Sam E. A Level Extended Project Qualification tutor, A Level Physics ...

Sam E.

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Degree: Physics with Australian Study (Masters) - Exeter University

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About me

Hi! My name is Sam England. I was born in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne 19 years ago and grew up there before moving to Andover. My passion for space was evident from a very young age (I think my parents were actually a little worried I liked it too much), so when I found out you could do a degree in physics, the laws that try to model such a fascinatingly large and complex system, I immediately knew that's what I wanted to do.

If I'm honest I still hope to be an astronaut one day! But if this does not come to fruition I would happily work in the field of scientific research, in planetary science or astrobiology.

I'm now studying at the University of Exeter, for a Masters in Physics, so am hopefully well on my way. Whilst studying for my A-levels I also wrote a scientific book titled "The Spaceman's Handbook: Colonising Extra-Terrestrial Bodies", which was a non-fiction science book designed for teenagers to get there first taste of how we might be able to live on other planets in the surprisingly near future. Because of this I have experience in breaking down complicated scientific ideas, making them understandable for the teenage market, and applying an interesting context to them, which I intend to transfer over to my skills as a tutor.

Now for the formal-ish qualification part: I achieved A*AABB in EPQ, Physics, Maths, Politics, and General Studies respectively at A-level, and earned A* grades in Physics, Maths, Chemistry and Biology at GCSE, so understand how these courses work to a high level.

I hope you consider me as a tutor!

Sam.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Extended Project Qualification A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
PhysicsA-LevelA
MathematicsA-LevelA
Government & PoliticsA-LevelB
General StudiesA-LevelB
Extended Project QualificationA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Sam has answered

How do I calculate the rate of change of something for which I don't have an equation?

This kind of question is an application of differentiation. If t represents time, any derivative with respect to t is a rate of change. For example, if h represents the depth of water in a cubicle container, dh/dt is the change in depth over time, or the rate of change of the depth in other wo...

This kind of question is an application of differentiation. If t represents time, any derivative with respect to t is a rate of change. For example, if h represents the depth of water in a cubicle container, dh/dt is the change in depth over time, or the rate of change of the depth in other words. If the question does not give you an equation that directly relates the thing you want the rate of change of to time, it will often give you an equation that relates a different quantity to time. For example, it might ask you to calculate the rate of change of volume of water in the container, but not give you an equation for volume in terms of time, and so one differentiation won't suffice. I find it really helpful to write out what I'm trying to calculate and how I could do so with the given terms. Let's say we need to calculate the rate of change of volume of water in the container. We are given that the rate of change of depth (dh/dt) is 10m/s, and that the container is a cuboid with dimensions of 50x50xh m. We want dV/dt. We have dh/dt, so if we write this out we know that dV/dt = (dh/dt)*(some other derivative). If you treat derivatives as fractions (which you normally can), you can see that in order cancel out dh, the other derivative must be dV/dh. We know that the equation for volume in terms of h for a cuboid of dimensions 50x50xh is simply V=2500h. Differentiate this and you get dV/dh=2500. All that's left to do is to multiply the two derivatives together, so dV/dt=10*2500 = 25000. So the rate of change of volume is 25000m^3/s.

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2 years ago

525 views

How do I manage the workload of an EPQ alongside other A-levels?

I think the most important skill to develop is time management and scheduling ability. Try to assign specific times each week that are solely dedicated to working on your EPQ. If your timetable has free periods I personally found these to be the best times because it meant I still had access t...

I think the most important skill to develop is time management and scheduling ability. Try to assign specific times each week that are solely dedicated to working on your EPQ. If your timetable has free periods I personally found these to be the best times because it meant I still had access to all the relevant files. Depending on what your EPQ entails, I would say try to work on your EPQ for at least 3 hours a week, although if like me you're doing something with a higher work load such as writing a book (I did this), you might want to consider dedicating slightly more time.

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2 years ago

559 views

What is the main evidence for the Big Bang theory?

The main evidence that we currently have to support the Big Bang Theory is the cosmic background radiation. This is electromagnetic radiation that appears to be evenly spread throughout the universe. It is mostly in the microwave spectrum, equating to a temperature of about 3K. This suggests t...

The main evidence that we currently have to support the Big Bang Theory is the cosmic background radiation. This is electromagnetic radiation that appears to be evenly spread throughout the universe. It is mostly in the microwave spectrum, equating to a temperature of about 3K. This suggests that the universe was once very hot and compressed, and as the universe has expanded, the once very high energy, short wavelength radiation has red-shifted to lower energy, longer wavelength microwave radiation.

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2 years ago

417 views
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