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Luke H.

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Mathematics (Bachelors) - Warwick University

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4 completed lessons

About me

About Me:

Hi there I'm Luke, and have just graduated from the University of Warwick with a 1st class maths degree. I am passionate about maths and enjoy helping others understand it. I am a patient tutor and a very good listener, creating an environment that is comfortable for the student to learn in, adapting to each individual person. Everyone learns in different ways, so I'm here to help in whatever way is best for you. 

 

Experience 

For the last 2 summers I have taught maths in township schools in South Africa with classes of over 50 students where English wasn't their first language, and with limited resources.

In addition I was a peer tutor for the University of Warwick maths department helping to tutor a 1st year mathematics module. I completed a placement at a local secondary school as part of my degree undertaking teaching tasks, and have more experience of working with young people through working on various summer schools.

I have good availability for tutoring sessions at the moment so please give me an email if you are interested. 

About Me:

Hi there I'm Luke, and have just graduated from the University of Warwick with a 1st class maths degree. I am passionate about maths and enjoy helping others understand it. I am a patient tutor and a very good listener, creating an environment that is comfortable for the student to learn in, adapting to each individual person. Everyone learns in different ways, so I'm here to help in whatever way is best for you. 

 

Experience 

For the last 2 summers I have taught maths in township schools in South Africa with classes of over 50 students where English wasn't their first language, and with limited resources.

In addition I was a peer tutor for the University of Warwick maths department helping to tutor a 1st year mathematics module. I completed a placement at a local secondary school as part of my degree undertaking teaching tasks, and have more experience of working with young people through working on various summer schools.

I have good availability for tutoring sessions at the moment so please give me an email if you are interested. 

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

27/11/2014

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsDegree (Bachelors)1st
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
PhysicsA-level (A2)A*
MusicA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Further MathematicsA Level£24 /hr
MathsA Level£24 /hr
MathsGCSE£22 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£22 /hr
Maths13 Plus£22 /hr

Questions Luke has answered

How to determine the modulus of a complex number?

All complex numbers are in the form a+bi where a is the real part of the complex number and b is the imaginary part. Therefore if we are plotting the complex number on argand diagram the value of a tells us where the real part lies (i.e the x value) and the value of b tells us where the imaginary part is (i.e the y value).

The modulus is the distance from the origin to this point, so can be found using pythagorus' theorem. Therefore if z is the modulus z^2=a^2+b^2. We can see this method will work wherever the point is on the argand diagram and so know that sqrt(a^2+b^2) will always give us the modulus of a complex number. 

 

All complex numbers are in the form a+bi where a is the real part of the complex number and b is the imaginary part. Therefore if we are plotting the complex number on argand diagram the value of a tells us where the real part lies (i.e the x value) and the value of b tells us where the imaginary part is (i.e the y value).

The modulus is the distance from the origin to this point, so can be found using pythagorus' theorem. Therefore if z is the modulus z^2=a^2+b^2. We can see this method will work wherever the point is on the argand diagram and so know that sqrt(a^2+b^2) will always give us the modulus of a complex number. 

 

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3 years ago

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