Dan S. GCSE Physics tutor, A Level Physics tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A...

Dan S.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Physics (Masters) - Exeter University

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About me

Unfortunately all booked up at the moment, thank you for your interest.

I`m a second year Physics student at the University of Exeter, with a passion for Physics and Mathematics. I`m happy to teach GCSE and A-Level Physics and Mathematics. 

I aim to concentrate on helping tutees develop a intuitive understanding of the syllabus, as exam success follows naturally. With less able students it can be better to learn how to tackle simple exam problems first, and to build understanding from there. 

I enjoy teaching, and my principal aims are for tutees to find Maths and Physics fun, and have exam success.

Tutees often need content explained in simple, basic terminology. I find it helps to explain topics assuming as little prior knowledge as possible, and by giving real life examples. 

I typically plan an hour lesson as follows:

Introduction to the topic, by me, with tutee involvement (~20min): I try to involve the tutee as much as possible, making the lessons more enjoyable, and tutee focused. Depending on the type of learner (seeing, hearing or doing) I can bring resources - such as playing cards, dice or a whiteboard (young children love using a whiteboard!!).  During the introduction I will give examples of how the topic applies to real life - making maths seem more important than many tutees realise. 

Examples (~15min): Examples are important for the tutee to prepare for exams and ‘cement in’ the knowledge. More complicated examples, often involving real life (‘wordy questions’), help tutees think more ‘out the box’. As the tutee becomes more confident with the topic, they can answer questions more independently. 

Break (~5-10 min): This allows the tutee to stop thinking about the topic for 5-10 minutes. Often I bring a deck of cards and we play maths games, which improve mental maths. 

More complicated examples (10min): Once the basics of the topic are understood, more complicated examples tackled. These are more likely to appear in exams. 

Summary (10min): I explain the important points from the topic and leave the tutee with an example question (answered by me) and perhaps some homework. Homework helps the tutee learn to answer questions independently - neither me, you or the tutee’s maths teacher will be in the exam! 

This plan is a guide, and can be changed to meet a tutee’s needs. If a tutee has already studied a topic, often the introduction does not have to be as long. 

Tutees often respond well to having a more tailored approach to learning, which comes from tutorials. In a class of 20+ individuals, a teacher can not cater for the needs of every student! Less able students often find themselves struggling, whilst more able students may not be reaching their potential. 

I am happy to answer any questions, and try to respond ASAP - just message me!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
English Literature A-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

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No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Questions Dan has answered

Explain the workings of a mass spectrometer

Charged particles are fired into a magnetic field (perpendicular to the motion of the particles). Using Fleming’s left hand rule, a magnetic force acts centripetally – such that the charged particles exhibit circular motion. By equating the magnetic force acting on each charge, with the equa...

Charged particles are fired into a magnetic field (perpendicular to the motion of the particles). Using Fleming’s left hand rule, a magnetic force acts centripetally – such that the charged particles exhibit circular motion.

By equating the magnetic force acting on each charge, with the equation for centripetal force, we have:

Bqv=mv2/r    (1)

Where B is the magnetic field strength

            q is the charge of each particle

            m is the mass of each particle

            r is the radius of curvature of each particle (i.e. the radius of circular motion)

            v is the speed of each particle.

Rearranging equation (1) for m, we have:

m=Bqr/v          (2)

Equation (2) allows us to calculate the mass of ionised atoms, with a charge q related to the number of electrons each ion has gained/lost, assuming we can measure the radius and velocity of each particle. In practice, we would fire the ions through a florescent gas, so their circular motion becomes visible. The speed at which ions enter the magnetic field, v, can be adjusted using an electric field to accelerate the ions into the magnetic field. 

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7 months ago

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