Sam F. GCSE Politics tutor, A Level Politics tutor

Sam F.

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Degree: Politics and International Relations (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

I am currently in my second year at Bristol University studying Politics and International Relations. I spent four months of my gap year in Ecuador working as an English teacher in a local high school. The classes normally contained at least 40 students, so I had to learn quickly how to keep them engaged at all times. This experience gave me a vital insight into the importance of using different learning styles and methods to accommodate everyone, which plays a key role in how I teach politics. Lessons are for the students, not for me, and so I will always tailor my teaching style to the individual. 
 
I have always been someone with an interest in politics, but it was A level teacher who really engaged me with the subject. I would love to inspire more students to go on and study politics, but I know not everyone will feel the same. So if it's just help getting those all important grades, I'm more than happy to do that too, but don't think I won't try my hardest! 
 
Succeeding in Politics is all about the ability to analyse, and you are tested on your ability to demonstrate those analytical skills. I aim to encourage my students to analyse and critically engage with the subject matter, so that when it comes to the exam they will have the confidence and ability to do so independently. I believe the best way to get students interested is to use current examples whereever possible, as this means it really feels relevant to them. 
 
 
 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Politics A Level £20 /hr
Politics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Government and PoliticsA-LevelA
FrenchA-LevelA
EconomicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Sam has answered

Briefly outline some of the difficulties third parties in the U.S face when trying to secure electoral campaign funding.

Third parties in the U.S face a number of difficulties when competing against the two dominant parties, those of the Republican party and the Democratic party.  There are two important factors to consider. The first of these is lack of funding. Third parties have traditionally found it very d...

Third parties in the U.S face a number of difficulties when competing against the two dominant parties, those of the Republican party and the Democratic party. 

There are two important factors to consider. The first of these is lack of funding. Third parties have traditionally found it very difficult to secure funding, vital for an effective electoral campaign. This is partly due to the fact they rarely achieve the threshold (5% of the popular vote at the previous election) needed to secure government funding for the following year. Another important reason is the relationship American politics has with big business. Large corporations, and wealthy businessmen want to back the winner, and as this has, for such a long time, been one of the two main parties, third parties find it very difficult to attract big donations. This all has a reinforcing effect. As the dominance of the two main parties continues, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, and third parties find it increasingly difficult to secure funding.

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2 years ago

403 views

What is meant by the term 'sofa government'?

The term 'sofa government' refers to a type of informal decision making within government. Unsuprisingly the name comes from the idea that politicians and their advisors would be sat on sofas discussing potential policy ideas, for example. The term came into use during the Tony Blair years in ...

The term 'sofa government' refers to a type of informal decision making within government. Unsuprisingly the name comes from the idea that politicians and their advisors would be sat on sofas discussing potential policy ideas, for example. The term came into use during the Tony Blair years in which he introduced a very relaxed style of government, famously telling his ministers "Call me Tony". Blair preferred to have these informal discussions in smaller groups where he could speak more freely without his discussions being 'minuted' in a more formal cabinet setting. 

 

 

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2 years ago

1728 views
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