Rhys T. GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE English tutor, 11 Plus English tutor...

Rhys T.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Medicine (Bachelors) - Nottingham University

5.0
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29 reviews| 22 completed tutorials

Contact Rhys

About me

About Me:

I am a fourth year medical student at the University of Nottingham. I have always loved teaching and have a real passion for sharing my knowledge and love for the sciences with others.

I am very patient, approachable and friendly. I have been a swimming teacher since the age of 13, teaching both children and adults and also act as a tutor to younger medical students, so have a lot of experience teaching. As a student I also volunteer for the East Midlands Ambulance Service and compete in outdoor medicine competitions.

Teaching Sessions:

During the teaching sessions, we will cover what you want to focus on. In all subjects, understanding is the foundation to knowledge. If your foundations are strong, your knowledge of the subject content will be greater as a result.

It is because of this that we'll start by making sure you have solid foundations before moving on to exam questions.

My teaching methods are based upon whatever works for you. I can be very flexible and find that using a range of teaching techniques is most effective. These include pictures, diagrams, mneumonics, analogies and other techniques when appropriate. At the end of the day, I work to suit your needs.

Besides all of this, I hope the sessions can be fun and enjoyable! Knowledge is important, but only if you can enoy where it takes you!

Applications to Medical School:

Applying to medical school is a daunting process- I can vouch for that! I learnt a lot about the process in the lead up to my application, and have learnt even more since talking to clinical staff and doctors in my years at medical school who play a role in the application process. I hope that I'll be able to pass on that advice to you and make that UCAS application and interview seem less daunting when your turn comes around!

What next?

If you're interested or want to find out more then message me or book a 'Meet the Tutor' session! Remember to tell me your exam board and what you're struggling with.

I hope to meet you soon!

About Me:

I am a fourth year medical student at the University of Nottingham. I have always loved teaching and have a real passion for sharing my knowledge and love for the sciences with others.

I am very patient, approachable and friendly. I have been a swimming teacher since the age of 13, teaching both children and adults and also act as a tutor to younger medical students, so have a lot of experience teaching. As a student I also volunteer for the East Midlands Ambulance Service and compete in outdoor medicine competitions.

Teaching Sessions:

During the teaching sessions, we will cover what you want to focus on. In all subjects, understanding is the foundation to knowledge. If your foundations are strong, your knowledge of the subject content will be greater as a result.

It is because of this that we'll start by making sure you have solid foundations before moving on to exam questions.

My teaching methods are based upon whatever works for you. I can be very flexible and find that using a range of teaching techniques is most effective. These include pictures, diagrams, mneumonics, analogies and other techniques when appropriate. At the end of the day, I work to suit your needs.

Besides all of this, I hope the sessions can be fun and enjoyable! Knowledge is important, but only if you can enoy where it takes you!

Applications to Medical School:

Applying to medical school is a daunting process- I can vouch for that! I learnt a lot about the process in the lead up to my application, and have learnt even more since talking to clinical staff and doctors in my years at medical school who play a role in the application process. I hope that I'll be able to pass on that advice to you and make that UCAS application and interview seem less daunting when your turn comes around!

What next?

If you're interested or want to find out more then message me or book a 'Meet the Tutor' session! Remember to tell me your exam board and what you're struggling with.

I hope to meet you soon!

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01/03/2016

Ratings & Reviews

5from 29 customer reviews
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Peter (Parent)

April 8 2017

Great Tutor

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Mark (Student)

April 1 2017

a really good lesson. I learned a lot through Rhy's enthusiasm and determination

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Peter (Parent)

March 8 2017

Good tutorial

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Peter (Parent)

March 15 2017

Great as always

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
Modern HistoryA-level (A2)A
Human BiologyA-level (A2)A
Mathematics with StatisticsA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)B
Extended Project QualificationA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Human BiologyA Level£20 /hr
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
Human BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
ScienceGCSE£18 /hr
Maths13 Plus£18 /hr
Science13 Plus£18 /hr
Maths11 Plus£18 /hr
-Medical School Preparation-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Rhys has answered

What sort of work experience should I be trying to get and how much is appropriate?

Unfortunately, there is no simple answer to this question. A lot of the answer isn’t based on a pro forma tick list, but in understanding and proving your motives both to yourself and the medical schools you apply to.

Firstly, any experience is good experience. Many students find that after a few days in a clinical setting they know that medicine is not for them, and that’s completely fine! Much better to find out early on than at a later date.

Secondly, if you can’t get extensive experience in exciting areas that is also fine, not everyone has extensive family connections and people in the know- medical schools appreciate that.

Now, having said that, here are some options for you to look into, and try to gain experience in. These are broad categories, but each area is worth considering.

General Practice: Good to gain an understanding of common clinical conditions, the work done in a community setting and the importance of good communication skills.

Hospital Medicine: This covers a large spectrum of areas such as cardiology, respiratory and rheumatology. The key here is to appreciate how patients present from the community and how hospital medicine differs from that in the community. A big thing to look into is the multidisciplinary team and how it works.

Surgery: Often difficult to get into at a young age. What’s interesting is the broad spectrum of diseases that can be investigated, managed or even remedied through invasive intervention.

Other areas of interest include any medical setting such as a pharmacy, care home or alternatively shadowing healthcare workers such as physiotherapist’s, nurses, health care assistant’s etc.

While these are some broad categories to look into, there’s one thing that I believe to be essential, and that is volunteer work. This work would preferably be in a healthcare setting but doesn’t need to be. The reason this is essential is because it shows sustained interest and commitment. This is vital knowledge to the medical school, as medicine is a long course which puts a lot of demands on you. To be able to demonstrate this commitment to the medical school will put you ahead in your personal statement and give you a lot to talk about at interview.

Finally, this brings me to the key message I have regarding work experience, and this is that your exact experiences matter little, as does the quantity of it. What is important is your ability to reflect upon and learn from the work experience you gain as it is this which you should be emphasising in your personal statement.

Unfortunately, there is no simple answer to this question. A lot of the answer isn’t based on a pro forma tick list, but in understanding and proving your motives both to yourself and the medical schools you apply to.

Firstly, any experience is good experience. Many students find that after a few days in a clinical setting they know that medicine is not for them, and that’s completely fine! Much better to find out early on than at a later date.

Secondly, if you can’t get extensive experience in exciting areas that is also fine, not everyone has extensive family connections and people in the know- medical schools appreciate that.

Now, having said that, here are some options for you to look into, and try to gain experience in. These are broad categories, but each area is worth considering.

General Practice: Good to gain an understanding of common clinical conditions, the work done in a community setting and the importance of good communication skills.

Hospital Medicine: This covers a large spectrum of areas such as cardiology, respiratory and rheumatology. The key here is to appreciate how patients present from the community and how hospital medicine differs from that in the community. A big thing to look into is the multidisciplinary team and how it works.

Surgery: Often difficult to get into at a young age. What’s interesting is the broad spectrum of diseases that can be investigated, managed or even remedied through invasive intervention.

Other areas of interest include any medical setting such as a pharmacy, care home or alternatively shadowing healthcare workers such as physiotherapist’s, nurses, health care assistant’s etc.

While these are some broad categories to look into, there’s one thing that I believe to be essential, and that is volunteer work. This work would preferably be in a healthcare setting but doesn’t need to be. The reason this is essential is because it shows sustained interest and commitment. This is vital knowledge to the medical school, as medicine is a long course which puts a lot of demands on you. To be able to demonstrate this commitment to the medical school will put you ahead in your personal statement and give you a lot to talk about at interview.

Finally, this brings me to the key message I have regarding work experience, and this is that your exact experiences matter little, as does the quantity of it. What is important is your ability to reflect upon and learn from the work experience you gain as it is this which you should be emphasising in your personal statement.

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1 year ago

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