PremiumJonathan A. GCSE Economics tutor, A Level Economics tutor, IB Economi...

Jonathan A.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Economics (Masters) - University College London University

Contact Jonathan

About me

I am studying for an MSc in Economics at University College London. I did my undergraduate degree in Oxford studying Philosophy, Politics and Economics, and as a result am familiar with the tutorial system from the student's point of view. I am passionate about economics because it is an extremely useful tool for understanding the world, and provides a coherent framework for tackling many of the problems in modern society. The A level course is vital in instilling the fundamental intuitions and technical skills that help students succeed in a wide range of university degrees and career paths. As a practising economist, I believe driving home these insights from economics in one-to-one sessions is where I can add value to the student's learning. Philosophy is another passion of mine, particularly Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Epistemology. Not only do I think these areas are intrinsically interesting, but the practice of philosophy is immensely valuable for instilling a logical mindset.

About my sessions

My tutorials are often student-led in terms of the content that they want to go through, but I am flexible and can accommodate for a range of student objectives. I pay close attention to the syllabus for the courses I teach, but also try to put the material in a wider context and ground it in real-world examples, which I am able to do given the one-to-one attention these tutorials provide.

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Economics A Level £26 /hr
Government and Politics A Level £26 /hr
Maths A Level £26 /hr
Philosophy A Level £26 /hr
Economics GCSE £24 /hr
Government and Politics GCSE £24 /hr
Maths GCSE £24 /hr
Philosophy GCSE £24 /hr
Economics IB £26 /hr
Philosophy IB £26 /hr
-Oxbridge Preparation- Mentoring £26 /hr
.TSA. Oxford. Uni Admissions Test £28 /hr

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-levelA2A*
Further MathsA-levelA2A*
PhysicsA-levelA2A*
PoliticsA-levelA2A*
FrenchA-levelA2A
Philosophy, Politics and EconomicsDegree (Bachelors)2:1
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

Currently unavailable: for new students

Weeks availability
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Weeks availability
Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
MONDAYMONDAY
TUESDAYTUESDAY
WEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY
THURSDAYTHURSDAY
FRIDAYFRIDAY
SATURDAYSATURDAY
SUNDAYSUNDAY

Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

4.8from 25 customer reviews

George (Parent) August 2 2017

Good and informative session

Kemp (Student) June 21 2017

very useful session!

Bilal (Parent) March 8 2017

responds quickly and very informative tutor.

Bridie (Student) January 16 2017

Johnathon was really helpful, his subject knowledge was also very strong. I really appreciated how he took the time to look through the work prior to tutorials and think of the best explanations for me!
See all reviews

Questions Jonathan has answered

What are some advantages and disadvantages of the 'first-past-the-post' electoral system?

Under first-past-the-post (FPTP), as practiced in the UK, each constituency elects one MP by what is called plurality voting. This means, more or less, that the candidate with the most votes wins. One advantage of this system is that it is simple to understand and therefore does not need to be...

Under first-past-the-post (FPTP), as practiced in the UK, each constituency elects one MP by what is called plurality voting. This means, more or less, that the candidate with the most votes wins. One advantage of this system is that it is simple to understand and therefore does not need to be explained to voters. This is in contrast to some other systems such as STV, which requires voters to rank a large number of candidates, and employs a relatively obscure method of picking the winning candidates based on these preferences. Another advantage of FPTP is that it provides a strong MP-constituency link, with one MP devoted to the needs of a particular geographical area. This can be contrasted with the closed or open list proportional systems, which can have many representatives per constituency. In Israel, for example, the whole country is one big constituency. 

A disadvantage of FPTP is that it is not proportional, that is, parties' number of seats in the legislature do not accurately reflect the share of the popular vote in the election. FPTP tends to be biased towards bigger parties which can get more than 30% of the vote in a lot of constituencies. In 2005, the Labour party won a sizeable majority in the House of Commons with only 35.2% of the popular vote. Advocates of FPTP argue that this is actually a virtue of the system, as it allows for strong majority government even when no party commands majority support in the country as a whole.

see more

11 months ago

1297 views

What is the difference between accounting and economic profit?

Accounting profit is revenues minus explicit costs, which include wages and machine rental among other things. But there are also implicit costs, or opportunity costs. These can arise because the factors of production used by the firm (labour and capital) could potentially be used to make more...

Accounting profit is revenues minus explicit costs, which include wages and machine rental among other things. But there are also implicit costs, or opportunity costs. These can arise because the factors of production used by the firm (labour and capital) could potentially be used to make more money when put to another use. For example, say I start a business and take all the accounting profit for myself. If my firm requires 40 hours per week of my labour time, and only makes £40,000 accounting profit, when I could have made £50,000 working 40 hours per week for another firm, the economic profit is actually -£10,000. 

see more

11 months ago

520 views

What is the logical problem of evil?

The logical problem of evil is usually cast as an argument for the logical  inconsistency of a number of claims that traditional theism holds. These include the claims: 1) God exists 2) God is omnipotent 3) God is omniscient 4) God is perfectly good and 5) Evil exists. The argument says that st...

The logical problem of evil is usually cast as an argument for the logical inconsistency of a number of claims that traditional theism holds. These include the claims: 1) God exists 2) God is omnipotent 3) God is omniscient 4) God is perfectly good and 5) Evil exists. The argument says that statements 1-4 are inconsistent with 5, since an omniscient God would know about all evils, an omnipotent God would be able to prevent them, and a perfectly good God would have an overriding reason to do so. The logical problem of evil can then be cast as a deductive argument from the premise that evil does in fact exist to the conclusion that the God of traditional theism (omnipotent, omniscient, perfectly good) does not exist. The logical problem can be contrasted with the evidential problem of evil, which does not claim that just any evil would be inconsistent with God, but that the existence of the kind of terrible suffering which we know to exist gives good evidence for the conclusion that such a God does not exist.

see more

11 months ago

671 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Jonathan

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok