Shaurya B. GCSE Chemistry tutor, A Level Maths tutor, A Level Physics...

Shaurya B.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: MPhys Physics (Masters) - Exeter University

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1 review| 1 completed tutorial

Contact Shaurya

About me

I am currently a student at the Univerity of Exeter, undertaking a Physics degree. I have a passion for Physics and generally enjoy learning new topics in science. So I hope I can instill that in you, (if you already do not like it which is more likely)

I can cover a range of topic and am flexible, so you can easily guide what I will cover in our tutoring sessions. 

I did not like how Science, particularly at GCSE, was taught. I would sit there just being bombarded with formulas, and expected to plug in numbers to get answers. 

You cannot truly grasp science by memorising formulas, but to get to grips with the concept at the fundamental level. This will be my goal, because I truly believe once you know the ins and out of the basic concepts, you can tackle any problem. And of course with practise you'll get faster and more efficient which is good news for exams! 

To ensure this, I may first give question that require verbal explanations and a bit more thought than just plugging questions into a formula. I may also give some real life examples which I have come across while studying at Uni, where appropriate.

I find Sci-Fi movies have quite a few Physics problems, which are good to test your understanding on. 

Overall, I hope the tutorial sessions we have are fun and insightful, If I have been successful you'll walk away with a new love for science. (Which I am sure you already have!)

 

I am currently a student at the Univerity of Exeter, undertaking a Physics degree. I have a passion for Physics and generally enjoy learning new topics in science. So I hope I can instill that in you, (if you already do not like it which is more likely)

I can cover a range of topic and am flexible, so you can easily guide what I will cover in our tutoring sessions. 

I did not like how Science, particularly at GCSE, was taught. I would sit there just being bombarded with formulas, and expected to plug in numbers to get answers. 

You cannot truly grasp science by memorising formulas, but to get to grips with the concept at the fundamental level. This will be my goal, because I truly believe once you know the ins and out of the basic concepts, you can tackle any problem. And of course with practise you'll get faster and more efficient which is good news for exams! 

To ensure this, I may first give question that require verbal explanations and a bit more thought than just plugging questions into a formula. I may also give some real life examples which I have come across while studying at Uni, where appropriate.

I find Sci-Fi movies have quite a few Physics problems, which are good to test your understanding on. 

Overall, I hope the tutorial sessions we have are fun and insightful, If I have been successful you'll walk away with a new love for science. (Which I am sure you already have!)

 

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 1 customer review
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Liv (Student)

May 15 2016

Useful session

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
EconomicsA-level (A2)B

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MathsA Level£20 /hr
PhysicsA Level£20 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
EconomicsGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Shaurya has answered

What is the Centripetal force, and how does it keep objects in circular motion?

The Centripetal Force is not a new force which begins to act on an object as it moves in a circle. It is in fact the result of an imbalance of the forces acting on an object i.e the net force. This net force acts at or has a component at 90 degrees to the direction the object is already moving in. 

The force as a result does no work, it does not change the speed but only the direction of the objects velocity. Since it is constantly at 90 degrees, as the objects direction deviates the force then again causes it to deviate it's direction, therefore it's trajectory is described by a circle.

The centripetal force should not be confused with the Centrifugal force, there is no such thing as the centrifugal force. There is no reactive force opposing the centripetal force, to push outwards. Newton's third law does not apply here as the Centripetal force is the netforce, which points towards the centre of the circle, the arc of which is what the object travelling across. 

Whenever, you, in a car or roller coaster, feel getting pushed outwards as you move in a circle is not due to a force pushing you outwards. It is e fact that your body has inertia or mass, and it wants to keep traveling in the forward direction, whilst the car movies inwards, the resistance to the inward force cause you to think there is another force pushing you outward. When in reality you are moving forwards whilst the car is moving inwards 90 degrees to you causing you to then follow the cars trajectory. 

 

The Value of the centripetal force is given by mv2/r , where v is the velocity of the object. And r is the radius of the circle. 

The Centripetal Force is not a new force which begins to act on an object as it moves in a circle. It is in fact the result of an imbalance of the forces acting on an object i.e the net force. This net force acts at or has a component at 90 degrees to the direction the object is already moving in. 

The force as a result does no work, it does not change the speed but only the direction of the objects velocity. Since it is constantly at 90 degrees, as the objects direction deviates the force then again causes it to deviate it's direction, therefore it's trajectory is described by a circle.

The centripetal force should not be confused with the Centrifugal force, there is no such thing as the centrifugal force. There is no reactive force opposing the centripetal force, to push outwards. Newton's third law does not apply here as the Centripetal force is the netforce, which points towards the centre of the circle, the arc of which is what the object travelling across. 

Whenever, you, in a car or roller coaster, feel getting pushed outwards as you move in a circle is not due to a force pushing you outwards. It is e fact that your body has inertia or mass, and it wants to keep traveling in the forward direction, whilst the car movies inwards, the resistance to the inward force cause you to think there is another force pushing you outward. When in reality you are moving forwards whilst the car is moving inwards 90 degrees to you causing you to then follow the cars trajectory. 

 

The Value of the centripetal force is given by mv2/r , where v is the velocity of the object. And r is the radius of the circle. 

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3 years ago

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