PremiumAlex H. A Level Economics tutor, GCSE Economics tutor

Alex H.

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Economics (Bachelors) - Durham University

4.6
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11 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

85 completed lessons

About me

Hi,

I'm Alex, a trainee accoutant. I graduated from Durham University with a 2:1 honours in Economics.

I tutor Economics at all levels, specialising in, but not limited to, the AQA Economics A-Level qualification.

I aim to help you achieve and exceed your goals, from understanding a concept to taking the exam.

I am available at weekends only.

Please contact me for a tutorial or a free introductory session.

Hi,

I'm Alex, a trainee accoutant. I graduated from Durham University with a 2:1 honours in Economics.

I tutor Economics at all levels, specialising in, but not limited to, the AQA Economics A-Level qualification.

I aim to help you achieve and exceed your goals, from understanding a concept to taking the exam.

I am available at weekends only.

Please contact me for a tutorial or a free introductory session.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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04/11/2015

Ratings & Reviews

4.6from 11 customer reviews
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Helen (Student)

April 20 2016

Having contacted him for a few times regarding the feedback of my essays for the past 4 weeks, but still had not heard anything back yet.

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Yemi (Parent from Basildon)

April 5 2016

Topic well taught, and prepared for. My son was engaged throughout.

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Helen (Student)

February 9 2016

Theory well explained. Thank you!

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John (Parent from Frodsham)

May 7 2015

Excellent. A gifted tutor.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
EconomicsA-level (A2)A*
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
MathsA-level (A2)A
LatinA-level (A2)B
EconomicsDegree (Bachelors)2:1 honours

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EconomicsA Level£30 /hr
EconomicsGCSE£30 /hr

Questions Alex has answered

Tax incidence: how is a tax borne between consumers and producers?

A tax imposed on a good will affect the supply curve of that good, since it artificially increases the cost of manfacturing that good. Therefore, the supply curve will shift left. This will push the price up. We need to determine how much of that price increase will be felt by the consumer and how much will be "absorbed" by the supplier.

We can determine this by looking at the demand curve:

The burden of the tax depends overall on the elasticity of the demand curve. The more inelastic the demand curve, the more of the tax will be borne by the consumer.

This is intuitive; remember that an inelastic good is one which the consumer is largely indifferent to price changes - they will continue to purchase their chosen quantity of the good, despite price changes. A tax is a form of price change.

Diagrammatically:

(Diagrams from Tutor2U)

The price increase is borne by consumers and the rest of the tax (the gap between the supply curves) is borne by the producer.

 

For an elastic good, i.e. a good with quite a flat demand curve, we can see that the resulting consumer price: P1 to P2 is much smaller than the tax. Thus, the producer has absorbed a lot of the tax. It's worth noting that the fall in demand is still quite large.

For an inelastic good, the consumer price change is much larger: P1-P2.

.

 

A tax imposed on a good will affect the supply curve of that good, since it artificially increases the cost of manfacturing that good. Therefore, the supply curve will shift left. This will push the price up. We need to determine how much of that price increase will be felt by the consumer and how much will be "absorbed" by the supplier.

We can determine this by looking at the demand curve:

The burden of the tax depends overall on the elasticity of the demand curve. The more inelastic the demand curve, the more of the tax will be borne by the consumer.

This is intuitive; remember that an inelastic good is one which the consumer is largely indifferent to price changes - they will continue to purchase their chosen quantity of the good, despite price changes. A tax is a form of price change.

Diagrammatically:

(Diagrams from Tutor2U)

The price increase is borne by consumers and the rest of the tax (the gap between the supply curves) is borne by the producer.

 

For an elastic good, i.e. a good with quite a flat demand curve, we can see that the resulting consumer price: P1 to P2 is much smaller than the tax. Thus, the producer has absorbed a lot of the tax. It's worth noting that the fall in demand is still quite large.

For an inelastic good, the consumer price change is much larger: P1-P2.

.

 

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3 years ago

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