Tom W. GCSE Spanish tutor, A Level Spanish tutor, A Level Economics t...
£18 - £20 /hr

Tom W.

Degree: Spanish and Linguistics (Bachelors) - Lancaster University

Contact Tom
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Tom

About me

About Me 

Hi! My name is Tom Williamson, I am a first-year student at Lancaster University studying Spanish and Linguistics with Philosophy as a minor, and I'd love to help you with any of your Spanish needs! Whether these needs involve checking over essays, helping with tricky grammar, exam preparation, practising pronunciation, or anything else, I'm happy to help!

I studied Spanish, Economics and Classical Civilisation at A-level, and I got AAA, and, frustratingly, I was only 2 marks away from an A* in Spanish! At GCSE,  I studied 10 subjects and achieved 6 A*s and 4 As. 

I would say that I am a nice, friendly and approachable person. I am extremely hardworking and dedicated in everything I do - I strive for perfection! I'm a very sporty person; I play a lot of squash and football, but they're not my only hobbies - I also enjoy doing my Rubik's cubes.

I am not an inexperienced teacher either - I tutored a girl at GCSE Spanish to a B standard (up from a D) by helping her with just her oral and written exams (she had four: listening, reading, writing and oral). I also taught a group of Year 6 children in a Spanish club from an absolutely basic level to a level at which they were writing in full sentences in Spanish. 

The Lessons

Despite your learning in the lessons being, obviously, the most important thing, I also want you to have fun! Who wants to just sit there being spoken to for ages? I want to challenge what you think you know already, I want to develop and expand your knowledge and I want to create a spark of passion within you that will make you want to go and find out more.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Spanish A Level £20 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish IB £20 /hr
English 13 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £18 /hr
Spanish 13 Plus £18 /hr
English 11 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA
Economics A-LevelA
Classical Civilisation A-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

Weeks availability
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Weeks availability
Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
MONDAYMONDAY
TUESDAYTUESDAY
WEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY
THURSDAYTHURSDAY
FRIDAYFRIDAY
SATURDAYSATURDAY
SUNDAYSUNDAY

Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 6 customer reviews

NIRAJ (Parent) December 8 2016

Tom W. IS THE BEST TUTOR ON THIS WEBSITE. He is absolutely AMAZEBALLS at writing personal statements, and I seriously want to go over to University of Lancaster, rip off the hinges to his dorm room, and give this guy a big ass bear hug. Amazing work, seriously. This is the guy you want, his linguistic skills are OFF the roof, like seriously, he turned my essay from a bloody mess to an absolute masterpiece. 3.5 hours of continuous tutorial, and we are finally done. Time to smoke a much needed, celebratory blunt. #AMAZING

Issy (Student) November 30 2016

good lesson lots of new stuff to do and learn

Issy (Student) November 22 2016

enjoyed the lesson, learnt alot

Issy (Student) December 7 2016

See all reviews

Questions Tom has answered

How do I write a good essay in a foreign language?

This is something that can make the difference between a C and an A at A Level for languages. Speaking from my experience of Spanish A Level, there are a couple of things that you can do to up your writing game. 1. Speed up. I know this sounds counterintuitive, but if you spend too long think...

This is something that can make the difference between a C and an A at A Level for languages. Speaking from my experience of Spanish A Level, there are a couple of things that you can do to up your writing game.

1. Speed up. I know this sounds counterintuitive, but if you spend too long thinking about what words you're choosing or trying to use a particular structure (e.g. the subjunctive), you will lose what matters most: what you're actually trying to say. You can lose yourself and the semantics of the sentence very easily if you spend too much time staring at one line or one phrase. Just concentrate on getting what you want to get down on paper, and when you feel more comfortable, and start to gain greater written fluency, then you can take more time over it. Remember - you get more credit for what you say and how much it makes sense than how impressive your structures are in an A Level languages essay.

2. Learn to understand sentence structure. When you understand what you can do with a sentence, how they work in the foreign language you're learning (syntax works differently in different languages!) and what sounds good to a native, your essay writing will improve enormously. Learn how subordinate and coordinate clauses work in the target language. For Spanish particularly, a good understanding of relative clauses and relative pronouns is exceedingly useful. 

3. Keep it brief. Most language essays will have a tight word limit - mine were 400 words (+/- 10%) - so don't repeat yourself! Your examiner knows what a good point is, so don't state it at the start AND at the end of a paragraph. This goes for the introduction and the conclusion too - they aren't for merely talking about what you've written. Think about it: if that were their true purpose, their existence would be irrelevant. Instead, try to use them wisely. Use the introduction to make you sound clever - talk about the topic or title; discuss its nuances or define a word that might cause confusion. Use the conclusion to explain how and why you've come to the viewpoint you've come to in the essay. Coming down hard on one side of the argument can help you focus your argument and thus your conclusion, but if you're intelligent about it, you can sit on the fence in the conclusion and still write a great essay.

see more

2 months ago

57 views

What's the best way to learn verb conjugations?

The truth is, it varies from person to person. Some people like to get all colourful with their learning - they find that using differently coloured pens or differently coloured flashcards and notepads help to stick whatever they're learning in their mind. For others, repetition is key - just ...

The truth is, it varies from person to person. Some people like to get all colourful with their learning - they find that using differently coloured pens or differently coloured flashcards and notepads help to stick whatever they're learning in their mind. For others, repetition is key - just simply going over and over a verb table or a tense can do the job. What I found that worked for me is learning about the individual words themselves - learning the etymology or cognates of verbs and verb endings, I find, really facilitates mass-learning as each word begins to stand apart from the others; you really begin not just to know what you're trying to memorise, but you also begin to understand and appreciate the words themselves, making them stick out more, and easier to remember as a result. 

see more

2 months ago

56 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Tom

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok