Martin L. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor...

Martin L.

Unavailable

Chemistry (Bachelors) - Warwick University

5.0
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

13 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

8 completed lessons

About me

About Me: Hi! I am currently a third-year student studying Chemistry at the University of Warwick; and have had previous tutor experience at my secondary school. I take a patient approach to tutoring and believe that a lot of the concepts they teach in schools can be broken down further to simple points.  I specialise in Maths  and Chemistry tutoring - but please feel free to message me with questions of any nature. Tutorials: If you're interested please do send a message, with which subject you're doing and what exam board. Before tutorials please do message me with a given topic you're finding challenging; or if its for exam preparation, I can find some challenging questions from a variety of topics. Often, particularly in Chemistry the reasoning beyond some of the answers goes beyond the scope of the A Level course - if you're keen an planning on studying Chemistry at Uni, I'll gladly explain some of the principles in full, if not - we can just work on getting you the right answers consistently :)  In science, understanding is everything, and once you learn basics everything else can seem trivial! About Me: Hi! I am currently a third-year student studying Chemistry at the University of Warwick; and have had previous tutor experience at my secondary school. I take a patient approach to tutoring and believe that a lot of the concepts they teach in schools can be broken down further to simple points.  I specialise in Maths  and Chemistry tutoring - but please feel free to message me with questions of any nature. Tutorials: If you're interested please do send a message, with which subject you're doing and what exam board. Before tutorials please do message me with a given topic you're finding challenging; or if its for exam preparation, I can find some challenging questions from a variety of topics. Often, particularly in Chemistry the reasoning beyond some of the answers goes beyond the scope of the A Level course - if you're keen an planning on studying Chemistry at Uni, I'll gladly explain some of the principles in full, if not - we can just work on getting you the right answers consistently :)  In science, understanding is everything, and once you learn basics everything else can seem trivial! 

Show more

Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

No DBS Icon

No DBS Check

Ratings & Reviews

5from 13 customer reviews
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Michaela (Parent from Builth Wells)

November 23 2016

Very happy with the tuition provided, thank you

Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Harry (Student)

December 14 2016

accurate and helpful

Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Harry (Student)

November 23 2016

excellent, very clear and helpful.

Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Harry (Student)

January 12 2017

Show more reviews

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)B

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
ChemistryA Level£20 /hr
MathsA Level£20 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Martin has answered

Proton NMR Made Easier

Proton or 1H NMR can look complicated but with practice; there are techniques that can make the peak assignment a little easier.

1. Make sure you count the proton environments correctly, if the molecule displays a form of symmetry you may count an identical environment!

2. If there is a multiplet at 7.2 ppm - this is always indicative of a benzene like ring.

3. Electronegative groups (N, O, Cl, F) cause de-shielding, moving protons in these environments further down the spectrum, use this as an indicator to find which hydrogens are those near functional groups. In contrast, branching alkane groups CH2 and chain end CH3 will mostly have quite low chemical shift.

4. The (n+1) rule can be used if you have proteins in a similar environment. The peak for a proton environment will split if a carbon adjacent to the one the proton you're observing is attached to protons in a different environment - This will cause the peak to split into (n+1) little peaks, where n is the number of protons on neighbouring carbon.

5. Often NMR questions will have other analysis such as MS in the same question. If your molecule you propose based on your NMR isnt compatible with the MS, try again - always look for differences in 14 m/z values for alkane chains etc.

These questions are worth a lot of marks so take your time.

Proton or 1H NMR can look complicated but with practice; there are techniques that can make the peak assignment a little easier.

1. Make sure you count the proton environments correctly, if the molecule displays a form of symmetry you may count an identical environment!

2. If there is a multiplet at 7.2 ppm - this is always indicative of a benzene like ring.

3. Electronegative groups (N, O, Cl, F) cause de-shielding, moving protons in these environments further down the spectrum, use this as an indicator to find which hydrogens are those near functional groups. In contrast, branching alkane groups CH2 and chain end CH3 will mostly have quite low chemical shift.

4. The (n+1) rule can be used if you have proteins in a similar environment. The peak for a proton environment will split if a carbon adjacent to the one the proton you're observing is attached to protons in a different environment - This will cause the peak to split into (n+1) little peaks, where n is the number of protons on neighbouring carbon.

5. Often NMR questions will have other analysis such as MS in the same question. If your molecule you propose based on your NMR isnt compatible with the MS, try again - always look for differences in 14 m/z values for alkane chains etc.

These questions are worth a lot of marks so take your time.

Show more

2 years ago

646 views

What is a stationary point on a curve? How do I calculate the co-ordinates of a stationary point?

A stationary point simply means a point in a curve where the gradient is equal to 0.

For example, in the June 2015 C3 Paper it is asked:

Find the exact values of the coordinates of the stationary points of the curve.

The curve function is f(x) = 6lnx + x^2 - 8x + 3
To calculate the gradient, we need to differentiate, as the gradient can also be represented as the change in y in respect to the change in x, or in other words dy/dx.

dy/dx = 6/x + 2x - 8

Where dy/dx = 0 is where the stationary point will be, 6/x + 2x - 8 = 0; multiplying all by x will give a quadratic: 6 + 2x^2 - 8x = 0, which can then be factorised: (2x-2)(x-3) = 0

Solving this x = 1 or x= 3. Calculating y from the original function gives y = -4 and y = 6ln3 - 12, giving the co-ordinates (1,-4) and (3,6ln3 - 12)

These questions are often worth a substantial amount of marks.

A stationary point simply means a point in a curve where the gradient is equal to 0.

For example, in the June 2015 C3 Paper it is asked:

Find the exact values of the coordinates of the stationary points of the curve.

The curve function is f(x) = 6lnx + x^2 - 8x + 3
To calculate the gradient, we need to differentiate, as the gradient can also be represented as the change in y in respect to the change in x, or in other words dy/dx.

dy/dx = 6/x + 2x - 8

Where dy/dx = 0 is where the stationary point will be, 6/x + 2x - 8 = 0; multiplying all by x will give a quadratic: 6 + 2x^2 - 8x = 0, which can then be factorised: (2x-2)(x-3) = 0

Solving this x = 1 or x= 3. Calculating y from the original function gives y = -4 and y = 6ln3 - 12, giving the co-ordinates (1,-4) and (3,6ln3 - 12)

These questions are often worth a substantial amount of marks.

Show more

2 years ago

602 views

Send Martin a message

A Free Video Meeting is a great next step. Just ask Martin below!


Send message

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do Online Lessons work?

We use cookies to improve your site experience. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok