Laura V. A Level English Language tutor, GCSE English Language tutor,...
£18 - £20 /hr

Laura V.

Degree: French Studies and English Language (Bachelors) - Birmingham University

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About me

About Me

I am a final year student at University of Birmingham studying French and English Language. I have always loved languages and travel, and have a near-native language of french as I have been speaking it all of my life. 

I am a patient tutor with a love for my subjects, and have experience in tutoring already. I help GCSE french students prepare for their french oral exams every year, and I also have a TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) qualification which means that I am very confident in tutoring foreign languages and have a high understanding of the complexities of English Grammar. 

The Sessions:

The sessions we have together will be based on the areas in which you need the most help. For English Language sessions we can go over linguistic theories until you fully understand them, or work on your grammar knowledge until grammatical analyses don't seem scary anymore!

For French sessions we can work on the four main areas: speaking, listening, writing and reading. A mixture of oral roleplays, vocabulary games and grammar sessions will mean that you will soon feel confident enough to express yourself in both spoken and written situations. 

Get in touch

If you're interested in booking a session or would like more information please feel free to message me via 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor' session. I look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Language A Level £20 /hr
French A Level £20 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
French 13 Plus £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
FrenchA-LevelA
English LanguageA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Questions Laura has answered

How do I use the perfect and imperfect tenses?

There are two different kind of past tense in French: the Perfect Tense and the Imperfect Tense. Both tenses have different uses. 1.Perfect Tense (Passé Composé): Using the Perfect Tense The perfect tense is used when you are talking about a one-off, completed action in the past. For examp...

There are two different kind of past tense in French: the Perfect Tense and the Imperfect Tense. Both tenses have different uses.

1.Perfect Tense (Passé Composé):

Using the Perfect Tense

The perfect tense is used when you are talking about a one-off, completed action in the past. For example:

Last week, I ate a sandwich = La semaine dernière, j’ai mangé un sandwich.

Yesterday, I spoke to my sister = Hier, j’ai parlé avec ma sœur.

Forming the Perfect Tense

The Perfect Tense is made of two parts: the auxiliary verb AVOIR + the past participle of the main verb.

Most verbs take AVOIR when in the perfect tense (see lesson on ETRE and the Perfect Tense for verbs that take être)

Each pronoun conjugates AVOIR in a different way:

J’ai + past participle of main verb

Tu as + past participle of main verb

Il / Elle / On a + past participle of main verb

Nous avons + past participle of main verb

Vous avez + past participle of main verb

Ils / Elles ont + past participle of main verb

What is the past participle?

To get the past participle for regular verbs that are used with avoir:

For –er verbs, take off the –er and add -é.   Manger > mangé (ate)

For –ir verbs, take off the –ir and add –i.    Finir > fini (finished)

For –re verbs, take off the –re and add –u.    Vendre > vendu (sold)

Common Irregulars:

lire > lu (read)

boire > bu (drank)

voir > vu (saw)

2.Imperfect Tense (Imparfait)

When is the imperfect tense used?

The imperfect tense is used for descriptions or to describe events that used to happen regularly.

Forming the imperfect tense.

When forming the imperfect tense, you need to take the ‘nous’ form of the present tense verb, and then drop the –ons. For example, nous avons à av-

This gives you the stem for your imperfect tense. Then you add the ending that goes with the right pronoun:

Je _____ ais

Tu _____ais

Il / Elle / On ___ ait

Nous ____ ions

Vous ____iez

Ils / Elles ____aient

Examples :

Parler (to talk) à nous parlons

‘Parl’ is the stem for forming the imperfect tense.

Je parlais

Tu parlais

Il / Elle / On parlait

Nous parlions

Vous parliez

Ils / Elles parlaient

Only Irregular:

'Etre' is the only verb that is irregular in the imperfect tense. The stem for ETRE in the imperfect is 'ét'. The same endings still apply. 

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1 month ago

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What are the most irregular past participles?

Lots of verbs which are irregular when in the past participle can still be grouped together to make them easier to learn!  Here are a few of the most common irregular past participles. Remember! A past participle is used when forming the perfct tense, the pluperfect tense, or the future perfe...

Lots of verbs which are irregular when in the past participle can still be grouped together to make them easier to learn! 

Here are a few of the most common irregular past participles. Remember! A past participle is used when forming the perfct tense, the pluperfect tense, or the future perfect tense. It must always have an auxiliary verb before it. 

Acquérir > acquis             (to acquire)

Apprendre > appris         (to learn)

Comprendre > compris (to understand)

Mettre > mis                      (to put)

Prendre > pris                   (to take)

Falloir > fallu                       (to need to)

Voir > vu                              (to see)

Vouloir > voulu                 (to want to)

Avoir > eu                           (to have)

Boire > bu                           (to drink)

Connaître > connu           (to know)

Croire > cru                         (to believe)

Devoir > dû                         (to have to do something)

Lire > lu                                (to read)

Pouvoir > pu                      (to be able to do something)

Savoir > su                          (to know)

Tenir > tenu                       (to hold)

Venir > venu                      (to come)

Vivre > vécu                       (to live)

Recevoir > reçu                                 (to receive)        (watch out for ç! The cedilla here softens the sound to an ‘s’ rather than a ‘k’. In ‘recevoir’ it is the ‘e’ that follows the ‘c’ that softens the sound.)

Couvrir > couvert             (to cover)

Dire > dit                              (to say)

Faire > fait                           (to do)

Joindre > joint                   (to join)

Mourir > mort                   (to die)

Offrir > offert                    (to offer)

Ouvrir > ouvert                 (to open)

Souffrir > souffert           (to suffer)

Etre > été                            (to be)

Naître > né                         (to be born)

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1 month ago

45 views
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