Ella F. A Level History of Art tutor, GCSE History of Art tutor, GCSE...
£18 - £20 /hr

Ella F.

Degree: History of Art (Bachelors) - York University

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About me

 I am a History of Art student at the University of York, a degree that combines my passions for art, history and literature.

 I am friendly and diligent, and also belive that learning should be an enjoyable experience.

 I have had work experience in museums including the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge and Blists Hill Victorian Town, where I demonstrated exhibits, and have also helped organise and perform a storytelling event at York Art Gallery.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English A Level £20 /hr
History of Art A Level £20 /hr
Art GCSE £18 /hr
English GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
History of Art GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
History of ArtA-LevelA*
English Language and LiteratureA-LevelA*
Modern HistoryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Questions Ella has answered

How should I structure paragraphs?

 The best way to structure your paragraphs for essays is to use the PEEL method. This stands for Point, Evidence, Explanation and Link.  By following this structure not only do you foreground your main point, but you can effectively organise an argument. Point: this is where you introduce the...

 The best way to structure your paragraphs for essays is to use the PEEL method. This stands for Point, Evidence, Explanation and Link.

 By following this structure not only do you foreground your main point, but you can effectively organise an argument.

Point: this is where you introduce the main argument of the paragraph. It only needs to be one or two sentences in length so be as concise as possible. As well as stating your argument, also briefly include why you believe this, for example ‘The fall of the Weimar Government was due to economic issues, such as hyperinflation in 1923’.

Evidence: Here is where you put down your main evidence to support your point. Evidence can be quotes from the text or source, or data and statistics. Try to aim for about three pieces of evidence.

Explanation: now you can draw together the Point and the Evidence. This should be the bulk of your paragraph and say why your evidence supports your point. The why is important here, as you can really push your point and form the crux of your argument.

Link: this short sentence at the end of your paragraph can boost your marks and cement your argument. Here you need to explain how your point relates to your larger argument, and therefore back to the main question. You can always use some keywords from the question here too.

 A good way to get used to the structure is to write practice essays and colour-code the sections, so you can see where the divisions lie.

 Although this method may seem repetitive for a full essay, it’s a useful structure than ensures you cover all the main factors the examiners are looking for. 

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What was the Renaissance?

The term ‘Renaissance’ comes from the French meaning ‘re-birth’, and refers to a renewed interest in classical antiquity in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries (sometimes referred to as the quattrocento and cinquecento).  It focuses around the theory of humanism, which was interested in the ...

The term ‘Renaissance’ comes from the French meaning ‘re-birth’, and refers to a renewed interest in classical antiquity in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries (sometimes referred to as the quattrocento and cinquecento).

 It focuses around the theory of humanism, which was interested in the potential of man, science, the natural world and the writing of Antiquity, especially Pliny and Vitruvius. Vitruvius wrote the only surviving treatise on architecture from Antiquity, which designated the rules of architecture and placed man at the centre, claiming him to be a perfectly proportioned being. This theory is visualised in Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man.

 As a result of this interest in Antiquity art and architecture began to borrow classical motifs, such as an interest in perfect proportions and perspective.

 The Renaissance is most closely associated with Italy, where rivalry between city states and wealthy patrons encouraged the development of an art market, and as the Renaissance progressed the status of artists increased significantly.

 The church were also major patrons at this time, with the Popes hoping to emulate the glory of ancient Rome. This was especially evident during the papacy of Julius II (Pope from 1503-1513) who saw himself as a second Julius Caesar, and therefore commissioned art to reflect this.

 However, the Renaissance also developed in Northern Europe, though retaining more elements of the gothic style. Oil paint was a major development in the north, and this was highly influential on the development of art in the south. The Northern Renaissance also had a greater focus on religious reform, culminating in Martin Luther’s ’95 Theses’ of 1517, which triggered the Protestant reformation. This had a significant effect on the catholic church, who reacted with the ‘counter-reformation’ which reasserted their principles. Art was a major factor in the counter-reformation.

 Developments in literature were also made in the Renaissance, again borrowing from the classical precedent. Writers such as Shakespeare emerged who included references to the developments of the time in their work.

 The Renaissance, therefore, does not solely relate to the emergence of classical forms in art and architecture. Instead it can be seen as a close link being established between religion, the arts and the advancement of learning.

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1 month ago

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