two functions f(x)/g(x) you can use the quotient rule, the formula of which is: (f'(x)*g(x)-f(x)*g'(x))/g2(x)

it is important to remember which part you have to differentiate first: let's pick our f(x)/g(x) again

the trick I used was thinking that in the derivative the denominator has to be squared (g2(x)), so it gets "tired". Therefore, in the first part of our numerator, f(x) will be derived while g(x) rests and remains the same, and to that we will subtract f(x) multiplied by the derivative of g(x)

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2 months ago

65 views

what are the differences between Caesar's style and Cicerone's?

Caesar style consists in short and clear periods, using mostly coordinate sentences (parataxis), which makes him a pretty easy author to tranlsate . On the other hand Cicerone, being an orator, had to impress the jury with his speeches: that's why his periods are long and made of many subordin...

Caesar style consists in short and clear periods, using mostly coordinate sentences (parataxis), which makes him a pretty easy author to tranlsate . On the other hand Cicerone, being an orator, had to impress the jury with his speeches: that's why his periods are long and made of many subordinate sentences, linkers and figures of speech such as anaphoras, mataphors and antithesis.

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2 months ago

61 views

what does it mean to "dare del lei" to somebody?

In Italian when you have to show respect to a person (somebody you don't know, an older person, a colleague, a teacher... basically everybody who's not a friend) you don't address him a "tu" (you) but as "lei" (third person female pronoun), and therefore you have to decline verbs, pronouns and...

In Italian when you have to show respect to a person (somebody you don't know, an older person, a colleague, a teacher... basically everybody who's not a friend) you don't address him a "tu" (you) but as "lei" (third person female pronoun), and therefore you have to decline verbs, pronouns and adjectvies accordingly.

For example if you were to ask a stranger "excuse me, can you tell me where the bus stop is?" you wouldn't say " scusa, mi puoi dire dov'è la fermata del bus" but " mi scusi, mi può dire dov'è la fermata del bus".

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2 months ago

72 views
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