Kristina F. GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Chemistry...

Kristina F.

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Chemistry (Masters) - Durham University

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About me

Hi! I'm Kristina, and I've just started studying my favourite subject, Chemistry, at Durham University.

I'm passionate about science and maths as I enjoy challenges and problem-solving, and I love to learn about how amazing our world is. I find scientific concepts fascinating, but I can understand why they may seem daunting and bewildering!

I've always enjoyed helping people with science, from my classmates to the several GCSE students I tutored when I was in sixth form, and now I can do what I love more professionally.

I'm a dedicated person and I can guarantee that I'll try my best to help anyone looking for answers. I try to focus on depth of understanding of the subject, rather than just memorising facts, and my aim is to give you the best possible understanding of key concepts. I can also give you tips on how to revise in the most efficient way, so that you can reach your full potential.

I'm a friendly, approachably person, so don't be scared to send me a message!

Hi! I'm Kristina, and I've just started studying my favourite subject, Chemistry, at Durham University.

I'm passionate about science and maths as I enjoy challenges and problem-solving, and I love to learn about how amazing our world is. I find scientific concepts fascinating, but I can understand why they may seem daunting and bewildering!

I've always enjoyed helping people with science, from my classmates to the several GCSE students I tutored when I was in sixth form, and now I can do what I love more professionally.

I'm a dedicated person and I can guarantee that I'll try my best to help anyone looking for answers. I try to focus on depth of understanding of the subject, rather than just memorising facts, and my aim is to give you the best possible understanding of key concepts. I can also give you tips on how to revise in the most efficient way, so that you can reach your full potential.

I'm a friendly, approachably person, so don't be scared to send me a message!

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
Biology A-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
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tuesdays
wednesdays
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sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Kristina has answered

What does Avogadro's number mean?

Avogadro's number is simply used as a way of telling us how much of a substance we have. 

The number is 6.022 x 1023, and if we have that number of particles, we can make it easier by saying we have one mole of particles. The particles could be atoms of an element, molecules of a compound, or even sweets in a jar (but in Chemistry you'll only really be dealing with compounds and elements!)

For example, instead of saying we have 1.044 x 1024 atoms, its easier to say that we have 2 moles of atoms ([1.044 x 1024 ] / [6.022 x 1023] = 2), because the number is smaller and more manageable.

The reason Avogadro's number is so important is because it is the number of atoms in one mole of atoms- and the definition of a mole is the number of Carbon-12 atoms present in 12 grams of Carbon-12

This means if we have one mole of carbon-12 atoms (which have a relative atomic mass of 12), we have 12 grams of it. So Avogadro's number is used primarlily to convert between mass of a substance in grams, and the mass of a substance in terms of relative atomic mass (Ar), or relative molecular mass (Mr) if it's a compund.

The relationship is: number of moles = mass (g) / Ar

If we plug in the values from the definition, we see that the definition is consistent with the equation:

number of moles = 12 / 12 

                          = 1 mole

We can use this equation for any solid substance with a known atomic (or molecular) mass. For example:

Calculating the number of moles in 85g of Magnesium solid-

number of moles (n)= mass / Ar of magnesium

                          n = 85 / 24

                             = 3.5 mol (to 1 decimal place)

We can also use the equation for compounds, but we need to add up the Ars of each component to find the overall Mr.

E.g. 20g of NaOH(s). [NB: Mr of NaOH  = 23 + 16 + 1 = 40]

n = 20 / 40

   = 0.5 mol

Avogadro's number is simply used as a way of telling us how much of a substance we have. 

The number is 6.022 x 1023, and if we have that number of particles, we can make it easier by saying we have one mole of particles. The particles could be atoms of an element, molecules of a compound, or even sweets in a jar (but in Chemistry you'll only really be dealing with compounds and elements!)

For example, instead of saying we have 1.044 x 1024 atoms, its easier to say that we have 2 moles of atoms ([1.044 x 1024 ] / [6.022 x 1023] = 2), because the number is smaller and more manageable.

The reason Avogadro's number is so important is because it is the number of atoms in one mole of atoms- and the definition of a mole is the number of Carbon-12 atoms present in 12 grams of Carbon-12

This means if we have one mole of carbon-12 atoms (which have a relative atomic mass of 12), we have 12 grams of it. So Avogadro's number is used primarlily to convert between mass of a substance in grams, and the mass of a substance in terms of relative atomic mass (Ar), or relative molecular mass (Mr) if it's a compund.

The relationship is: number of moles = mass (g) / Ar

If we plug in the values from the definition, we see that the definition is consistent with the equation:

number of moles = 12 / 12 

                          = 1 mole

We can use this equation for any solid substance with a known atomic (or molecular) mass. For example:

Calculating the number of moles in 85g of Magnesium solid-

number of moles (n)= mass / Ar of magnesium

                          n = 85 / 24

                             = 3.5 mol (to 1 decimal place)

We can also use the equation for compounds, but we need to add up the Ars of each component to find the overall Mr.

E.g. 20g of NaOH(s). [NB: Mr of NaOH  = 23 + 16 + 1 = 40]

n = 20 / 40

   = 0.5 mol

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2 years ago

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