Maria F. GCSE Physics tutor, A Level Physics tutor, GCSE Maths tutor,...

Maria F.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Natural Sciences (Bachelors) - York University

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About me

I am a second year BSc Natural Sciences undergraduate at the University of York, specialising in Physics and Biology. I’ve always been fascinated by science, finding out how everything works and how the universe fits together, especially the way the three separate sciences fit together, the maths behind the physics, the physics behind the chemistry and the chemistry behind the biology. In my spare time, I am part of the baking society, I do trampolining, and I’m currently doing a placement as a teaching assistant at a secondary school in York once a week, so I have experience working with students. As I am also from a large family, getting on with people is second nature for me! The sessions will focus on the topics you find most difficult, and on ways of helping you understand the science behind it all. We’ll find techniques and tricks to help you revise, many that I’ve tried and tested with my own GCSEs and A-levels. Once we’ve covered the topics, I will find relevant exam questions (to the exam board) which we can go over as well, as often I find that the key to success is confidence, which this practice will give you.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
PhysicsA-LevelA*
BiologyA-LevelA
ChemistryA-LevelA
MathsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 5 customer reviews

Emma (Student) February 22 2017

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Questions Maria has answered

Define electrical resistance

It's often best to use an equation when asked for definitions like this. In this case, use Ohm's law: R = V/I (where V is potential difference, I is current and R is resistance, measured in ohms)It's often best to use an equation when asked for definitions like this. In this case, use Ohm's law: R = V/I (where V is potential difference, I is current and R is resistance, measured in ohms)

3 months ago

119 views

Describe and explain the photoelectric effect (6 marks)

In the photoelectric effect, the electromagnetic wave is thought to exist as quanta (discrete packets) of energy, called photons. When an EM wave is directed at a metal surface, the photons are absorbed by the electrons, causing them to be emitted from the surface. This will only happen if the...In the photoelectric effect, the electromagnetic wave is thought to exist as quanta (discrete packets) of energy, called photons. When an EM wave is directed at a metal surface, the photons are absorbed by the electrons, causing them to be emitted from the surface. This will only happen if the photon has greater energy than the work function energy of the metal. The kinetic energy of the electrons depends on the energy of the photon- the maximum KE of an electron emitted is equal to the energy of the photon minus the work function of the metal. The number of electrons emitted depends on light intensity, as a higher light intensity means more photons of light and therefore more electrons emitted. see more

3 months ago

131 views

What is the trend in reactivity of Group 2 elements with halogens as the group is descended?

In group 2 elements, the reactivity is a measure of how easily the atoms lose outer shell electrons. An atom at the top of the group, such as magnesium, has less shells meaning the atomic radius is smaller, and the net attractive force from the nucleus on the outer shell electrons is greater, ...In group 2 elements, the reactivity is a measure of how easily the atoms lose outer shell electrons. An atom at the top of the group, such as magnesium, has less shells meaning the atomic radius is smaller, and the net attractive force from the nucleus on the outer shell electrons is greater, meaning it's harder to lose electrons to a halogen, i.e., it's less reactive. An atom at the bottom of the group, such as barium, is more reactive. This is because although the proton number has increased, increasing the attraction the nucleus has for outer shell electrons, the number of shells has also increased significantly. As a result, the electron shielding is far greater so the nuclear force exerted on outer shell electrons is weaker, and so it's easier for a halogen to take them in a reaction. see more

3 months ago

120 views
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