James H.

James H.

£24 - £26 /hr

Literae Humaniores (Bachelors) - Balliol College, Oxford University

4.9
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15 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

35 completed lessons

About me

About me: I have just graduated in Classics from Oxford and so I've had a chance to read in some detail all the Latin and Greek authors that are studied at school. My personal passion has always been the Latin and Greek languages.  I love thinking about how these languages work and helping people to understand them.  The more you study them the more you realise they are not so different from English!

How can I help? I can help you in whatever way you need.  I can guide you through reading a difficult set text or unseen passage, or help you to remember words or facts that you struggle to recall in exams.  My main aim is to create an environment where interaction with Greek and Latin is enjoyable.   If you are worried about a particular question in an upcoming exam, then we will identify what makes it hard and work out a strategy to make it less daunting.

About me: I have just graduated in Classics from Oxford and so I've had a chance to read in some detail all the Latin and Greek authors that are studied at school. My personal passion has always been the Latin and Greek languages.  I love thinking about how these languages work and helping people to understand them.  The more you study them the more you realise they are not so different from English!

How can I help? I can help you in whatever way you need.  I can guide you through reading a difficult set text or unseen passage, or help you to remember words or facts that you struggle to recall in exams.  My main aim is to create an environment where interaction with Greek and Latin is enjoyable.   If you are worried about a particular question in an upcoming exam, then we will identify what makes it hard and work out a strategy to make it less daunting.

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About my sessions

So far when tutoring I have set out with the tutee what needs to be covered and then divided it up into the desired number of lessons.  However, I am flexible with regard to this kind of structuring.

So far when tutoring I have set out with the tutee what needs to be covered and then divided it up into the desired number of lessons.  However, I am flexible with regard to this kind of structuring.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

4.9
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15 customer reviews
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FL
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Fang Parent from Kingston upon Thames Lesson review 17 Jan, 19:00

18 Jan

James is very helpful and Robin really enjoys his lessons!

FL
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Fang Parent from Kingston upon Thames Lesson review 13 Dec '18, 19:00

17 Dec, 2018

James's lesson are very helpful! My son enjoys them!

FL
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Fang Parent from Kingston upon Thames

24 Oct, 2018

My son found James' lesson is very helpful! Thanks!

CW
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Charlie Student Lesson review 26 Mar '17, 17:00

26 Mar, 2017

was really helpful and useful. Slight issue with the passage at the start but we made up

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
LatinA-level (A2)A*
GreekA-level (A2)A
ClassicsDegree (Bachelors)2.1

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Classical GreekA Level£26 /hr
LatinA Level£26 /hr
Classical GreekGCSE£24 /hr
LatinGCSE£24 /hr
Classical Greek13 Plus£24 /hr
Latin13 Plus£24 /hr

Questions James has answered

How can I get better at commenting on passages from my set texts?

This is one of the most difficult questions in the exam, because it requires both linguistic knowledge and a literary appreciation of the text. In question 2a of Section B in the current format of A2 Latin, you are asked to answer a question about a specific passage which you are given in Latin. The question usually asks how the poet achieves a certain effect. The first trick here is to have prepared the text in the right way. A memorisation of the translation, for example, whilst perhaps just good enough to get you through the translation question, will not furnish you with enough knowledge to comment intelligently on a passage of Latin. By contrast, If you really understand how the words fit together, then you will be able to make points about the grammar and style even if you do not know a lot of technical words (eg. "alliteration" etc.). It is important not to be too general in answering these questions: that will suggest to the examiner that you are not well acquainted with the Latin that is in front of you. Quote from the Latin as evidence for every point that you make. It is important to go beyond giving some kind of summary of the passage. Sentences of the kind "Virgil says that..." are not fully engaging with the question. Your job as commentator here is to draw the link between the Latin that you quote and the effect that it has. If you neglect to do this for any point in your answer, then you will not get the full benefit of your observation.To do as well as you possibly can, you should aim to go into the exam knowing the significance of each part of your set text. A tutor can be useful in helping you to identify this.If you have spent time with the text and are familiar with it, then the rest will be a question of technique.This is one of the most difficult questions in the exam, because it requires both linguistic knowledge and a literary appreciation of the text. In question 2a of Section B in the current format of A2 Latin, you are asked to answer a question about a specific passage which you are given in Latin. The question usually asks how the poet achieves a certain effect. The first trick here is to have prepared the text in the right way. A memorisation of the translation, for example, whilst perhaps just good enough to get you through the translation question, will not furnish you with enough knowledge to comment intelligently on a passage of Latin. By contrast, If you really understand how the words fit together, then you will be able to make points about the grammar and style even if you do not know a lot of technical words (eg. "alliteration" etc.). It is important not to be too general in answering these questions: that will suggest to the examiner that you are not well acquainted with the Latin that is in front of you. Quote from the Latin as evidence for every point that you make. It is important to go beyond giving some kind of summary of the passage. Sentences of the kind "Virgil says that..." are not fully engaging with the question. Your job as commentator here is to draw the link between the Latin that you quote and the effect that it has. If you neglect to do this for any point in your answer, then you will not get the full benefit of your observation.To do as well as you possibly can, you should aim to go into the exam knowing the significance of each part of your set text. A tutor can be useful in helping you to identify this.If you have spent time with the text and are familiar with it, then the rest will be a question of technique.

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2 years ago

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How can I make sense of the sentences of Thucydides and Euripides?

Summary: These tasks are called "unseen", but if you read plenty of Thucydides and Euripides the style of the passages in the exam will feel familiar!Thucydides' prose can, for example in the speeches that he records, be some of the most difficult. The task of translating a passage from Thucydides requires more literary sensitivity than do any of the other language tasks in A-Level Greek. The only way to become comfortable with his style is to read some Thucydides with a solid grasp of Greek grammar and vocabulary (though the examiners will gloss obscure words and usages for you). You will probably have noticed from your study of set texts that many authors' styles seem impenetrable at first until you get an instinct for how they like to shape their sentences. Something that always used to throw me off was the distant separation within a sentence of agreeing words. This rarely happened in GCSE, and so suddenly having to search to find which word agrees with which could be a struggle. These separations will cease to trouble you once you have spent some time with Thucydides. It will become second nature to find the participle that comes twenty words after the noun that it describes. This preparation can be especially enjoyable as a change from the prescribed nature of the course. Thucydides wrote a history of the entire Peloponnesian War, covering events of over fifty years and much of the rise and fall of the great Athenian Empire. You can select passages from all over this incredible work, dipping in wherever takes your fancy in his often exciting narrative. I would reiterate finally that all this will be much more fruitful and pleasurable if you have first learnt to recognise all the different endings that Greek words can take. Once you have learnt these, reading texts such as Thucydides will cement them into your memory.Euripides is an easier choice as a verse writer than Thucydides as a prose writer. However, Greek verse poses its own difficulties, especially when we are used to reading a certain type of prose Greek. Whereas Thucydides, though very difficult, does not vary far from most of the rules that you will have learnt, Euripides will use the occasional unfamiliar verb form and seem to miss out words much more often than you expect. Fortunately, the grammatical differences between Euripides' Greek and the Greek that you have learnt are not massive. Also helpful are the line breaks that occur in verse, which often coincide with syntactical breaks such as the end of a clause or sentence. The easiest passages of Euripides, where verse can become easier than prose, are the conversations between characters that take the form of "stichomythia". Here characters speak one line at a time in a rapid exchange of usually quite emotional sentences. Needless to say, when each sentence is about five words long our job as translators becomes a lot simpler! To prepare for this "verse unseen" part of the exam, the plan will be the same as for Thucydides. The difference will be that we might make even more effort to note where Euripides does something with his Greek that we have not seen in prose.Because it is somewhat intangible, not enough emphasis is placed on the instinct that is gained from reading Greek. In fact, this instinct is just as important as the learning of tables when it comes to translating authentic passages of Greek.Summary: These tasks are called "unseen", but if you read plenty of Thucydides and Euripides the style of the passages in the exam will feel familiar!Thucydides' prose can, for example in the speeches that he records, be some of the most difficult. The task of translating a passage from Thucydides requires more literary sensitivity than do any of the other language tasks in A-Level Greek. The only way to become comfortable with his style is to read some Thucydides with a solid grasp of Greek grammar and vocabulary (though the examiners will gloss obscure words and usages for you). You will probably have noticed from your study of set texts that many authors' styles seem impenetrable at first until you get an instinct for how they like to shape their sentences. Something that always used to throw me off was the distant separation within a sentence of agreeing words. This rarely happened in GCSE, and so suddenly having to search to find which word agrees with which could be a struggle. These separations will cease to trouble you once you have spent some time with Thucydides. It will become second nature to find the participle that comes twenty words after the noun that it describes. This preparation can be especially enjoyable as a change from the prescribed nature of the course. Thucydides wrote a history of the entire Peloponnesian War, covering events of over fifty years and much of the rise and fall of the great Athenian Empire. You can select passages from all over this incredible work, dipping in wherever takes your fancy in his often exciting narrative. I would reiterate finally that all this will be much more fruitful and pleasurable if you have first learnt to recognise all the different endings that Greek words can take. Once you have learnt these, reading texts such as Thucydides will cement them into your memory.Euripides is an easier choice as a verse writer than Thucydides as a prose writer. However, Greek verse poses its own difficulties, especially when we are used to reading a certain type of prose Greek. Whereas Thucydides, though very difficult, does not vary far from most of the rules that you will have learnt, Euripides will use the occasional unfamiliar verb form and seem to miss out words much more often than you expect. Fortunately, the grammatical differences between Euripides' Greek and the Greek that you have learnt are not massive. Also helpful are the line breaks that occur in verse, which often coincide with syntactical breaks such as the end of a clause or sentence. The easiest passages of Euripides, where verse can become easier than prose, are the conversations between characters that take the form of "stichomythia". Here characters speak one line at a time in a rapid exchange of usually quite emotional sentences. Needless to say, when each sentence is about five words long our job as translators becomes a lot simpler! To prepare for this "verse unseen" part of the exam, the plan will be the same as for Thucydides. The difference will be that we might make even more effort to note where Euripides does something with his Greek that we have not seen in prose.Because it is somewhat intangible, not enough emphasis is placed on the instinct that is gained from reading Greek. In fact, this instinct is just as important as the learning of tables when it comes to translating authentic passages of Greek.

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2 years ago

889 views

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